National Academies Press: OpenBook

Health Insurance is a Family Matter (2002)

Chapter: Appendix D: Data Tables

« Previous: Appendix C: Research Review: Health Care Access, Utilization, and Outcomes for Children, Pregnant Women, and Infants
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

D
Data Tables

TABLE D.1 Federal Poverty Guidelines, 2000 and 2001

 

Federal Poverty Level (FPL)

FPL for 2000

FPL for 2001

Family Size in 48 Contiguous States

100% FPL

200% FPL

300% FPL

100% FPL

200% FPL

300% FPL

1 person

$8,350

$16,700

$25,050

$8,590

$17,180

$25,770

2 persons

$11,250

$22,500

$33,750

$11,610

$23,220

$34,830

3 persons

$14,150

$28,300

$42,450

$14,630

$29,260

$43,890

4 persons

$17,050

$34,100

$51,150

$17,650

$35,300

$52,950

 

SOURCE: DHHS, 2002.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

TABLE D.2 Medicaid Income Eligibility Limits and Upper Federal Poverty Level by Program by State, 2001

States

Medicaid Annual Income-Eligibility Threshold (2 Child Family)a

Medicaid Poverty-level Childrenb,c

U.S. total

$9,672

 

Alabama

$3,048

0-6 from 15 to 133%

6-17 from 15 to 100%

Alaska

$14,496

0-6 from 71 to 200%

6-17 from 71 to 200%

Arizona

$5,244

Infants from 38 to 140%

1-6 from 38 to 133%

6-17 from 38 to 100%

Arkansas

$4,380

Infants up to 200%

1-14 up to 200%

California

$15,708

Infants from 86 to 200%

1-6 from 86 to 133%

6-17 from 86 to 100%

Colorado

$6,132

0-6 from 39 to 133%

6-17 from 39 to 100%

Connecticut

$10,392

0-17 from 0 to 185%

Delaware

$15,708

Infants from 0 to 185%

1-6 from 0 to 133%

6-18 from 0 to 100%

District of Columbia

$29,256

Infants from 0 to 200%

1-5 from 0 to 200%

6-17 from 0 to 200%

Florida

$9,672

Infants from 28 to 200%

1-6 from 28 to 133%

6-17 from 28 to 100%

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

Upper FPL by Program

Medicaid SCHIP (Title XXI)b,c

Separate SCHIP (Title XXI)b

17-18 from 15 to 100

0-6 from 133 to 200%

6-17 from 100 to 200%

17-18 from 100 to 200%

0-6 from 133 to 200%

6-17 from 100 to 200%

17-18 from 71 to 200%

No program

No program

Infants from 140 to 200%

1-6 from 133 to 200%

6-17 from 100 to 200%

17-18 from 38 to 200%

Children aged 17 up to 100%

No program

17-18 from 86 to 100%

Infants 200 to 250%

1-6 from 133 to 250%

6-17 from 100 to 250%

17-18 from 100 to 250%

AIM program, 0-2 from 250 to 300%

No program

0-6 from 133 to 185%

6-17 from 100 to 185%

17-18 from 39 to 185%

17-18 from 0 to 185%

0 to 18 from 185 to 300%

No program

Infants from 185 to 200%

1-6 from 133 to 200%

6-18 from 100 to 200%

Infants from 185 to 200%

1-5 from 133 to 200%

6-14 from 100 to 200%

17-18 from 50 to 200%

No program

Infants from 185 to 200%

17-18 from 28 to 100%

Infants up to 200%

1-6 from 133 to 200%

6-18 from 100 to 200%

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

States

Medicaid Annual Income-Eligibility Threshold (2 Child Family)a

Medicaid Poverty-level Childrenb,c

Georgia

$6,168

Infants up to 185%

1-6 up to 133%

6-18 up to 100%

Hawaii

$16,836

Infants from 0 to 185%

1-6 from 0 to 100%

6-16 from 0 to 100%

17-19 up to 200%

Idaho

$4,884

0-6 up to 150%

6-19 up to 150%

Illinois

$10,584

Infants up to 200%

1-5 from 42 to 133%

6-17 from 42 to 133%

