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Dioxins and Dioxin-like Compounds in the Food Supply: Strategies to Decrease Exposure (2003)

Chapter: Appendix C: Open Session and Workshop Agendas

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Open Session and Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2003. Dioxins and Dioxin-like Compounds in the Food Supply: Strategies to Decrease Exposure. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10763.
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Page 309
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Open Session and Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2003. Dioxins and Dioxin-like Compounds in the Food Supply: Strategies to Decrease Exposure. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10763.
×
Page 310
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Open Session and Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2003. Dioxins and Dioxin-like Compounds in the Food Supply: Strategies to Decrease Exposure. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10763.
×
Page 311
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Open Session and Workshop Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2003. Dioxins and Dioxin-like Compounds in the Food Supply: Strategies to Decrease Exposure. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10763.
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Page 312

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c Open Session and Workshop Agendas OPEN SESSION Implications of Dioxin in the Food Supply December 19, 2001 National Academy of Sciences Washington, DC 1:00 p.m. Environmental Protection Agency William Farland Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Christopher DeRosa European Union Antoine Liem 2:15 2:30 5:00 Break Interagency Working Group on Dioxin Clifford Gabriel U.S. Department of Health and Human Services William Raub U.S. Department of Agriculture James Schaub Adjourn 309

310 DIOXINS AND DIOXIN-LIKE COMPOUNDS IN THE FOOD SUPPLY WORKSHOP #1 Implications of Dioxin in the Food Supply February 19, 2002 National Academy of Sciences Washington, DC 8:30 a.m. Welcome on Behalf of the Food and Nutrition Board Ann Yaktine, Food and Nutrition Board Introductory Comments on Behalf of the Committee on the Implications of Dioxin in the Food Supply Robert Lawrence, Committee Chair 8:45 Dioxins in Human Foods and Animal Feeds: Effects of Cooking Methods on Dioxins in Foods Janice Huwe, U.S. Department of Agriculture 9:25 Intake Data from Consumption of Animal Products and Future Directions of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Clifford Johnson, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 10:05 Break 10:25 Assays for Dioxin in Human Tissues: Update on Dioxin Assays in NHANES Participants Don Patterson, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 11:20 Health Effects of Dioxins Linda Birnbaum, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 12:00 p.m. Lunch 1:00 Introductory Comments Moderator: Robert Lawrence, Committee Chair Populations at Risk from Potential Exposure to Dioxins in Food, Tribal Council of Arizona and Tribal Women, Infants and Children Program Tamera Dawes, Inter Tribal Council of Arizona Ken Jock, St. Regis Mohawk Tribe 2:00 Break

APPENDIX C 3:15 Break Issues with Dioxins in Foods and the Environment Michael F. Jacobson, Centerfor Science in the Public Interest Stephen Lester, Center for Health and Environmental Justice Gina Solomon, Natural Resources Defense Council Karen Perry, Physicians for Social Responsibility 3:30 Perspectives from Industry Hilary Shallo, Egg Nutrition Center Sean Hays, Chlorine Chemistry Council 5:15 Open Forum 5:45 Adjourn WORKSHOP #2 Implications of Dioxin in the Food Supply April 2, 2002 National Academy of Sciences Washington, DC 9:00 a.m. Welcome on Behalf of the Food and Nutrition Board Ann Yaktine, Food and Nutrition Board Introductory Comments Robert Lawrence, Committee Chair Methodological Analysis of Dioxins in Food and Feed 9:10 10:00 Economic Impact Studies of Food Safety Regulations John Eyraud, Eastern Research Group Break Food Monitoring for Dioxins Richard Canady, Food and Drug Administration 11:30 Group Discussion of Total Diet Study Richard Canady, Food and Drug Administration Elke Jensen, Food and Drug Administration P. Michael Bolger, Food and Drug Administration Karen Hulebak, U.S. Department of Agriculture 12:00 p.m. Lunch 311

312 DIOXINS AND DIOXIN-LIKE COMPOUNDS IN THE FOOD SUPPLY Accumulation and Elimination of Dioxins in Humans 1:00 2:00 2:50 Dioxin Intake from Food: Current State of Knowledge and Uncertainties in Assumptions Dwain Winters, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Kinetics of Dioxin Elimination in the Ranch Hand Cohort Joel Michalek, Brooks Air Force Base Break 3:00 Open Forum 4:00 Adjourn

Next: Appendix D: Committee Member Biographical Sketches »
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Dioxin and dioxin-like compounds, or DLCs, are found throughout the environment, in soil, water, and air. People are exposed to these unintentional environmental contaminants primarily through the food supply, although at low levels, particularly by eating animal fat in meat, dairy products, and fish. While the amount of DLCs in the environment has declined since the late 1970s, the public continues to be concerned about the safety of the food supply and the potential adverse health effects of DLC exposure, especially in groups such as developing fetuses and infants, who are more sensitive to the toxic effects of these compounds.

Dioxins and Dioxin-like Compounds in the Food Supply: Strategies to Decrease Exposure, recommends policy options to reduce exposure to these contaminants while considering how implementing these options could both reduce health risks and affect nutrition, particularly in sensitive and highly exposed groups, if dietary changes are suggested.

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