National Academies Press: OpenBook

The Future of the Public's Health in the 21st Century (2003)

Chapter: Appendix D: Healthy People 2010 Objectives for the Public Health Infrastructure

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Healthy People 2010 Objectives for the Public Health Infrastructure." Institute of Medicine. 2003. The Future of the Public's Health in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10548.
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D Healthy People 2010* Objectives for the Public Health Infrastructure

Goal: Ensure that federal, tribal, state, and local health agencies have the infrastructure to provide essential public health services effectively.

Data and Information Systems

  1. Increase the proportion of Tribal, State, and local public health agencies that provide Internet and e-mail access for at least 75 percent of their employees and that teach employees to use the Internet and other electronic information systems to apply data and information to public health practice.

  2. (Developmental) Increase the proportion of Federal, Tribal, State, and local health agencies that have made information available to the public in the past year on the Leading Health Indicators, Health Status Indicators, and Priority Data Needs.

  3. Increase the proportion of all major national, State, and local health data systems that use geocoding to promote nationwide use of geographic information systems (GIS) at all levels.

  4. Increase the proportion of population-based Healthy People 2010 objectives for which national data are available for all population groups identified for the objective.

  5. Increase the proportion of Leading Health Indicators, Health Status Indicators, and Priority Data Needs for which data—especially for select populations—are available at the Tribal, State, and local levels.

  6. Increase the proportion of Healthy People 2010 objectives that are tracked regularly at the national level.

*  

Department of Health and Human Services. 2000. Public health infrastructure. In Healthy People 2010. Available online at www.health.gov/healthypeople/document/tableofcontents.htm#volume2.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Healthy People 2010 Objectives for the Public Health Infrastructure." Institute of Medicine. 2003. The Future of the Public's Health in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10548.
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  1. Increase the proportion of Healthy People 2010 objectives for which national data are released within 1 year of the end of data collection.

Workforce

  1. Increase the proportion of Federal, Tribal, State, and local agencies that incorporate specific competencies in the essential public health services into personnel systems.

  2. Increase the proportion of schools for public health workers that integrate into their curricula specific content to develop competency in the essential public health services.

  3. Increase the proportion of Federal, Tribal, State, and local public health agencies that provide continuing education to develop competency in essential public health services for their employees.

Public Health Organizations

  1. Increase the proportion of State and local public health agencies that meet national performance standards for essential public health services.

  2. Increase the proportion of Tribes, States, and the District of Columbia that have a health improvement plan and increase the proportion of local jurisdictions that have a health improvement plan linked with their State plan.

  3. Increase the proportion of Tribal, State, and local health agencies that provide or assure comprehensive laboratory services to support essential public health services.

  4. Increase the proportion of Tribal, State, and local public health agencies that provide or assure comprehensive epidemiology services to support essential public health services.

  5. Increase the proportion of Federal, Tribal, State, and local jurisdictions that review and evaluate the extent to which their statutes, ordinances, and bylaws assure the delivery of essential public health services.

Resources

  1. Increase the proportion of Federal, Tribal, State, and local public health agencies that gather accurate data on public health expenditures, categorized by essential public health service.

Prevention Research

  1. Increase the proportion of Federal, Tribal, State, and local public health agencies that conduct or collaborate on population-based prevention research.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Healthy People 2010 Objectives for the Public Health Infrastructure." Institute of Medicine. 2003. The Future of the Public's Health in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10548.
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Page 421
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Healthy People 2010 Objectives for the Public Health Infrastructure." Institute of Medicine. 2003. The Future of the Public's Health in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10548.
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Page 422
Next: Appendix E: Competencies for Public Health Workers: A Collection of Competency Sets for Public Health-Related Occupations and Professions »
The Future of the Public's Health in the 21st Century Get This Book
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The anthrax incidents following the 9/11 terrorist attacks put the spotlight on the nation’s public health agencies, placing it under an unprecedented scrutiny that added new dimensions to the complex issues considered in this report.

The Future of the Public’s Health in the 21st Century reaffirms the vision of Healthy People 2010, and outlines a systems approach to assuring the nation’s health in practice, research, and policy. This approach focuses on joining the unique resources and perspectives of diverse sectors and entities and challenges these groups to work in a concerted, strategic way to promote and protect the public’s health.

Focusing on diverse partnerships as the framework for public health, the book discusses:

  • The need for a shift from an individual to a population-based approach in practice, research, policy, and community engagement.
  • The status of the governmental public health infrastructure and what needs to be improved, including its interface with the health care delivery system.
  • The roles nongovernment actors, such as academia, business, local communities and the media can play in creating a healthy nation.

    Providing an accessible analysis, this book will be important to public health policy-makers and practitioners, business and community leaders, health advocates, educators and journalists.

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