Indiana

$4,536

Infants up to 150%

1-6 up to 150%

6-18 up to 150%

Iowa

$12,780

Infants up to 200%

1-6 up to 133%

6-18 up to 133%

Kansas

$5,916

Infants up to 150%

1-6 up to 133%

6-18 up to 100%

Kentucky

$10,908

Infants from 33 to 185%

1-6 from 33 to 150%

6-17 from 33 to 150%

Louisiana

$3,876

0-6 up to 150%

6-18 up to 150%

Maine

$15,708

Infants up to 150%

1-6 up to 150%

6-16 up to 150%

17-19 up to 100%

Maryland

$6,288

Infants up to 200%

1-17 up to 200%

17-18 up to 200%

Massachusetts

$19,452

Infants up to 200%

1-18 up to 150%

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

Upper FPL by Program

Medicaid SCHIP (Title XXI)b,c

Separate SCHIP (Title XXI)b

No program

Infants from 185 to 235%

1-6 from 133 to 235%

6-18 from 100 to 235%

No program

No program

0-3 from 133 to 150%

6-19 from 100 to 150%

No program

6-17 from 100 to 133%

17-18 from 42 to 133%

0-18 from 133 to 185%

1-6 from 133 to 150%

6-17 from 100 to 150%

17-18 up to 150%

0-18 from 150 to 200%

6-18 from 100 to 133%

Infants from 185 to 200%

1-18 from 133 to 200%

No program

Infants from 150 to 200%

1-6 from 133 to 200%

6-18 from 100 to 200%

17-18 from 33 to 150%

Infants from 185 to 200%

1-6 from 133 to 200%

6-18 from 100 to 200%

0-6 from 133 to 150%

6-18 from 100 to 150%

No program

0-6 from 133 to 150%

6-18 from 125 to 150%

Infants from 185 to 200%

1-18 from 150 to 200%

Infants from 185 to 200%

1-17 from 133 to 200%

17-18 from 100 to 200%

No program

Infants from 185 to 200%

1-18 from 133 to 150%

1-18 from 200 to 400%

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

States

Medicaid Annual Income-Eligibility Threshold (2 Child Family)a

Medicaid Poverty-level Childrenb,c

Michigan

$7,464

Infants up to 185%

1-17 up to 150%

Minnesota

$40,224

0-2 from 60 to 280%

2-5 from 60 to 275%

6-17 from 60 to 275%

Mississippi

$5,496

Infants up to 185%

1-6 up to 133%

6-17 up to 100%

Missouri

$15,708

Infants up to 300%

1-6 up to 300%

6-18 up to 300%

Montana

$10,032

0-6 from 40.5 to 133%

6-16 from 40.5 to 100%

17-19 from 40.5 to 71%

Nebraska

$6,420

Infants up to 185%

1-6 up to 185%

6-18 up to 185%

Nevada

$12,660

0-6 from 42 to 133%

6-16 from 42 to 100%

17-19 from 42 to 89%

New Hampshire

$9,780

Infants up to 300%

1-18 up to 185%

New Jersey

$6,396

Infants from 45 to 185%

1-6 from 45 to 133%

6-19 from 45 to 133%

New Mexico

$8,448

0-19 up to 235%

New York

$11,688

Infants up to 185%

1-6 up to 133%

7-19 up to 100%

North Carolina

$9,000

Infants up to 185%

1-6 up to 133%

6-18 up to 100%

North Dakota

$11,856

0-6 from 65 to 133%

6-17 from 65 to 100%

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

Upper FPL by Program

Medicaid SCHIP (Title XXI)b,c

Separate SCHIP (Title XXI)b

17-19 up to 150%

Infants from 185 to 200%

1-18 from 150 to 200%

0-2 from 275 to 280%

No program

17-18 up to 100%

Infants from 185 to 200%

1-6 from 133 to 200%

6-18 from 100 to 200%

Infants from 185 to 300%

1-6 from 133 to 300%

6-18 from 100 to 300%

No program

No program

0-6 from 133 to 150%

6-17 from 100 to 150%

17-18 from 40.5 to 150%

Infants from 150 to 185%

1-6 from 133 to 185%

6-18 from 100 to 185%

No program

No program

0-6 from 133 to 200%

6-17 from 100 to 200%

