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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Acronyms and Abbreviations, 119 ." National Research Council. 2003. End Points for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in Russia and the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10667.
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Appendix B
Acronyms and Abbreviations


AMB

graphite-moderated, water-cooled reactors (early versions of the RBMK reactor)

ANL

Argonne National Laboratory

ATW

accelerator transmutation of waste


BN-600

liquid metal fast reactor

BWR

boiling-water reactor

Bq

becquerels, 1Bq=1 disintegration per second


Ci

curies, 1 Ci=3.7×1010 disintegrations per second =3.7×1010 becquerels


DOE

U.S. Department of Energy

DWPF

Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site


EURT

Eastern Urals Radioactive Trail


FTB

floating technical base


GWe

gigawatts electric


HEU

highly-enriched uranium

HLW

high-level radioactive waste

HTGR

high-temperature gas reactor


ICPP

Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

INEEL

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

IPPE

Institute of Physics and Power Engineering


LLW

low-level radioactive waste

LMFBR

Liquid-metal fast breeder reactor

LMR

liquid-metal reactor

LRW

liquid radioactive waste


MCC

Mining and Chemical Combine, Minatom Ministry of Atomic Energy of the Russian Federation

MOX

mixed oxide (uranium-plutonium)

MPC&A

materials protection, control, and accounting

MSRE

Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Acronyms and Abbreviations, 119 ." National Research Council. 2003. End Points for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in Russia and the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10667.
×

MTHM

metric tons of heavy metal

MWd/kgHM

megawatt-days per kilogram of heavy metal

MWe

megawatts electric

MWth

megawatts thermal


NIIAR

Scientific Research Institute of Nuclear Reactors (Dmitrovgrad)

NIKIET

Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (Moscow)

NPS

nuclear-powered ship


ORNL

Oak Ridge National Laboratory


PA “Mayak”

Production Association “Mayak”

PFS

Private Fuel Storage

PIMCA

The Priargunsky Industrial Mining-Chemical Association

PIS

the pilot-industrial site at Dmitrovgrad

PMDA

U.S.-Russia Plutonium Management and Disposi tion Agreement

PUREX

plutonium uranium extraction (chemical separation process)

PWR

pressurized-water reactor


R&D

research and development

RBMK

graphite-moderated, water-cooled reactor

REDOX

reduction-oxidation (chemical reactions)

RT-1

reprocessing facility at PA “Mayak” in Russia

RT-2

planned reprocessing facility at Zheleznogorsk in Russia


SCC

Siberian Chemical Combine (Tomsk-7 or Seversk)

SFA

spent fuel assembly

SNF

spent nuclear fuel

SPZ

sanitary-protection zone

SRS

Savannah River Site

SRW

solid radioactive waste

STB

shore technical base


TBP

tributyl phosphate

THOREX

thorium extraction (chemical separation process)

TMI

Three Mile Island (nuclear power plant in the United States)

TRUEX

Transuranic Extraction Process

TUK-104

spent fuel transport cask


VVER

Russian pressurized water reactor


WIPP

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Acronyms and Abbreviations, 119 ." National Research Council. 2003. End Points for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in Russia and the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10667.
×
Page 119
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Acronyms and Abbreviations, 119 ." National Research Council. 2003. End Points for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in Russia and the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10667.
×
Page 120
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End Points for spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in Russian and the United States provides an analysis of the management of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in Russia and the United States, describing inventories, comparing approaches, and assessing the end-point options for storage and disposal of materials and wastes. The authoring committee finds that despite differences in philosophy about nuclear fuel cycles, Russia and the United States need similar kinds of facilities and face similar challenges, although in Russia many of the problems are worse and funding is less available. This book contains recommendations for immediate and near-term actions, for example, protecting and stabilizing materials that are security and safety hazards, actions for the longer term, such as developing more interim storage capacity and studying effects of deep injection, and areas for collaboration.

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