National Academies Press: OpenBook

The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs (2002)

Chapter: Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters

« Previous: Appendix A: Committee Meetings and Presenters of Testimony
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2002. The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10411.
×

Appendix B
Workshop Agendas and Presenters

Workshop on Functional Capacity and Work Requirements as It Relates to SSA’s Disability Decision Process Research

June 4–5, 1998

Committee to Review SSA’s Disability Decision Process Research

National Academy of Sciences/Institute of Medicine

Cecil and Ida Green Building, Conference Room 104

2001 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C.

FINAL AGENDA

Thursday, June 4

8:30–9:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

9:00–9:15 a.m.

Welcome and Introduction

Dorothy Rice, Chair

9:15–9:25 a.m.

Purpose and Goals of the Workshop

Dorothy Rice

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2002. The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10411.
×

OPENING SESSION

9:25–10:30 a.m.

Measuring Functional Capacity of Persons with Disabilities in Light of Emerging Demands in the Workplace

(Commentary and discussion will follow)

Paper Presented By:

Edward Yelin

Discussant:

Janet Norwood

10:30–10:45 a.m.

Coffee Break

SESSION ONE

10:45–12:30 p.m.

Linking Components of Functional Capacity Domains (Cognitive, Psychosocial, Motor and Sensory/Perceptual) with Work Requirements

  • What are the specific components of the functional capacity domains?

  • How are the specific components linked to demands of work?

  • Is it possible to develop a baseline of work requirements? Can O*NET be used or adapted to meet SSA’s need for an occupational classification system?

Discussion Leader:

Howard Goldman

Discussants:

Edwin Fleishman

Cille Kennedy

12:30–1:30 p.m.

Lunch in Refectory

SESSION TWO

1:30–3:30 p.m.

Desired Characteristics of Instruments to Measure Functional Capacity to Work

  • What are the strengths and limitations of self-reports, proxy reports, performance testing, and clinical observation?

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2002. The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10411.
×

 

  • How do the strengths and weaknesses of different measurement approaches vary across the different domains of functioning?

  • To what extent should assistive devices be considered in measuring functional capacity?

  • Do different populations have different measurement requirements (e.g., schizophrenia vs. arthritis vs. spinal injury vs. Alzheimer’s disease)?

Discussion Leader:

Alan Jette

Discussants:

Allen Heinemann

Constantine Lyketsos

3:30–3:45 p.m.

Coffee Break

SESSION THREE

3:45–4:45 p.m.

The Use of Functional Capacity Measures in Public and Private Programs in the United States and in Other Countries

  • What has been their experience in the use of functional capacity measures in determining disability?

  • What aspects of their measurement of functional capacity might be relevant for SSA’s needs?

Discussion Leader:

Patricia Owens

Discussants:

Richard Burkhauser

Ian Basnett

4:45–5:30 p.m.

General Discussion

5:30 p.m.

Adjourn—Reception

6:30 p.m.

Dinner for Committee Members and Invited Guests

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2002. The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10411.
×

Friday, June 5

SESSION FOUR

8:30–9:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

9:00–10:15 a.m.

Adapting Measurement of Functional Capacity to Work to SSA’s Disability Decision Process

  • What are the criteria for a “successful” measurement of functional capacity to work?

  • Feasibility and practicality of designing and administering (i.e., safety, cost, etc.) measures of functional capacity to work.

  • Technical issues of incorporating reliability, validity, sensitivity, and specificity in the context of SSA’s disability decision process.

  • How can these measurement approaches be linked to work requirements in the context of SSA’s disability decision process?

Discussion Leader:

Virginia Reno

Discussants:

Lisa Iezzoni

David Stapleton

10:15–10:30 a.m.

Coffee Break

10:30–11:00 a.m.

Rapporteur’s Review of Major Issues Identified

Jane West

Kristen Robinson

11:00–12:00 p.m.

General Discussion

12:00–12:15 p.m.

Concluding Remarks

Dorothy Rice

12:15 p.m.

Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2002. The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10411.
×

Workshop on Survey Measurement of Work Disability: Challenges for Survey Design and Method

May 27–28, 1999

Committee to Review SSA’s Disability Decision Process Research

National Academy of Sciences/Institute of Medicine

Holiday Inn-Georgetown, Mirage I

2101 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C.

AGENDA

Thursday, May 27

8:30–9:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

9:00–9:15 a.m.

Welcome and Introduction

Dorothy Rice, Chair

9:15–9:30 a.m.

Welcoming Remarks

Jane Ross, Deputy Commissioner, SSA

SESSION ONE

9:30–10:30 a.m.

Overview of the Two Background Papers: Opportunities for Methodological Research on Survey Measures Related to Disability

An examination of the various conceptual models of disability and the disablement process and their ability to address SSA’s disability program requirements.

  • The challenges related to the translation of conceptual models to valid and reliable questions that can be administered to the general population.

  • The identification of the coverage, nonresponse, and measurement error properties of current measures of work disability.

  • Potential problems in cross-walking among measures of disability collected in a variety of settings and under varying survey conditions.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2002. The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10411.
×

 

Elizabeth Badley

Alan Jette

Nancy Mathiowetz

Contributors:

Allan Sampson

10:30–10:45 a.m.