17-18 from 42 to 200%

Infants 185 to 300%

1-18 from 185 to 300%

6-17 from 100 to 133%

17-18 from 45 to 133%

Infants from 185 to 350%

1-6 from 133 to 350%

6-18 from 133 to 350%

0-18 from 185 to 235%

No program

17-18 medically needy up to 100%

Infants from 185 to 250%

1-6 from 133 to 250%

7-18 from 100 to 250%

No program

Infants from 185 to 200%

1-6 from 133 to 200%

6-18 from 100 to 200%

17-19 from 65 to 100%

0-6 from 133 to 140%

6-18 from 100 to 140%

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

States

Medicaid Annual Income-Eligibility Threshold (2 Child Family)a

Medicaid Poverty-level Childrenb,c

Ohio

$14,628

0-18 up to 200%

Oklahoma

$7,092

Infants up to 185%

1-6 up to 185%

6-17 up to 185%

Oregon

$14,628

Infants up to 133%

1-6 up to 133%

6-18 up to 100%

Pennsylvania

$6,684

Infants from 41 to 185%

1-6 from 41 to 133%

6-17 from 41 to 100%

17-19 up to 71%

Rhode Island

$28,140

0-8 up to 250%

8-15 up to 250%

South Carolina

$8,016

Infants from 50 to 185%

1-6 from 50 to 150%

6-17 from 50 to 150%

South Dakota

$9,552

0-6 up to 140%

6-19 up to 140%

Tennessee

$11,160

Infants up to 185%

1-6 up to 133%

6-17 up to 100%

Texas

$4,740

Infants up to 185%

1-6 up to 133%

6-18 up to 100%

Utah

$8,076

0-6 up to 133%

6-19 up to 100%

Vermont

$28,140

0-18 up to 300%

Virginia

$5,376

0-6 up to 133%

6-18 up to 100%

Washington

$29,256

0-18 up to 200%

West Virginia

$4,560

Infants up to 150%

1-6 up to 150%

6-18 up to 100%

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

Upper FPL by Program

Medicaid SCHIP (Title XXI)b,c

Separate SCHIP (Title XXI)b

0-18 from 150 to 200%

No program

Infants from 150 to 185%

1-6 from 133 to 185%

15-17 from 100 to 185%

No program

No program

1-6 from 133 to 170%

6-18 from 100 to 170%

0-8 up to 250%

Infants from 185 to 200%

1-6 from 133 to 200%

6-17 from 100 to 200%

17-18 from 41 to 200%

8-15 from 100 to 250%

15-18 up to 250%

No program

1-6 from 133 to 150%

6-17 from 100 to 150%

17-18 from 50 to 150%

No program

0-6 from 133 to 140%

6-19 from 100 to 140%

No program

17-18 up to 100%

0-19 up to 400%

17-18 up to 100%

Infants from 185 to 200%

1-6 from 133 to 200%

6-18 from 100 to 200%

No program

0-6 from 133 to 200%

6-18 from 100 to 200%

No program

0-18 from 235 to 300%

No program

0-6 from 133 to 185%

6-18 from 100 to 185%

No program

0-18 from 200 to 250%

No program

1-6 from 133 to 150%

6-18 from 100 to 150%

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

States

Medicaid Annual Income-Eligibility Threshold (2 Child Family)a

Medicaid Poverty-level Childrenb,c

Wisconsin

$27,060

0-6 up to 185%

6-19 up to 185%

Wyoming

$9,480

0-5 up to 133%

6-17 up to 100%

17-19 up to 67%

NOTE: AIM = Access for Infants and Mothers; SCHIP = State Children’s Health Insurance Program.

aBroaddus et al., 2002.

bKaye and Flowers, 2002.

cMaloy et al., 2002.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

Upper FPL by Program

Medicaid SCHIP (Title XXI)b,c

Separate SCHIP (Title XXI)b

6-19 up to 185%

No program

No program

6-17 from 101 to 133%

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

TABLE D.3 Median Income and Health Insurance Coverage of Family Heads, and Their Spouses and Children by Type of Family, 2000a

