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Suggested Citation:"Appendixes." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in the Children of Vietnam Veterans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10309.
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Appendix A Workshop on the Review of Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides (Third Biennial Update)

AML Review Session

PUBLIC WORKSHOP

October 18, 2001

Members Room, National Academy of Sciences

Washington, D.C.

Workshop Presentations and Speakers

Morbidity of Vietnam Veterans. Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) in Vietnam Veterans’ Children in Australia

Keith Horsley, M.D., Medical Services Adviser, Commonwealth Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Australia

Paul Jelfs, Ph.D., Head, Population Health Unit, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and Epidemiological consultant for the Department of Veterans’ Affairs

Paternal Military Service and Risk of Childhood Acute Leukemia

Xiao Ou Shu, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Center for Health Service Research, Nashville, Tennessee

Pesticides and Childhood Acute Leukemia: Results from a German Case-Control Study

Joachim Schüz, Ph.D., Institute for Medical Biometrics, Epidemiology and Informatics, University of Mainz, Germany

Suggested Citation:"Appendixes." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in the Children of Vietnam Veterans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10309.
×

Appendix B Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES

IRVA HERTZ-PICCIOTTO, Ph.D. (Chair), is professor in the Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; director of the Reproductive Epidemiology Program; and a fellow at the Carolina Population Center. She has published extensively on risk assessment, occupationally related cancer, environmental exposures, reproductive outcomes, and methods for epidemiologic data analysis. Dr. Hertz-Picciotto serves on several editorial boards and is currently president of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology.

MARGIT L. BLEECKER, M.D., Ph.D., is director of the Center for Occupational and Environmental Neurology in Baltimore. Her research interests are in the areas of clinical industrial neurotoxicology and occupational neurology. Dr. Bleecker recently served on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on the Safety of Silicone Breast Implants, and has served on the IOM Committee on the Evaluation of the Department of Defense Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Protocol and the IOM Committee on the Persian Gulf Syndrome Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Program.

THOMAS A. GASIEWICZ, Ph.D., is professor of Environmental Medicine and deputy director of the Environmental Health Sciences Center in the Department of Environmental Medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine. He serves on the editorial board of Biochemical Pharmacology and is the

Suggested Citation:"Appendixes." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in the Children of Vietnam Veterans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10309.
×

associate editor of Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology. He also is a peer reviewer for several scientific journals including Biochemical Pharmacology, Cancer Research, Fundamental and Applied Toxicology, Journal of Biological Chemistry, Science, and Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology. Dr. Gasiewicz has published extensively on the toxicokinetics of dioxin, dioxin toxicity, and the role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor in the molecular mechanism of dioxin toxicity.

TEE L. GUIDOTTI, M.D., M.P.H., holds the position of department chair, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health in the School of Public Health and Health Services of The George Washington University. He is also director of the Division of Occupational Medicine in the Department of Medicine of George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Science and is cross-appointed as professor of pulmonary medicine. Prior to accepting this position, he served as professor of occupational and environmental medicine and director of the Occupational Health Program in the Department of Public Health Sciences at the University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine, Edmonton. Dr. Guidotti is certified as a specialist in internal medicine, lung diseases, and occupational medicine. His primary research interests are air quality, inhalation toxicology, and occupational and environmental lung diseases. Dr. Guidotti is past president of the Association of Occupational and Environmental Clinics, and sits on the Board of Directors of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and of the International Commission on Occupational Health.

ROBERT F. HERRICK, Sc.D., is senior lecturer on industrial hygiene at the Harvard School of Public Health, where he earned a doctor of science in industrial hygiene. Dr. Herrick is certified in the comprehensive practice of industrial hygiene. His research interests are centered on the assessment of exposure as a cause of occupational and environmental disease. Dr. Herrick is past chair of the American Conference of Governmental and Industrial Hygienists, and past president of the International Occupational Hygiene Association. Prior to joining the faculty at Harvard, Dr. Herrick spent 17 years at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health where he conducted occupational health research.

DAVID G. HOEL, Ph.D., holds the position of distinguished university professor and associate director of the Hollings Oncology Center at the Medical University of South Carolina. Prior to that he held the posts of director of the Division of Biometry and Risk Assessment and acting director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Dr. Hoel has been a member of numerous working groups of the International Agency for Cancer Research of the World Health Organization. He also serves as chair of the IOM Committee on the Assessment of Wartime Exposure to Herbicides.

Suggested Citation:"Appendixes." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in the Children of Vietnam Veterans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10309.
×

LOREN D. KOLLER, D.V.M., Ph.D., served in academia for nearly 30 years, the last 16 as professor, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis. For 10 of those years he served as Dean of the College. He presently operates a business in environmental health and toxicology. Dr. Koller pioneered the discipline now known as immunotoxicology with a research focus also in the areas of toxicology, pathology, carcinogensis and risk assessment. He is on the IOM Committee on the Assessment of Wartime Exposure to Herbicides and served for six years as a member of the National Research Council, Committee on Toxicology.

