National Academies Press: OpenBook

Air Quality Management in the United States (2004)

Chapter: Abbreviations

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Suggested Citation:"Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2004. Air Quality Management in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10728.
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Abbreviations


ADOM

acid deposition modeling

AIRMoN

Atmospheric Integrated Research Monitoring Network

AIRS

Aerometric Information Retrieval System (EPA)

AQCR

air quality control region

AQM

air quality management

ARS

Agricultural Research Service (USDA)

ASPEN

Assessment System for Population Exposure Nationwide

ATS

Allowance Tracking System


BACT

best available control technology

BART

best available retrofit technology

BAT

best available technology

Btu

British thermal unit


CAA

Clean Air Act (1963)

CASAC

Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (of EPA)

CASTNet

Clean Air Status and Trends Network

CCRP

California Comparative Risk Project

CDC

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

CEM

continuous emissions monitoring

CFCs

chlorofluorocarbons—compounds made up of chlorine, fluorine, and carbon

CFR

Code of Federal Regulations

CO

carbon monoxide

CO2

carbon dioxide

CPSC

Consumer Products Safety Commission

Suggested Citation:"Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2004. Air Quality Management in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10728.
×

CTG

control technique guidelines

CTM

chemical transport model


3D

three-dimensional—three in space

4D

four-dimensional—three in space and one in time

DALYs

disability-adjusted life-years

DDT

dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane

DOE

U.S. Department of Energy


ECO

employee commute options

EIIP

Emission Inventory Improvement Program

EKMA

empirical kinetic modeling approach

EPA

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

ERC

emission-reduction credit


FACE

free air CO2 enrichment

FEM

federal equivalent methods

FHWA

U.S. Federal Highway Administration

FIA/FHM

Forest Inventory and Analysis and Forest Health Monitoring Program

FIP

federal implementation plan

FRM

federal reference methods

FTIR

Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

FTP

federal test procedure (for vehicle emissions)


G/bhp-hr

grams per brake horsepower hour

g/gal

grams per gallon

g/kWh

grams per kilowatt hour

GACT

generally available control technology

GAO

U.S. General Accounting Office

GC

gas chromatography

GPMN

Gaseous Pollutant Monitoring Network (NPS)

GPMP

Gaseous Pollutant Monitoring Program (NPS)

GPRA

Government Performance and Results Act (1993)

GVWR

gross vehicle weight rating (weight of vehicle plus rated cargo capacity)


H2S

hydrogen sulfide

HAP

hazardous air pollutant

HC

hydrocarbons

HCl

hydrogen chloride

HDV

heavy-duty vehicle

HEI

Health Effects Institute

HOV

high-occupancy vehicle

hp

horsepower

hr

hour

HUD

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development


I/M

vehicle inspection and maintenance

Suggested Citation:"Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2004. Air Quality Management in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10728.
×

IM240

vehicle emissions test using a dynamometer, which lasts for 240 seconds

IMPROVE

Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments

IRIS

Integrated Risk Information System

ISTEA

Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (1991)

IWG

International Working Group on Environmental Justice


kW

kilowatts


LAER

lowest achievable emissions rate

lb

pounds

LDT

light-duty truck

LDV

light-duty vehicle

LEV

low-emissions vehicle

LPG

liquified petroleum gas

LTER

long-term ecological research

LTM

long-term monitoring


MACT

maximum achievable control technology

MATES

multiple air toxics exposure study

MDN

Mercury Deposition Network

mg/m3

milligrams per cubic meter

μg/m3

micrograms per cubic meter

MOBILE

EPA’s computer program to estimate mobile-source emissions

MPO

Metropolitan Planning Organization

MSA

metropolitan statistical area

MTBE

methyl tert-butyl ether


NAA

nonattainment area

NAAQS

National Ambient Air Quality Standards

NADP

National Atmospheric Deposition Program

NAMS

national air monitoring stations

NAPAP

National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program

NATA

National Air Toxics Assessment

NCLAN

National Crop Loss Assessment Network

NCore

National Core Monitoring Network

NCS

National Children’s Study

NEJAC

National Environmental Justice Advisory Council

NEP

National Estuaries Program

NEPA

National Environmental Policy Act

NERRS

National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NOAA)