Family type

Families

Individuals

Children Under 18

Number (thousands)

Share (%)

Median Income

Number (thousands)

Share (%)

Number (thousands)

Share

Unmarried, childless persons living alone in home

17,937

17%

$28,000

17,937

7%

N/A

N/A

Unmarried, childless persons living with someone in home but not in same familyb

16,799

16%

$21,016

16,799

7%

N/A

N/A

Unmarried, childless persons living with someone in household in the same familyc

5,837

6%

$36,020

14,270

6%

N/A

N/A

Families with child as householder/ reference persond

953

1%

$ 0

1,085

0%

N/A

N/A

Married, childless couples

23,683

23%

$62,000

56,206

22%

N/A

N/A

Two parents, median income

One child

10,243

10%

$63,537

34,713

14%

10,534

15%

Two children

10,563

10%

$63,500

44,284

18%

21,369

30%

Three or more children

5,635

5%

$56,123

31,798

13%

19,413

27%

Single parent, median income

One child

6,747

7%

$20,658

14,961

6%

6,766

9%

Two children

3,591

3%

$20,112

11,296

4%

7,177

10%

Three or more children

1,779

2%

$15,730

8,308

3%

6,150

9%

Total

103,767

100%

$45,000

251,657

100%

71,409

100%

NOTE: N/A = not available.

a The analysis excludes those families living in a group household and those families comprised entirely of adults over age 64.

b Living situations of individuals in this category may be vastly different compared to one another. Potentially included in this category are individuals engaged in a rental contract, friends that live together, an unmarried couple, etc. In each instance, the individuals are considered as members of different families.

c It will be noted that despite being categorized as families of childless, unmarried adults, the total number of people in these families far exceeds the total number of families. These families are made up of a single adult without a child under 18 and also another adult related to the single adult either as

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

Both Adults Covered

(thousands)

One Adult Covered

(thousands)

No Adults Covered

(thousands)

N/A

 

15,252

 

2,688

 

N/A

11,964

4,835

N/A

4,646

1,191

N/A

608

351

20,008

2,198

1,475

All children covered

Some children covered

No children covered

All children covered

Some children covered

No children covered

All children covered

Some children covered

No children covered

$67,000

 

$32,858

 

$30,000

 

8,751

N/A

211

283

N/A

142

258

N/A

597

9,182

87

35

209

18

102

329

36

564

4,493

84

31

185

16

64

227

74

461

 

$22,415

 

$14,280

 

N/A

N/A

N/A

4,669

N/A

311

730

N/A

1,037

N/A

N/A

N/A

2,644

46

77

416

67

341

N/A

N/A

N/A

1,323

34

27

182

38

175

a child, grandchild, or other relative. For reasons that cannot be determined through available Census Bureau data, these secondary individuals are not declared as part of a separate subfamily.

d An analysis of Census Bureau data indicates that in a small but notable number of instances, an individual younger than 18 but unmarried and childless is identified as the household or reference person of a subfamily. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities analysis separates these individuals into an individual family type category.

SOURCE: Tabulations of the Census Bureau’s 2001 Current Population Survey public use file were prepared for the IOM Committee by Matthew Broaddus, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

TABLE D.4 Health Insurance Coverage of Families Based on the Health Insurance Coverage of Family Members and the Family’s Poverty Status, 2000a

