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Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Research Council. 2002. Making the Nation Safer: The Role of Science and Technology in Countering Terrorism. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10415.
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Bibliography

Advisory Panel to Assess Domestic Response Capabilities for Terrorism Involving Weapons of Mass Destruction (Gilmore Commission). 2000. Second Annual Report to the President and the Congress, December 15.

Advisory Panel to Assess Domestic Response Capabilities for Terrorism Involving Weapons of Mass Destruction (Gilmore Commission). 2001. Third Annual Report to the President and the Congress, December 15.


Boettcher, Mike, and Ingrid Arnesen. 2002. “Al Qaeda Documents Outline Serious Weapons Program,” CNN, January 25. Available online at <http://www.cnn.com/2002/US/01/24/inv.al.qaeda.documents/index.html>.

Broad, William J. 2002. “U.S. Tightening Rules on Keeping Scientific Secrets,” N.Y. Times, February 17.


Carter, Ashton B. 2001-02. “The Architecture of Government in the Face of Terrorism,” International Security, Vol. 26, No. 2, Winter, pp. 5-23.

Carter, Ashton B., and William J. Perry. 1999. Preventive Defense: A New Security Strategy for America, Brookings Institution, Washington, D.C.

Commission to Assess the Organization of the Federal Government to Combat the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction (Deutch Commission). 1999. Combating Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction, July 14.

Commission on the Roles and Capabilities of the United States Intelligence Community (Brown Commission). 1996. Preparing for the 21st Century—An Appraisal of U.S. Intelligence, March.


Diamond, Jared. 2002. “Why We Must Feed the Hands That Could Bite Us,” Washington Post, January 13.


Garwin, Richard L. 2001. “The Many Threats of Terror,” New York Review of Books, October 2.

Garwin, Richard L. 2001. “The Many Threats of Terror: An Epilogue, New York Review of Books, December 22.

Garwin, Richard L., Ralph E. Gomory, and Matthew S. Meselson. 2002. “How to Fight Bioterrorism,” Washington Post, May 14.

Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Research Council. 2002. Making the Nation Safer: The Role of Science and Technology in Countering Terrorism. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10415.
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The Heritage Foundation Homeland Security Task Force. 2002. Defending the American Homeland, chaired by L. Paul Bremer III and Edwin Meese III, January. Available online at <http://www.heritage.org/homelanddefense/welcome.html>.

Holton, Gerald. 2002. “Reflections on Modern Terrorism,” Edge. Revision, at certain points, of a paper with the same title, presented at the Conference on Terrorism, held at Stanford, California, 1976, and published in TERRORISM: An International Journal, Vol. 1, No. 3/4, 1978, pp. 265-276. Available online at <http://www.edge.org/3rd_culture/holton/holton_print.html>.

Homeland Security Council. 2001. Homeland Security Presidential Directive–1, Subject: Organization and Operation of the Homeland Security Council, October 29.

Homer-Dixon, Thomas. 2002. “The Rise of Complex Terrorism,” Foreign Policy: The Magazine of Global Politics, Economics, and Ideas, January/February.

Huber, Peter, and Mark P. Mills. 2002. “How Technology Will Defeat Terrorism,” City Journal, Winter, Vol. 12, No. 1. Available online at <http://www.city-journal.org/html/12_1_how_tech.html>.


Joint Task Force on Intelligence and Law Enforcement (Richards/Rindskopf Report). 1995. Report to the Attorney General and the Director of Central Intelligence , May.


Knezo, Genevieve J. 2001. Federal Research and Development for Counter Terrorism: Organization, Funding, and Options, November 26 (updated January 3, 2002), Order Code RL31202.

Knezo, Genevieve J. 2002. Possible Impacts of Major Counter Terrorism Security Actions on Research, Development, and Higher Education, Congressional Research Service, April 8. Available online at <http://www.fas.org/irp/crs/RL31354.pdf>.


Lewis, Bernard. 1990. “The Roots of Muslim Rage,” The Atlantic, September.

Lewis, Bernard. 1993. Islam and the West, Oxford University Press, Inc., New York.


National Commission on Terrorism (Bremer Commission). 2000. Countering the Changing Threat of International Terrorism, September.

