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Advancing Prion Science: Guidance for the National Prion Research Program (2004)

Chapter: Appendix A: Agendas of Open Sessions of Committee Meetings

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas of Open Sessions of Committee Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2004. Advancing Prion Science: Guidance for the National Prion Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10862.
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Page 231
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas of Open Sessions of Committee Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2004. Advancing Prion Science: Guidance for the National Prion Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10862.
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Page 232
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas of Open Sessions of Committee Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2004. Advancing Prion Science: Guidance for the National Prion Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10862.
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Page 233
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas of Open Sessions of Committee Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2004. Advancing Prion Science: Guidance for the National Prion Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10862.
×
Page 234
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas of Open Sessions of Committee Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2004. Advancing Prion Science: Guidance for the National Prion Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10862.
×
Page 235
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas of Open Sessions of Committee Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2004. Advancing Prion Science: Guidance for the National Prion Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10862.
×
Page 236
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas of Open Sessions of Committee Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2004. Advancing Prion Science: Guidance for the National Prion Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10862.
×
Page 237
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas of Open Sessions of Committee Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2004. Advancing Prion Science: Guidance for the National Prion Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10862.
×
Page 238
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas of Open Sessions of Committee Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2004. Advancing Prion Science: Guidance for the National Prion Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10862.
×
Page 239
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas of Open Sessions of Committee Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2004. Advancing Prion Science: Guidance for the National Prion Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10862.
×
Page 240
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas of Open Sessions of Committee Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2004. Advancing Prion Science: Guidance for the National Prion Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10862.
×
Page 241
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas of Open Sessions of Committee Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2004. Advancing Prion Science: Guidance for the National Prion Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10862.
×
Page 242

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Appendixes

Appendixes

:_ Aasndas of Open Sessions of F; ~ Committee Meetings The committee gathered information about the state of prion science from journal articles and sections of reports provided by committee staff, as well as from presentations and group dialogues during three meetings held in the summer and fall of 2002. The agendas of the open sessions of those meetings appear below. Meeting 1 luly 17-18, 2002 500 5th Street, NW, Room 101, Washington, DC Purpose of the Meeting · Discuss and reconcile any bias issues with committee members · Orient members and consultants to the National Prion Research Project · Orient members and consultants to any U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) concerns regarding the threat of transmissible spongiform encepha- lopathies (TSEs) to their food and blood supplies · Clarify the study tasks and determine a strategy for accomplishing them · Determine if the committee is lacking any area of needed expertise · Determine the format and identify presenters who should be invited to address the committee at subsequent meetings · Determine study milestones and subsequent meeting dates 233

234 ADVANCING PRION SCIENCE OPEN SESSION, JULY 17, 2002 9:15 a.m. Introductory remarks, introductions of committee and expert consultants, and review of charge Richard T. Johnson, M.D., chair of the committee Sponsor presentation DOD Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs and DOD National Prion Research Program COL Ken Bertram, Director, Congressional Directed Medical Research Programs, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command 10:00 10:30 1 0:45 11:15 1 1:45 12:15 p.m. Lunch 1:00 1:30 2:00 DOD stakeholder meeting summary COL Ken Bertram Break Protecting the DOD's food supply from TSEs COL Scott Severin, Deputy Director, DOD Veterinary Service Activity, Office of the Army Surgeon General Protecting the DOD's blood supply from TSEs CDR Rebecca Sparks, Deputy Director, Armed Services Blood Program Evidence for or against transmission of TSEs in blood Roger Y. Dodd, Ph.D., committee member Surveillance of TSEs in animals and risks to human health in the United States Elizabeth S. Williams, D.V.M., Ph.D., consultant to the committee Surveillance of TSEs in humans in the United States PierInigi Gambetti, M.D., consultant to the committee New detection methods for TSEs in living sheep Katherine O'Rourke, D.V.M., Ph.D., Animal Disease Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Pullman, Washington