Status

No Childrenb

Category

1

Category

2

Category

3

Category

4

Category

5

Under 50% of Poverty

1,065

2,081

191

830

408

Both adults covered

X

X

X

X

196

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

One adult covered

653

923

82

524

72

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No adult covered

412

1,158

109

306

140

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

50% to 99% of Poverty

1,645

1,450

315

39

494

Both adults covered

X

X

X

X

295

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

One adult covered

1,358

838

227

25

96

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No adult covered

287

612

88

14

103

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

100% to 149% of Poverty

1,503

1,812

559

17

830

Both adults covered

X

X

X

X

505

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

One adult covered

1,088

1,057

402

8

165

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No adult covered

415

755

157

9

160

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

Two-Parent Families with Children

Single-Parent Families with Children

One Child

Two Children

Three or More Children

One Child

Two Children

Three or More Children

132

141

194

998

651

493

59

83

96

X

X

X

55

80

96

X

X

X

X

1

0

X

X

X

4

2

0

X

X

X

21

10

17

567

424

370

18

8

15

544

413

359

X

0

0

X

2

10

3

2

2

23

9

1

52

48

81

431

227

123

16

18

14

161

119

57

X

0

15

X

18

12

36

30

52

270

90

54

316

381

515

962

580

568

154

200

255

X

X

X

149

192

240

X

X

X

X

6

11

X

X

X

5

2

4

X

X

X

46

41

56

618

384

439

40

32

37

561

361

412

X

1

3

X

9

12

6

8

16

57

14

15

116

140

204

344

196

129

39

56

70

147

119

58

X

2

19

X

11

11

77

82

115

197

66

60

459

663

657

984

664

316

255

420

384

X

X

X

243

405

375

X

X

X

X

9

7

X

X

X

12

6

2

X

X

X

65

60

72

630

474

236

48

44

47

588

443

225

X

2

6

X

12

3

17

14

19

42

19

8

139

183

201

354

190

80

50

77

79

173

104

42

X

6

19

X

18

4

89

100

103

181

68

34

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

Status

No Childrenb

Category

1

Category

2

Category

3

Category

4

Category

5

150% to 199% of Poverty

1,417

1,531

568

12

1,026

Both adults covered

X

X

X

X

706

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

One Adult Covered

1,043

967

413

5

154

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No Adult Covered

374

564

155

7

166

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

200% or Higher of Poverty

12,307

9,924

4,204

54

20,923

Both adults covered

X

X

X

X

18,308

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

One adult covered

11,108

8,178

3,522

38

1,709

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No adult covered

1,199

1,746

682

16

906

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

a Analysis excludes those families living in a group household and those families comprised entirely of adults over 64.

b Category 1: Unmarried childless persons living alone in home

Category 2: Unmarried childless persons living with someone in the home but not in the same family

Category 3: Unmarried childless persons living with someone in the home in the same family

Category 4: Families with child as householder or reference person

Category 5: Married, childless couples

SOURCE: Tabulations of the Census Bureau’s 2001 Current Population Survey public use file were prepared for the IOM Committee by Matthew Broaddus, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

Two-Parent Families with Children

Single-Parent Families with Children

One Child

Two Children

Three or More Children

One Child

Two Children

Three or More Children

563

888

776

914

428

162

381

701

631

X

X

X

359

678

609

X

X

X

X

17

10

X

X

X

22

6

12

X

X

X

78

40

58

680

322

134

52

17

49

636

310

133

X

10

3

X

6

1

26

13

6

44

6

0

104

147

87

234

106

28

37

59

21

100

46

17

X

1

6

X

16

0

67

87

60

134

44

11

8,774

8,490

3,493

2,889

1,269

240

8,113

7,901

3,243

X

X

X

7,945

7,828

3,173

X

X

X

X

54

56

X

X

X

168

19

14

X

X

X

215

178

62

2,486

1,164

205

125

108

36

2,341

1,117

194

X

4

4

X

17

8

90

66

22

145

30

3

446

411

188

403

105

35

117

120

43

148

28

9

X

26

15

X

4

11

329

265

130

255

73

15

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

TABLE D.5 Adults’ and Children’s Health Insurance Coverage in Families by Poverty Status, 2000

 

Two-Parent Families with Children

Single-Parent Families with Children

One Child

Two Children

Three or More Children

One Child

Two Children

Three or More Children

Under 50% of Poverty

Both adults covered

Some children uncovered

7%

4%

0%

 

All children covered

93%

96%

100%

One adult covered

Some children uncovered

14%

20%

12%

4%

3%

3%

All children covered

86%

80%

88%

96%

97%

97%

No adult covered

Some children uncovered

69%

63%

83%

63%

48%

54%

All children covered

31%

38%

17%

37%

52%

46%

50%–99% of Poverty

Both adults covered

Some children uncovered

3%

4%

6%

 