National Science Board, National Science Foundation. 2002. Science and Engineering Indicators—2002, Volume 1, NSB-02-1, Arlington, Va., U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. Available online at <http://www.nsf.gov/sbe/srs/seind02/start.htm>.

National Science Board, National Science Foundation. 2002. Science and Engineering Indicators—2002, Volume 2, NSB-02-2, Arlington, Va., U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. Available online at <http://www.nsf.gov/sbe/srs/seind02/start.htm>.

Nye, Joseph S. 2001. “How to Protect the Homeland,” New York Times, September 25.


Office of Management and Budget. 2001. Annual Report to Congress on Combating Terrorism, August. Available online at <http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/legislative/nsd_annual_report2001.pdf>.

Office of Technology Assessment. 1991. Technology Against Terrorism: The Federal Effort, OTA-ISC-487, July. Available online at <http://www.wws.princeton.edu/~ota/disk1/1991/9139_n.html>.

O’Hanlon, Michael E., Peter R. Orszag, Ivo H. Daalder, I.M. Destler, David L. Gunter, Robert E. Litan, and James B. Steinberg. 2002. Protecting the American Homeland: A Preliminary Analysis, Brookings Institution Press, Washington, D.C., May.


The President’s Commission on Critical Infrastructure Protection (Marsh Commission). 1997. Critical Foundations, October.


Ronfeldt, David, and John Arquila, eds. 2001. Networks and Netwars: The Future of Terror, Crime, and Militancy, RAND, Santa Monica, Calif.


Singer, Maxine. 2002. “The Challenge to Science: How to Mobilize American Ingenuity,” The Age of Terror: America and the World Sfter September 11, Strobe Talbott and Nauan Chanda, eds., Basic Books, New York.


U.S. Commission on National Security/21st Century (Hart-Rudman Commission, Phase III). 2001. Road Map for National Security: Imperative for Change, February 15.

U.S. Department of State. 2002. Patterns of Global Terrorism 2001, Counterterrorism Office, Washington, D.C., May 21. Available online at <www.state.gov/s/ct/rls/pgtrpt/2001/html>.

Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Research Council. 2002. Making the Nation Safer: The Role of Science and Technology in Countering Terrorism. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10415.
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Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Research Council. 2002. Making the Nation Safer: The Role of Science and Technology in Countering Terrorism. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10415.
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Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Research Council. 2002. Making the Nation Safer: The Role of Science and Technology in Countering Terrorism. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10415.
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Page 373
Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Research Council. 2002. Making the Nation Safer: The Role of Science and Technology in Countering Terrorism. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10415.
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Page 374
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Making the Nation Safer: The Role of Science and Technology in Countering Terrorism Get This Book
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Vulnerabilities abound in U.S. society. The openness and efficiency of our key infrastructures – transportation, information and telecommunications systems, health systems, the electric power grid, emergency response units, food and water supplies, and others – make them susceptible to terrorist attacks. Making the Nation Safer discusses technical approaches to mitigating these vulnerabilities.

A broad range of topics are covered in this book, including:

  • Nuclear and radiological threats, such as improvised nuclear devices and “dirty bombs;”
  • Bioterrorism, medical research, agricultural systems and public health;
  • Toxic chemicals and explosive materials;
  • Information technology, such as communications systems, data management, cyber attacks, and identification and authentication systems;
  • Energy systems, such as the electrical power grid and oil and natural gas systems;
  • Transportation systems;
  • Cities and fixed infrastructures, such as buildings, emergency operations centers, and tunnels;
  • The response of people to terrorism, such as how quality of life and morale of the population can be a target of terrorists and how people respond to terrorist attacks; and
  • Linked infrastructures, i.e. the vulnerabilities that result from the interdependencies of key systems;

In each of these areas, there are recommendations on how to immediately apply existing knowledge and technology to make the nation safer and on starting research and development programs that could produce innovations that will strengthen key systems and protect us against future threats. The book also discusses issues affecting the government’s ability to carry out the necessary science and engineering programs and the important role of industry, universities, and states, counties, and cities in homeland security efforts.

A long term commitment to homeland security is necessary to make the nation safer, and this book lays out a roadmap of how science and engineering can assist in countering terrorism.

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