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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2002. Improving Learning with Information Technology: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10352.
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References

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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2002. Improving Learning with Information Technology: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10352.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2002. Improving Learning with Information Technology: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10352.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2002. Improving Learning with Information Technology: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10352.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2002. Improving Learning with Information Technology: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10352.
×
Page 56
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2002. Improving Learning with Information Technology: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10352.
×
Page 57
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2002. Improving Learning with Information Technology: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10352.
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Page 58
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In spring 2000, representatives from the U.S. Department of Education (DOEd) and senior staff at the National Research Council (NRC) recognized a common frustration: that the potential of information technology to transform K-12 education remains unrealized. In fall 2000 the U.S. DOEd formally requested that the National Academies undertake an interdisciplinary project called Improving Learning with Information Technology (ILIT). The project was launched with a symposium on January 24-25, 2001. This report summarizes the proceedings of the symposium and is intended for people interested in considering better strategies for using information technology in the educational arena. While it offers insights from the presenters on both the challenges to and the opportunities for forging a better dialogue among learning scientists, technologists, and educators, it does not contain conclusions or recommendations. Rather, it highlights issues to consider, constituents to engage, and strategies to employ in the effort to build a coalition to harness the power of information technologies for the improvement of American education. Every effort has been made to convey the speakers' content and viewpoints accurately. Recognizing the speculative nature of many of the speaker contributions, most attributions identify a speaker by area of expertise rather than by name. The report reflects the proceedings of the workshop and is not intended to be a comprehensive review of all the issues involved in the project to improve learning with information technology.

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