All children covered

97%

96%

94%

One adult covered

Some children uncovered

13%

22%

34%

9%

6%

6%

All children covered

87%

78%

66%

91%

94%

94%

No adult covered

Some children uncovered

66%

60%

66%

57%

39%

55%

All children covered

34%

40%

34%

43%

61%

45%

100%–149% of Poverty

Both adults covered

Some children uncovered

5%

4%

2%

 

All children covered

95%

96%

98%

One adult covered

Some children uncovered

26%

27%

35%

7%

7%

5%

All children covered

74%

73%

65%

93%

93%

95%

No adult covered

Some children uncovered

64%

58%

61%

51%

45%

48%

All children covered

36%

42%

39%

49%

55%

53%

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

 

Two-Parent Families with Children

Single-Parent Families with Children

One Child

Two Children

Three or More Children

One Child

Two Children

Three or More Children

150%–199% of Poverty

Both adults covered

Some children uncovered

6%

3%

3%

 

All children covered

94%

97%

97%

One adult covered

Some children uncovered

33%

58%

16%

6%

4%

1%

All children covered

67%

43%

84%

94%

96%

99%

No adult covered

Some children uncovered

64%

60%

76%

57%

57%

39%

All children covered

36%

40%

24%

43%

43%

61%

200% of Poverty or Higher

Both adults covered

Some children uncovered

2%

1%

2%

 

All children covered

98%

99%

98%

One adult covered

Some children uncovered

42%

39%

42%

6%

4%

5%

All children covered

58%

61%

58%

94%

96%

95%

No adult covered

Some children uncovered

74%

71%

77%

63%

73%

74%

All children covered

26%

29%

23%

37%

27%

26%

 

SOURCE: Tabulations of the Census Bureau’s 2001 Current Population Survey public use file were prepared for the IOM Committee by Matthew Broaddus, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

TABLE D.6 Health Insurance Coverage of Families Based on the Health Insurance Coverage of Family Members and Race/Ethnicity of Family Head, 2000a

Race or Ethnicity

No Childrenb

Category

1

Category

2

Category

3

Category

4

Category

5

Black, Non-Hispanic

2,869

2,241

1,312

208

1,654

Both adults covered

X

X

X

X

1,373

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

One adult covered

2,361

1,536

946

148

168

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No adult covered

508

705

366

60

113

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

White, Non-Hispanic

13,415

11,571

3,447

455

19,269

Both adults covered

X

X

X

X

16,710

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

One adult covered

11,681

8,922

3,002

322

1,653

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No adult covered

1,734

2,649

445

133

906

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Hispanic

995

2,133

829

251

1,658

Both adults covered

X

X

X

X

1,095

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

One adult covered

689

925

515

116

234

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No adult covered

306

1,208

314

135

329

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

Two-Parent Families with Children

Single-Parent Families with Children

One Child

Two Children

Three or More Children

One Child

Two Children

Three or More Children

903

837

484

1,792

1,032

659

799

726

400

X

X

X

759

704

375

X

X

X

X

17

18

X

X

X

40

5

7

X

X

X

39

36

30

1,326

815

542

15

14

28

1,231

794

515

X

0

0

X

10

15

24

22

2

95

11

12

65

75

54

466

217

117

17

23

11

166

112

55

X

3

8

X

9

14

48

49

35

300

96

48

7,439

7,789

3,775

3,725

1,868

651

6,815

7,174

3,370

X

X

X

6,685

7,109

3,319

X

X

X

X

46

40

X

X

X

130

19

11

X

X

X

234

177

107

2,885

1,498

523

170

127

78

2,734

1,453

509

X

6

4

X

13

10

64

44

25

151

32

4

390

438

298

840

370

128

125

179

101

395

216

67

X

14

14

X

43

6

265

245

183

445

111

55

1,201

1,360

1,125

1,006

570

393

759

914

646

X

X

X

727

883

613

X

X

X

X

21

21

X

X

X

32

10

12

X

X

X

129

104

112

619

367

270

84

58

69

575

320

253

X

12

12

X

16

6

45

34

31

44

31

11

313

342

367

387

203

123

99

103

101

141

82

50

X

15

52

X

16

14

214

224

214

246

105

59

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

Race or Ethnicity

No Childrenb

Category

1

Category

2

Category

3

Category

4

Category

5

Asian and Other

659

853

248

41

1,104

Both adults covered

X

X

X

X

833

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

One adult covered

518

581

182

15

143

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No adult covered

141

272

66

26

128

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

a Analysis excludes those families living in a group household and those families comprised entirely of adults over 64.