HOWARD OZER, M.D., Ph.D., is Eason Chair and chief of the Hematology/ Oncology Section, director of the Cancer Center, and professor of medicine at the University of Oklahoma. Dr. Ozer is a member of several professional societies and has served on the Board of the Society for Biologic Therapy and the Governor’s Cancer Advisory Board for the State of Georgia. He serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Cancer Biotherapy; Cancer Research, Therapy and Control; Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals; and Emedicine; he is a reviewer for numerous journals including Cancer Research, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, and New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Ozer has published extensively on the treatment of hematologic malignancies.

JOHN J. STEGEMAN, Ph.D., is senior scientist and chair of the Department of Biology at the Redfield Lab of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. He received his Ph.D. in biochemistry, concentrating on enzymology, from Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. His research interests center on metabolism of foreign chemicals in animals and humans, and the structure, function, and regulation of the enzymes that accomplish this metabolism.

DAVID S. STROGATZ, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., is associate professor and chair, Department of Epidemiology at the University at Albany, State University of New York, and adjunct professor, Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He received his M.S.P.H and Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Dr. Strogatz’s research examines the epidemiology of diseases, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and the impact of socioeconomic status and race on health.

STAFF BIOGRAPHIES

ROSE MARIE MARTINEZ, Sc.D., is director of the IOM Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. Prior to joining IOM, she was a senior health researcher at Mathematica Policy Research, where she conducted research on the impact of health system change on the public health infrastructure, access to care

Suggested Citation:"Appendixes." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in the Children of Vietnam Veterans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10309.
×

for vulnerable populations, managed care, and the health care work force. Dr. Martinez is a former assistant director for health financing and policy with the U.S. General Accounting Office, where she directed evaluations and policy analysis in the area of national and public health issues. Dr. Martinez received her doctorate from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health.

DAVID A. BUTLER, Ph.D., is a senior project officer in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in engineering from the University of Rochester and a Ph.D. in public policy analysis from Carnegie–Mellon University. Prior to joining IOM, Dr. Butler served as an analyst for the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment and was Research Associate in the Department of Environmental Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. He previously served as study director for the Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 1996, …Update 1998, and …Update 2000 reports as well as other environmental health and risk assessment projects for the National Academies.

JENNIFER A. COHEN is a research assistant in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. She received her undergraduate degree in art history from the University of Maryland. She has been involved with the IOM committees that produced Organ Procurement and Transplantation, Clearing the Air: Asthma and Indoor Air Exposures, Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes, and Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2000.

ANNA B. STATON is a research assistant in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. Ms. Staton joined the IOM in December 1999 and has also worked with the committees that produced No Time to Lose: Getting More from HIV Prevention and Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2000. Prior to joining the IOM, she worked at the Baltimore Women’s Health Study. Ms. Staton graduated from the University of Maryland Baltimore County with a bachelor of arts degree in visual arts (major) and women’s studies (minor). She is currently working toward a master of public administration at The George Washington University School of Business and Public Management.

ELIZABETH J. ALBRIGO is a project assistant in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medicine. She received her undergraduate degree in psychology from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. In addition to her work on this study she is currently involved with the following IOM committees: the Committee on the Review of the USDA E.coli O157:H7 Draft Farm-to-Table Process Risk Assessment, and the Committee on the Assessment of Wartime Exposure to Herbicides in Vietnam.

Suggested Citation:"Appendixes." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in the Children of Vietnam Veterans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10309.
×
Page 26
Suggested Citation:"Appendixes." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in the Children of Vietnam Veterans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10309.
×
Page 27
Suggested Citation:"Appendixes." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in the Children of Vietnam Veterans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10309.
×
Page 28
Suggested Citation:"Appendixes." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in the Children of Vietnam Veterans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10309.
×
Page 29
Suggested Citation:"Appendixes." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in the Children of Vietnam Veterans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10309.
×
Page 30
Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in the Children of Vietnam Veterans Get This Book
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In 2001, in response to a request by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA), the Institute of Medicine (IOM) called together a committee to conduct a review of the scientific evidence regarding the association between exposure to dioxin and other chemical compounds in herbicides used in Vietnam and acute myelogenous leukemia in the offspring of Vietnam veterans. Based on the scientific evidence reviewed in this report, the committee finds there is inadequate or insufficient evidence to determine if an association exists between exposure to the herbicides used in Vietnam or their contaminants and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in the children of Vietnam veterans. This is a change in classification from the recent Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2000 report, which found limited/suggestive evidence for such an association.

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