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Measurement Problems in Criminal Justice Research: Workshop Summary (2003)

Chapter: Appendix A: Workshop Agenda

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2003. Measurement Problems in Criminal Justice Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10581.
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Appendix A
Workshop Agenda

Committee on Law and Justice

Committee on National Statistics

National Research Council

AGENDA

 

July 24, 2000

9:00-9:15 a.m.

Welcoming Remarks

Charles Wellford, Chair, Committee on Law and Justice

Colin Loftin, Workshop Chair

Andrew A. White, Director, Committee on National Statistics

Carol V. Petrie, Director, Committee on Law and Justice

Session One

 

9:15-9:45 a.m.

Sensitive Questions in Survey Research

Paper by Roger Tourangeau and Madeline E. McNeeley, Joint Program in Survey Methods, University of Maryland, College Park Presented by Madeline E. McNeeley

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2003. Measurement Problems in Criminal Justice Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10581.
×

9:45-10:15 a.m.

Comment

Judith Lessler

Research Triangle Institute

James Walker

University of Wisconsin, Madison

10:15-10:30 a.m.

Q&A/Discussion

10:30-10:45 a.m.

Break

Session Two

 

10:45-11:15 a.m.

Small Area Estimation

T.E. Raghunathan, Survey Methodology Program, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, Ann Arbor

11:15-11:45 a.m.

Comment

Elizabeth Stasny, Ohio State University, Columbus

Charles Manski, Northwestern University

11:45 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Q&A/Discussion

12:00-2:00 p.m.

Working Lunch

Charles Wellford, University of Maryland, College Park

Session Three

 

2:00-2:30 p.m.

Comparison of Self-Report and Official Data

Terence P. Thornberry, School of Criminal Justice, and Marvin D. Krohn, Department of Sociology, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2003. Measurement Problems in Criminal Justice Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10581.
×

2:30-3:00 p.m.

Comment

David Farrington, Institute of Criminology, Cambridge University, Cambridge

Laura Dugan

Georgia State University

Alfred Blumstein

Carnegie Mellon University

3:00-3:15 p.m.

Q&A/Discussion

3:15-3:30 p.m.

Break

Session Four

 

3:30-4:00 p.m.

Measuring Rare Events in Small Populations

Richard McCleary, School of Social Ecology, University of California, Irvine

4:00-4:30 p.m.

Comment

James Lynch, School of Public Affairs, American University, Washington, DC

4:30-4:45 p.m.

Q&A/Discussion

4:45-5:30 p.m.

General Discussion

5:30 p.m.

Reception and Dinner

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2003. Measurement Problems in Criminal Justice Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10581.
×
Page 95
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2003. Measurement Problems in Criminal Justice Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10581.
×
Page 96
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2003. Measurement Problems in Criminal Justice Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10581.
×
Page 97
Next: Appendix B: List of Workshop Participants »
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Most major crime in this country emanates from two major data sources. The FBI’s Uniform Crime Reports has collected information on crimes known to the police and arrests from local and state jurisdictions throughout the country. The National Crime Victimization Survey, a general population survey designed to cover the extent, nature, and consequences of criminal victimization, has been conducted annually since the early1970s. This workshop was designed to consider similarities and differences in the methodological problems encountered by the survey and criminal justice research communities and what might be the best focus for the research community. In addition to comparing and contrasting the methodological issues associated with self-report surveys and official records, the workshop explored methods for obtaining accurate self-reports on sensitive questions about crime events, estimating crime and victimization in rural counties and townships and developing unbiased prevalence and incidence rates for rate events among population subgroups.

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