b Category 1: Unmarried childless persons living alone in home

Category 2: Unmarried childless persons living with someone in the home but not in the same family

Category 3: Unmarried childless persons living with someone in the home in the same family

Category 4: Families with child as householder or reference person

Category 5: Married, childless couples

SOURCE: Tabulations of the Census Bureau’s 2001 Current Population Survey public use file were prepared for the IOM Committee by Matthew Broaddus, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

Two-Parent Families with Children

Single-Parent Families with Children

One Child

Two Children

Three or More Children

One Child

Two Children

Three or More Children

699

575

249

226

123

78

588

489

191

X

X

X

579

485

186

X

X

X

X

3

5

X

X

X

9

1

0

X

X

X

24

12

15

151

86

50

15

10

10

130

76

46

X

0

0

0

7

4

9

2

5

21

3

0

87

74

43

75

37

28

17

25

14

29

6

11

X

4

0

0

1

4

70

45

29

46

30

13

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

TABLE D.7 Adult Health Insurance Coverage in Families with Children by Race, 2000

Race

Two-Parent Families with Children

Single-Parent Families with Children

Number

Percentage of Total

Number

Percentage of Total

Black, Non-Hispanic

Both adults covered

1,925

87%

 

One adult covered

105

5%

2,683

77%

No adults covered

194

9%

800

23%

Total

2,224

 

3,483

 

White, Non-Hispanic

Both adults covered

17,359

91%

 

One adult covered

518

3%

4,906

79%

No adults covered

1,126

6%

1,338

21%

Total

19,003

 

6,244

 

Hispanic

Both adults covered

2,319

63%

 

One adult covered

345

9%

1,256

64%

No adults covered

1,022

28%

713

36%

Total

3,686

 

1,969

 

Asian and Other

Both adults covered

1,268

83%

 

One adult covered

51

3%

287

67%

No adults covered

204

13%

140

33%

Total

1,523

 

427

 

 

SOURCE: Tabulations of the Census Bureau’s 2001 Current Population Survey public use file were prepared for the IOM Committee by Matthew Broaddus, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

TABLE D.8 Adults’ and Children’s Health Insurance Coverage in Families by Race, 2000.

Race

Two-Parent Families with Children

Single-Parent Families with Children

One Child

Two Children

Three or More Children

One Child

Two Children

Three or More Children

Black, Non-Hispanic

Both adults covered

Some children uncovered

5%

3%

6%

 

All children covered

95%

97%

94%

One adult covered

Some children uncovered

62%

61%

7%

7%

3%

5%

All children covered

38%

39%

93%

93%

97%

95%

No adults covered

Some children uncovered

74%

69%

80%

64%

48%

53%

All children covered

26%

31%

20%

36%

52%

47%

White, Non-Hispanic

Both adults covered

Some children uncovered

2%

1%

2%

 

All children covered

98%

99%

98%

One adult covered

Some children uncovered

27%

28%

27%

5%

3%

3%

All children covered

73%

72%

73%

95%

97%

97%

No adults covered

Some children uncovered

68%

59%

66%

53%

42%

48%

All children covered

32%

41%

34%

47%

58%

52%

Hispanic

Both adults covered

Some children uncovered

4%

3%

5%

 

All children covered

96%

97%

95%

One adult covered

Some children uncovered

35%

44%

38%

7%

13%

6%

All children covered

65%

56%

62%

93%

87%

94%

No adults covered

Some children uncovered

68%

70%

72%

64%

60%

59%

All children covered

32%

30%

28%

36%

40%

41%

Asian and Other

Both adults covered

Some children uncovered

2%

1%

3%

 

