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Page 97
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meetings and Other Activities." Transportation Research Board. 2002. An Assessment of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's Rating System for Rollover Resistance: Special Report 265. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10308.
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Page 98
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meetings and Other Activities." Transportation Research Board. 2002. An Assessment of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's Rating System for Rollover Resistance: Special Report 265. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10308.
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The following speakers addressed the committee during the open discussion:

  • Michael Cammisa, Association of International Automobile Manufacturers, Inc.;

  • Barry Felrice, DaimlerChrysler Corporation;

  • Doug Greenhaus, National Automobile Dealers Association; and

  • Ian Jones, Consultant, Great Falls, Va.

SECOND COMMITTEE MEETING: MAY 29–30, 2001, WASHINGTON, D.C.

The following presentations were made to the committee by invited speakers:


Aberdeen Test Center Roadway Simulator

Greg Schultz, U.S. Army Aberdeen Test Center, and Carl Larsen, MTS Systems Corporation


Collection of NASS CDS Data Relating to Rollover

Robert Woodill, Veridian Engineering, and John Brophy, NHTSA


Communicating Risk-Based Information to the Consumer

Michael S. Wogalter, North Carolina State University


The following speakers addressed the committee during the open discussion:

  • Wade Allen, Systems Technology, Inc.;

  • George Ball, Graeme Fowler, and Jerry Hashimura, American Suzuki Motor Corporation;

  • Joan Claybrook, Public Citizen;

  • Clarence Ditlow, Center for Auto Safety;

  • Phil Headley, Continental Teves;

  • Ian Jones, Consultant, Great Falls, Va.;

  • Jeya Padmanaban, JP Research;

  • R. David Pittle, Consumers Union; and

  • Tab Turner, Turner & Associates.

SITE VISITS

Visit to Consumers Union Vehicle Test Facility, East Haddam, Conn., June 21, 2001.


Site Visits to Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, Mich.; General Motors Proving Ground, Milford, Mich.; and DaimlerChrysler Proving Ground, Chelsea, Mich.; July 24–25, 2001.

Page 99
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meetings and Other Activities." Transportation Research Board. 2002. An Assessment of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's Rating System for Rollover Resistance: Special Report 265. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10308.
×

THIRD COMMITTEE MEETING: JULY 25–26, 2001, DEARBORN, MICH.

FOURTH COMMITTEE MEETING: OCTOBER 30–31, 2001, WASHINGTON, D.C.

ADDITIONAL DATA GATHERING

In addition to material presented to the committee during the information-gathering meetings listed above, a number of organizations and individuals provided written submissions for the committee’s consideration. A list of all nonproprietary materials considered by the committee is available from the Public Records Office of the National Academies (e-mail: publicac@nas.edu).

Page 97
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meetings and Other Activities." Transportation Research Board. 2002. An Assessment of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's Rating System for Rollover Resistance: Special Report 265. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10308.
×
Page 97
Page 98
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meetings and Other Activities." Transportation Research Board. 2002. An Assessment of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's Rating System for Rollover Resistance: Special Report 265. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10308.
×
Page 98
Page 99
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meetings and Other Activities." Transportation Research Board. 2002. An Assessment of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's Rating System for Rollover Resistance: Special Report 265. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10308.
×
Page 99
Next: Appendix C: Supplementary Statistical Results »
An Assessment of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's Rating System for Rollover Resistance: Special Report 265 Get This Book
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TRB Special Report 265 - An Assessment of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's Rating System for Rollover Resistance finds that the static stability factor is a useful indicator of a vehicle's propensity to roll over, but that U.S. government ratings for new cars, light trucks, and sport utility vehicles do not adequately reflect differences in rollover resistance shown by available crash data. According to the report, the five-star system should be revised to allow better discrimination among vehicles and incorporate results from road tests that measure vehicle control and handling characteristics.

Following the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA's) issuance of vehicle ratings to inform consumers about rollover risk, Congress requested a TRB study to evaluate the appropriateness of the rating system. Motor vehicle rollovers involving passenger cars, vans, pickup trucks, and sport utility vehicles result in approximately 10,000 deaths and 27,000 serious injuries each year in the United States. NHTSA developed a five-star rating system to inform consumers about the rollover resistance of passenger cars and light-duty passenger vehicle trucks.

After thoroughly evaluating NHTSA's development of the rating system, the committee that conducted this study concurred with the agency's reliance on a static measure of vehicle stability but pointed out some inadequacies of the statistical model used to relate this static measure to rollover risk. Alternative statistical approaches would provide a better approximation of risk. The rating system itself was found wanting. The procedures used to develop and test the ratings with consumers through focus groups did not provide credible evidence that consumers understood the message about the actual risk associated with a given vehicle. By being limited to only five levels, the system also discarded valuable information. The data developed by NHTSA could be refined to enable consumers to discriminate better among vehicle models with regard to their rollover experience.

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