NESHAPs

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants

NFS

National Forest System

NHANES

National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

NHEXAS

National Human Exposure Assessment Survey

Suggested Citation:"Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2004. Air Quality Management in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10728.
×

NLEV

national low-emission vehicle

NMHC

nonmethane hydrocarbons

NO

nitrogen oxide

NO2

nitrogen dioxide

NOx

oxides of nitrogen (NO and NO2)

NOAA

U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

NONROAD

EPA’s computer program to estimate emissions from mobile sources not used on roads (for example, aircraft, trains, farm equipment)

NPS

U.S. National Park Service

NRC

National Research Council

NSPS

New Source Performance Standards

NSR

new-source review

NTN

National Trends Network


O2

diatomic oxygen

O3

ozone

OBD

on-board diagnostics (indicates when vehicles’ emission controls are not operating properly)

ODP

ozone-depleting potential

OH

hydroxyl radical

OSHA

U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration

OSTP

Office of Science and Technology Policy (White House)

OTAG

Ozone Transport Assessment Group

OTC

Ozone Transport Commission

OTR

Ozone Transport Region (the states from Maine to Virginia and Washington, DC)


PACE

Pollution Abatement Cost and Expenditures Survey

PAMS

photochemical assessment monitoring stations

Pb

lead

PBDEs

polybrominated diphenyl ethers

PCBs

polychlorinated biphenyls

PEM

parametric emissions monitoring

PHS

U.S. Public Health Service

PM

particulate matter

PM2.5

particulate matter with aerodynamic equivalent diameters of 2.5 micrometers (μm) or less

PM10

particulate matter with aerodynamic equivalent diameters of 10 μm or less

ppbv

parts per billion by volume

ppm

parts per million

PSD

prevention of significant deterioration

psi

pounds per square inch


QA/QC

quality assurance/quality control

Suggested Citation:"Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2004. Air Quality Management in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10728.
×

RACT

reasonably available control technology

RADM

regional acid deposition model

RECLAIM

Regional Clean Air Management Program

REHEX

regional human exposure model

RFG

reformulated gasoline

RHC

reactive hydrocarbons

ROG

reactive organic gas

RVP

Reid vapor pressure (the vapor pressure of a petroleum product at 100°F)


SCAQMD

South Coast Air Quality Management District

SCR

selective catalytic reduction

SFTP

supplemental federal test procedure (for vehicle emissions)

SHED

sealed housing evaporative determination

SIP

state implementation plan

SLAMS

state and local air monitoring stations

SO2

sulfur dioxide

SOM

soil organic matter

STAPPA-ALAPCO

State and Territorial Air Pollution Program Administrators and Association of Local Air Pollution Control Officials

SUV

sport utility vehicle


TCM

transportation control measure

TCP

transportation control plan

TEA-21

Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century

TIME

temporally integrated monitoring of ecosystems

TIP

tribal implementation plan

TRI

toxic release inventory


UAM

urban airshed model

ULEV

ultra-low-emissions vehicle

USC

U.S. Code

USDA

U.S. Department of Agriculture

USGS

U.S. Geological Survey


VMT

vehicle miles traveled

VOC

volatile organic compound

vol

volume


WEPCO

Wisconsin Electric Power Company

WRAP

Western Regional Air Partnership

wt

weight


ZEV

zero-emission vehicle

Suggested Citation:"Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2004. Air Quality Management in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10728.
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Suggested Citation:"Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2004. Air Quality Management in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10728.
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Suggested Citation:"Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2004. Air Quality Management in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10728.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2004. Air Quality Management in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10728.
×
Page 351
Suggested Citation:"Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2004. Air Quality Management in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10728.
×
Page 352
Suggested Citation:"Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2004. Air Quality Management in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10728.
×
Page 353
Suggested Citation:"Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2004. Air Quality Management in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10728.
×
Page 354
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The implementation of air quality regulations should be less bureaucratic -- with more emphasis on results than process -- and should be designed to protect ecosystems as well as people. The report recommends that The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) use an approach to target groups of pollutants instead of individual ones and that revised or new regulations also should consider how air pollution travels from state to state and across international borders. In addition, improved tracking of emissions is needed to accurately assess what populations are at the highest risk of health problems from pollution and to better measure the progress of pollution-control strategies.

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