All children covered

98%

99%

97%

One adult covered

Some children uncovered

38%

17%

33%

14%

12%

8%

All children covered

63%

83%

67%

86%

88%

92%

No adults covered

Some children uncovered

80%

66%

67%

61%

84%

61%

All children covered

20%

34%

33%

39%

16%

39%

 

SOURCE: Tabulations of the Census Bureau’s 2001 Current Population Survey public use file were prepared for the IOM Committee by Matthew Broaddus, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

TABLE D.9 Citizenship and Health Insurance Coverage of Family Heads and Their Spouses and Children by Type of Family, 2000a

Family Type

No Childrenb

Category

1

Category

2

Category

3

Category

4

Category

5

Citizen Head of Family

16,990

14,838

5,357

855

22,377

Both adults covered

X

X

X

X

19,226

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

One adult covered

14,633

11,129

4,443

564

2,021

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No adult covered

2,357

3,709

914

291

1,130

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Non-citizen Head of Family

947

1,960

481

98

1,306

Both adults covered

X

X

X

X

785

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

One adult covered

616

835

203

36

176

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No Adult Covered

331

1,125

278

62

345

All children covered

X

X

X

X

X

Some children covered

X

X

X

X

X

No children covered

X

X

X

X

X

a The analysis excludes those families living in a group household and those families comprised entirely of adults over 64.

b Category 1: Unmarried childless persons living alone in home

Category 2: Unmarried childless persons living with someone in the home but not in the same family

Category 3: Unmarried childless persons living with someone in the home in the same family

Category 4: Families with child as householder or reference person

Category 5: Married, childless couples

SOURCE: Tabulations of the Census Bureau’s 2001 Current Population Survey public use file were prepared for the IOM Committee by Matthew Broaddus, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

Two-Parent Families with Children

Single-Parent Families with Children

One Child

Two Children

Three or More Children

One Child

Two Children

Three or More Children

9,291

9,587

4,971

6,286

3,323

1,576

8,362

8,675

4,303

X

X

X

8,171

8,570

4,201

X

X

X

X

71

78

X

X

X

191

34

24

X

X

X

338

267

189

4,754

2,628

1,253

220

173

137

4,473

2,528

1,201

X

10

9

X

39

30

118

84

43

281

61

22

591

645

479

1,532

695

323

179

244

145

651

369

152

X

26

30

X

57

28

412

375

304

881

269

143

950

976

664

462

267

204

599

629

305

X

X

X

579

612

292

X

X

X

X

16

6

X

X

X

20

1

7

X

X

X

87

63

76

227

138

133

63

36

48

197

115

122

X

8

7

X

7

5

24

19

21

30

16

6

264

284

283

235

129

71

79

85

82

79

47

30

X

10

44

X

10

9

185

189

157

156

72

32

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×

TABLE D.10 Health Insurance Coverage of Family Heads and Their Spouses by Citizenship Status and Family Type, 2000

Family Type

Two-Parent Families with Children

Single-Parent Families with Children

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Citizen Head of Family

Both parents covered

21,340

89%

 

One parent covered

794

3%

8,635

77%

No parents covered

1,715

7%

2,550

23%

Total

23,849

 

11,185

 

Non-citizen Head of Family

Both parents covered

1,533

59%

 

One parent covered

226

9%

498

53%

No parents covered

831

32%

435

47%

Total

2,590

 

933

 

 

SOURCE: Tabulations of the Census Bureau’s 2001 Current Population Survey public use file were prepared for the IOM Committee by Matthew Broaddus, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Data Tables." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health Insurance is a Family Matter. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10503.
×
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Health Insurance is a Family Matter is the third of a series of six reports on the problems of uninsurance in the United Sates and addresses the impact on the family of not having health insurance. The book demonstrates that having one or more uninsured members in a family can have adverse consequences for everyone in the household and that the financial, physical, and emotional well--being of all members of a family may be adversely affected if any family member lacks coverage. It concludes with the finding that uninsured children have worse access to and use fewer health care services than children with insurance, including important preventive services that can have beneficial long-term effects.

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