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Decline of the Steller Sea Lion in Alaskan Waters: Untangling Food Webs and Fishing Nets (2003)

Chapter: Appendix H: Guide to the Common and Scientific Names of Marine Mammal, Fish, Invertebrate, and Bird Species

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Guide to the Common and Scientific Names of Marine Mammal, Fish, Invertebrate, and Bird Species." National Research Council. 2003. Decline of the Steller Sea Lion in Alaskan Waters: Untangling Food Webs and Fishing Nets. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10576.
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APPENDIX H Guide to the Common and Scientific Names of Marine Mammal, Fish, Invertebrate, and Bird Species

Common Name

Scientific Name

MAMMALS:

 

Antarctic fur seal

Arctocephalus gazella

Blue whale

Balaenoptera musculus

Bowhead whale

Balaena mysticetus

California sea lion

Zalophus californianus

Fin whale

Balaenoptera physalus

Guadalupe fur seal

Arctocephalus townsendi

Hawaiian monk seal

Monachus schauinslandi

Humpback whale

Megaptera novaeangliae

Killer whale

Orcinus orca

Manatee

Trichecus manatus

Northern elephant seal

Mirounga angustirostris

Northern fur seal

Callorhinus ursinus

Northern right whale

Eubalaena glacialis

Pacific harbor seal

Phoco vitulina

Sea otter

Enhydra lutris

Sei whale

Balaenoptera borealis

Southern sea lion

Otaria flavescens

Sperm whale

Physeter macrocephalus

Steller (or Northern) sea lion

Eumetopias jubatus

Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Guide to the Common and Scientific Names of Marine Mammal, Fish, Invertebrate, and Bird Species." National Research Council. 2003. Decline of the Steller Sea Lion in Alaskan Waters: Untangling Food Webs and Fishing Nets. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10576.
×

FISH:

 

Arctic cod

Boreogadus saida

Arrowtooth flounder

Atheresthes stomias

Atka mackerel

Pleurogrammus monopterygius

Black rockfish

Sebastes melanops

Blue rockfish

Sebastes mystinus

Capelin

Mallotus villosus

Chinook salmon

Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

Chum salmon

Oncorhynchus keta

Coho salmon

Oncorhynchus kisutch

Greenland halibut

Reinhardtius hippoglossoides

Lingcod

Ophiodon elongates

Pacific cod

Gadus macrocephalus

Pacific halibut

Hippoglossus stenolepis

Pacific herring

Clupea pallasi

Pacific ocean perch

Sebastes alutus

Pacific sand lance

Ammodytes hexapterus

Pacific sandfish

Trichodon trichodon

Pacific sleeper shark

Somniosus pacificus

Pink salmon

Oncorhynchus gorbuscha

Rock sole

Pleuronectes bilineatus

Sablefish

Anoplopoma fimbria

Salmon shark

Lamna ditropis

Sockeye salmon

Oncorhynchus nerka

Walleye pollock

Theragra chalcogramma

Yellowfin sole

Pleuronectes aspera

INVERTEBRATE:

 

Northern shrimp

Pandalus borealis

Blue king crab

Paralithodes platypus

Dungeness crab

Cancer magister

Golden king crab

Lithodes aequispinus

Grooved Tanner crab

Chionoecetes tanneri

Korean hair crab

Erimacrus isenbeckii

Red king crab

Paralithodes camtschaticus

Scarlet king crab

Lithodes couesi

Snow crab

Chionoecetes opilio

Tanner crab

Chionoecetes bairdi

Triangle Tanner crab

Chionoecetes angulatus

BIRD:

 

Spectacled eider

Somateria fischeri

Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Guide to the Common and Scientific Names of Marine Mammal, Fish, Invertebrate, and Bird Species." National Research Council. 2003. Decline of the Steller Sea Lion in Alaskan Waters: Untangling Food Webs and Fishing Nets. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10576.
×
Page 203
Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Guide to the Common and Scientific Names of Marine Mammal, Fish, Invertebrate, and Bird Species." National Research Council. 2003. Decline of the Steller Sea Lion in Alaskan Waters: Untangling Food Webs and Fishing Nets. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10576.
×
Page 204
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For an unknown reason, the Steller sea lion population in Alaska has declined by 80% over the past three decades. In 2001, the National Research Council began a study to assess the many hypotheses proposed to explain the sea lion decline including insufficient food due to fishing or the late 1970s climate/regime shift, a disease epidemic, pollution, illegal shooting, subsistence harvest, and predation by killer whales or sharks. The report's analysis indicates that the population decline cannot be explained only by a decreased availability of food; hence other factors, such as predation and illegal shooting, deserve further study. The report recommends a management strategy that could help determine the impact of fisheries on sea lion survival -- establishing open and closed fishing areas around sea lion rookeries. This strategy would allow researchers to study sea lions in relatively controlled, contrasting environments. Experimental area closures will help fill some short-term data gaps, but long-term monitoring will be required to understand why sea lions are at a fraction of their former abundance.

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