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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2002. Using Human Resource Data to Track Innovation: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10475.
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References

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Hill, Susan T. 1999. Science and Engineering Doctorate Awards: 1998. NSF 00-304. Arlington, VA: National Science Foundation.


Kannankutty, Nirmala. 1999. SESTAT and NIOEM: Two Federal Databases Provide Complementary Information on the Science and Technology Labor Force. NSF 99-349. Arlington, VA: National Science Foundation.

Kannankutty, Nirmala, and R. Keith Wilkinson. 1999. SESTAT: A Tool for Studying Scientists and Engineers in the United States. NSF 99-337. Arlington, VA: National Science Foundation.


Morgan, Robert, Carlos Kruytbusch, and Nirmala Kannankutty. 2001. “Patenting and Invention Activity of U.S. Scientists and Engineers in the Academic Sector: Comparisons with Industry,” Journal of Technology Transfer, vol. 26, Jan. 2001, pp. 173-83.


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National Research Council. 1997. Industrial Research and Innovation Indicators. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press

National Research Council. 1999a. Securing America’s Industrial Strength. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press; 1999b. U.S. Industry in 2000: Studies in Competitive Performance Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

National Research Council. 2000a. Time-Use Measurement and Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2002. Using Human Resource Data to Track Innovation: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10475.
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National Research Council. 2000b. Measuring the Science and Engineering Enterprise, Priorities for the Division of Science Resource Studies. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

National Research Council. 2001. Trends in Federal Support of Research and Graduate Education. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.


Powell, Walter W., Kenneth W. Koput, Laurel Smith Doerr, and Jason Owen Smith. 1998. “Network Position and Firm Performance: Organizational Returns to Collaboration in the Technology Industry.” Unpublished paper.


Sanderson, Allen R., and Bernard Dugoni. 1999. Summary Report 1997: Doctorate Recipients from United States Universities. Chicago, IL: National Opinion Research Center, University of Chicago.

Siegel, Donald. 1999. Skill-Based Technological Change: Evidence from a Firm-Level Survey. Kalamazoo, MI: W.E. Upjohn Institute Press.

Siegel, Donald, David Waldman, and Albert Link. 1999. “Assessing the Impact of Organizational Practices on the Productivity of University Technology Transfer Offices: An Exploratory Study.” NBER Working Paper No. 7256. July.


Zucker, Lynne G., Michael R. Darby, and Marilynn B. Brewer. 1994. “Intellectual Capital and the Birth of U.S. Biotechnology Enterprises.” NBER Working Paper No. 4653.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2002. Using Human Resource Data to Track Innovation: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10475.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2002. Using Human Resource Data to Track Innovation: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10475.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2002. Using Human Resource Data to Track Innovation: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10475.
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Page 33
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2002. Using Human Resource Data to Track Innovation: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10475.
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Page 34
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Despite the fact that technology is embodied in human as well as physical capital and that interactions among technically trained people are critical to innovation and technology diffusion, data on scientists, engineers and other professionals have not been adequately exploited to illuminate the productivity of and changing patterns in innovation. STEP convened a workshop to examine how data on qualifications and career paths, mobility, cross sector relationships, and the structure of work in firms could shed light on issues of research productivity, interactions among private and public sector institutions, and other aspects of innovation.

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