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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2003. Evaluation of Manufacturing Vision and Strategies for the Production of Military Combat Vehicles: The Crusader Artillery System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10608.
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Appendix

Biographies of Committee Members

Thom J.Hodgson (NAE) (Chair) is James T.Ryan Distinguished University Professor of Industrial Engineering at North Carolina State University (NCSU), where he has taught since 1983, and director of the Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering Institute. He has also been head of the Department of Industrial Engineering at NCSU; director of the Division of Design and Manufacturing Systems, National Science Foundation; professor of industrial and systems engineering at the University of Florida; and operations research analyst for the Ford Motor Company. Dr. Hodgson’s research interests include scheduling, production and inventory control, manufacturing systems, and applied and military operations research. He is a fellow of the Institute of Industrial Engineers and a member of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences. He is the author or coauthor of four book chapters and over 60 journal articles and has served as editor in chief of IIE Transactions, and as international associate editor of the Belgian Journal of Operations Research, Statistical and Computational Science. He served for 6 years as a member of the Army Science Board.

Ernest R. Blood recently retired from his position as assistant director of process and materials, Fabricated Structures Division, Caterpillar Inc. His career spanned 30 years at Caterpillar in test engineering, design engineering, and manufacturing process engineering. His implementation of advanced manufacturing methods improved the competitiveness of Caterpillar’s product lines. His current interests include the effective linking of manufacturing and engineering expertise to meet, or exceed, customer demands for equipment affordability, capability, and reliability.

Clive L. Dym is Fletcher Jones Professor of Engineering Design in the Department of Engineering and Director, Center for Design Education, Harvey Mudd College. Prior to his current position he was professor and head of the Department of Civil Engineering, University of Massachusetts. He received his Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics (1967) from Stanford University. He has written 10 books (8 published and 2 in press). He has expertise in engineering design, knowledge-based systems in engineering, fundamentals of modeling, and analyzing engineering systems. He is a member of the editorial boards of Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing (founding editor, 1986–1996; editor emeritus, 1997-present), Journal of Sound and Vibration (1980–1987), Noise Control Engineering (1982–1984), Journal of the Acoustical Society of America (1976–1979), and The Shock and Vibration Digest (1971–1977). He has received numerous awards and is a member of various professional societies. He is listed in Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who in Engineering, and American Men and Women of Science.

Jay Lee is Wisconsin Distinguished professor and Rockwell Automation professor and director of Intelligent Maintenance Systems at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. He was director for product development and manufacturing at the United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, Conn., and was responsible for the strategic direction and R&D activities in the areas

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2003. Evaluation of Manufacturing Vision and Strategies for the Production of Military Combat Vehicles: The Crusader Artillery System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10608.
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of materials processing and modeling, advanced manufacturing processes and systems, green technologies, quality and reliability systems, and advanced product/process maintenance and design technologies and support for United Technologies Corp’s (UTC’s) business units. Dr. Lee received his Doctor of Science in mechanical engineering from the George Washington University. Currently, he is leading an enterprise effort to develop and implement the green factory and lean manufacturing engineering activities for UTC. Previously, he served as program director for the Engineering Research Center’s Program, the Industry/University Cooperative Research Centers Program, and the Manufacturing Processes and Manufacturing Program at the National Science Foundation. Prior to his work at the NSF, he held several positions in the automotive industry, the machine tool industry, and the service industry, working in the broad field of manufacturing engineering. Dr. Lee has been involved in research, engineering, and program management activities in the areas of precision machinery, factory automation, and service productivity, as well as manufacturing strategies. His current research work involves the areas of production automation, smart services and maintenance, and lean manufacturing modeling and design. Currently, he is chair of the Manufacturing Engineering Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and is a member of the board of directors for the National Center for Manufacturing Science. He served as a committee member for the Manufacturing Process Controls Study Board and the New York Science and Technology Center Review Board for the National Research Council.

Celestine A.Ntuen is a professor and director at the Institute for Human-Machine Studies at the North Carolina A&T State University. He received his Ph.D. in Math/Physics from West Virginia University. His expertise includes human-machine system engineering, human-computer interface (HCI), system analysis and simulation, and human factors. Dr. Ntuen has published over 110 refereed journal and conference proceeding papers, edited one book, and developed workshop series on human-centered design and cognitive engineering. In the last six years, he has served as principal investigator to numerous research investigations that include modeling and cognitive display of military courses of action by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, human modeling in complex systems by NASA, human signal analysis for workload classification by the U.S. Air Force, and human-machine research and education by the Office of Naval Research. His current interests are industry application of information technology, ergonomics and human factors in service and manufacturing industries, and system analysis and simulation for management decision making.

Steven R.Ray is chief, Manufacturing Systems Integration Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He is responsible for the fiscal, personnel, programmatic and strategic management of a division of roughly 80 staff, including visiting researchers. He directs research programs, determines priorities, identifies customers, and integrates the division’s activities to maximize its contribution to the solution of national problems related to measurements and standards supporting systems interoperation within the manufacturing sector. He has led a group that addressed integration issues related to manufacturing process planning, exchange and communication standards, integration architectures, and collaborative engineering technologies. He established a new program (TIMA—Technologies for the Integration of Manufacturing Applications) while on detail assignment to the NIST Advanced Technology Program. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical and aerospace engineering in 1981 from Princeton University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2003. Evaluation of Manufacturing Vision and Strategies for the Production of Military Combat Vehicles: The Crusader Artillery System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10608.
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Page 29
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2003. Evaluation of Manufacturing Vision and Strategies for the Production of Military Combat Vehicles: The Crusader Artillery System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10608.
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Page 30
Evaluation of Manufacturing Vision and Strategies for the Production of Military Combat Vehicles: The Crusader Artillery System Get This Book
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The Army project manager for the Crusader artillery system set a goal of using state-of-the art manufacturing for the system’s production. To assist in meeting these goals, the Army asked the National Research Council to provide expert advice on the strategy, technology, and business plans for system development. While the Crusader project was cancelled, Congress has directed the Army to consider alternative systems. This report presents an analysis of and recommendations on several issues concerning the manufacturing process that was to be used by the contractor for the Crusader project. Some of these issues should be of relevance to potential replacement artillery systems should the Army proceed with any.

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