Coffee Break

SESSION TWO

10:45 a.m.–12:00 noon

Implications of Different Concepts for Survey Measurement Problems

  • How do the various conceptual models address the dynamic nature of disability and how do these models address SSA’s disability program requirements?

  • How do the various conceptual models address the role of environment, adaptation, expectations, and perceptions?

  • What measurement gaps exist between the various conceptual models of disability and the current set of disability measures used in federal surveys?

Discussion Leader:

Robert Groves

Contributors:

Ellen MacKenzie

Allan Hunt

12:00 noon–1:00 p.m.

Lunch in Kaleidoscope Room

(Committee members and invited guests)

SESSION THREE

1:00–2:00 p.m.

Sampling, Accessing, and Measuring People with Disabilities

  • To what extent do varying modes and methods of data collection facilitate participation among persons with disabilities?

  • If access to a person with a work disability is limited (due to the interface between the survey design and the nature of the disability), how is the measurement of disability affected by the role

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2002. The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10411.
×

 

  • of the proxy respondent—caregiver as respondent, other proxy respondent? Can trade-offs be assessed between nonresponse and measurement errors?

  • What gaps exist in our knowledge of the relative impact of coverage, nonresponse, and measurement error on estimates of disability?

Discussion Leader:

Colm O’Muircheartaigh

Contributors:

Lawrence Branch

Ronald Kessler

SESSION FOUR

2:00–3:00 p.m.

Questionnaire Development Issues for Measures of Work Disability

  • In light of developments related to the integration of cognitive theory and survey methodology, how should measures of work disability be evaluated?

  • How does the dynamic nature of disability and the disablement process impact the measurement of work disability?

  • How is measurement affected by the role of the person providing the information—self-respondent, caregiver as respondent, or other proxy reporters?

  • To what extent should we look to statistical modeling related to scale reduction as a means for reducing the effects of measurement error?

  • How will the measurement of work disability in a variety of settings (the DES and other ongoing federal data collection efforts) impact SSA’s ability to monitor the pool of people potentially eligible for disability benefits?

  • What research needs to be conducted to develop robust measures of work disability and to address the gaps in our knowledge about the measurement error properties of current measures?

Discussion Leader:

Seymour Sudman

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2002. The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10411.
×

 

Contributors:

Roger Tourangeau

Jack McNeil

3:00–3:30 p.m.

Coffee Break

SESSION FIVE

3:30–5:00 p.m.

Role of Environment in Survey Measurement of Disability

  • How is the measurement of work disability affected by environment, perceptions, and expectations?

  • Is there a differential impact of environment on the reporting of disability as a function of the role of the person providing the information—self-respondent, caregiver, or other proxy respondent?

  • What do we know about the measurement of the role of environment, expectations, and perceptions with respect to the various sources of survey error, specifically, nonresponse and measurement error?

  • What gaps exist in our knowledge of how to adequately measure environment and its impact on the measurement of work disability? What research needs to be conducted to address these gaps?

Discussion Leader:

David Gray

Contributors:

Sandra Berry

Lois Verbrugge

5:00–5:30 p.m.

General Discussion

5:40–6:40 p.m.

Adjourn—Reception for all attendees

6:45 p.m.

Dinner in Kaleidoscope Room

(Committee members and invited guests)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2002. The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10411.
×
Friday, May 28

SESSION SIX

8:30–9:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

9:00–10:30 a.m.

Defining a Research Agenda

  • What are the criteria for a “successful” measurement of functional capacity to work?

  • Feasibility and practicality of designing and administering (i.e., safety, cost, etc.) measures of functional capacity to work.

  • Technical issues of incorporating reliability, validity, sensitivity, and specificity in the context of SSA’s disability decision process.

  • How can these measurement approaches be linked to work requirements in the context of SSA’s disability decision process?

Discussion Chair:

Dorothy Rice

10:30–10:45 a.m.

Break

10:45 a.m.–12:00 noon

General Discussion

Moderator:

Robert Groves

12:00–12:15 p.m

Concluding Remarks

Dorothy Rice

12:15 p.m.

Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2002. The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10411.
×
Page 161
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2002. The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10411.
×
Page 162
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2002. The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10411.
×
Page 163
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2002. The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10411.
×
Page 164
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2002. The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10411.
×
Page 165
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2002. The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10411.
×
Page 166
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2002. The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10411.
×
Page 167
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2002. The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10411.
×
Page 168
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agendas and Presenters." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2002. The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10411.
×
Page 169
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The Society Security disability program faces urgent challenges: more people receiving benefits than ever before, the prospect of even more claimants as baby boomers age, changing attitudes culminating in the Americans With Disabilities Act. Disability is now understood as a dynamic process, and Social Security must comprehend that process to plan adequately for the times ahead. The Dynamics of Disability provides expert analysis and recommendations in key areas:

  • Understanding the current social, economic, and physical environmental factors in determining eligibility for disability benefits.
  • Developing and implementing a monitoring system to measure and track trends in work disability.
  • Improving the process for making decisions on disability claims.
  • Building Social Security’s capacity for conducting needed research.

This book provides a wealth of detail on the workings of the Social Security disability program, recent and emerging disability trends, issues and previous experience in researching disability, and more. It will be of primary interest to federal policy makers, the Congress, and researchers—and it will be useful to state disability officials, medical and rehabilitation professionals, and the disability community.

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