APPENDIX A 2:30 235 Break New techniques for detecting prions in animal tonsillar tissue Mike Miller, D.V.M., Ph.D., Colorado Division of Wildlife, Wildlife Research Center, Fort Collins, Colorado Adjourn open session OPEN SESSION, JULY 18, 2002 8:30 a.m. Currently available assays and reagents for detecting prions David Asher, M.D., Chief, Laboratory of Bacterial, Parasitic, and Unconventional Agents, Division of Emerging and Transfusion-Transmitted Diseases, Office of Blood Research and Review, Center for Biologics Evocation and Research, Food and Drug Administration Commercial diagnostic testing for TSEs in Europe Prionics Alex Raeber, Ph.D., Chief of Research, Prionics AG, Schlieren, Switzerland 10:00 Adjourn open session Meeting 2 September 12-13, 2002 500 5th Street, NW, Room 203, Washington, DC Meeting Objectives · Review information about prion structure and methods to better define its structure report . will: Review concepts of prion conversion, pathogenesis, and detection Review current and newer techniques useful for TSE diagnostics Discuss the compositions of the interim report and the final study Develop draft recommendations regarding the essential research that > lead to better TSE diagnostics > address animal models, bioassays, reagents, and the research in- frastructure needed for TSE research > achieve critical breakthroughs to jump-start progress in prion-dis- ease science

236 ADVANCING PRION SCIENCE OPEN SESSION, SEPTEMBER 12, 2002 8:30 a.m. Introductory remarks Richard T. Johnson, M.D., chair of the committee · Introduction of members who were not at previous meeting · Summary of the first meeting · Goal of this meeting: produce draft recommendations for the interim report 9:00 Group discussion · Does the outline of the final report reflect the proper direc- tion of the study? · Review emerging topics. What should be added? 10:00 11:00 12:00 p.m. Lunch Critical prion research requirements and research infrastructure Stanley B. Prusiner, M.D., consultant to the committee PrP conversion, mechanisms, pathogenesis, and future research needs Byron Caughey, Ph.D., Laboratory of Persistent Viral Diseases, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH, Hamilton, Montana 12:30 Mini-symposium: prion structure and structure-based detection · Too! 1: Electron crystallography Holger Wille, Ph.D., Institute for Neuro~legenerative Diseases, University of California, San Francisco 2:00 · Too! 2: Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) David E. Wemmer, Ph.D., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley Proteomic tools to detect prions and surrogate markers Ron Hendrickson, Ph.D., formerly of MDS Proteomics, Toronto

APPENDIX A 237 3:00 Break 3:15 3:55 5:00 Next-generation detection methods David A. Harris, M.D., Ph.D., consultant to the committee Discussion of interim report: · Which diagnostic tools show the greatest potential for ad- vancing prion detection, particularly antemortem detection? · What research is needed to develop these tools? Adjourn session OPEN SESSION, SEPTEMBER 13, 2002 8:30 a.m. Extraneural pathogenesis of prion disease and research gaps Adriano Ag~zzi, M.D., Ph.D., consultant to the committee 9:30 PrPSc diagnostics; building research capacity; international collaboration Jean-Philippe Deslys, M.D., Ph.D., Head of the Prion Group, Medical Research Department, Commissariat ~ I'Energie Atomique, Fontenay-~ux-Roses, France 10:30 Adjourn Open Session Meeting 3 October 29-30, 2002 Arnold & Mabel Beckman Center of The National Academies Irvine, California Meeting Objectives · Review and discuss the critical study time lines and tasks · Review and refine draft interim report and recommendations · Receive briefings on Creutzfel~t-}akob disease (C}D) and chronic wasting disease (CWD) surveillance systems · Receive briefings on novel proteomic tools · Discuss agendas of Meetings 4 and 5

238 OPEN SESSION, OCTOBER 29, 2002 1:00 p.m. Mini-Symposium on TSE Surveillance ADVANCING PRION SCIENCE Linking bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) to variant C}D in the United Kingdom: lessons learned and applications to CWD in the United States Robert G. Will, M.D., committee member 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 National surveillance of CWD in captive cervids Lynn Creehmore, Staff Veterinarian/Wildlife Disease Liaison, National Animal Health Programs, Animal and Pant Health Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Fort Collins, Colorado Break CWD surveillance of cervids from a state's perspective Sam D. Hol~nd, D.V.M., South Dakota Animal Industry Board, Pierre, South Dakota Novel techniques at the cutting edge of protein detection Roger Brent, Ph.D., Associate Director of Research, The Molecular Sciences Institute Inc., Berkeley, California Adjourn open session Meeting 4 lanuary 21-22, 2003 500 5th Street, NW, Room 201, Washington, DC Meeting Objectives · Determine the content of the final report · Develop research recommendations for TSE surveillance and future research needs · Plan the program for the final meeting

APPENDIX A OPEN SESSION, {ANUARY 21, 2003 Mini-Symposium: C}D Surveillance 9:45 a.m. C}D surveillance in Canada Neil Cashman, M.D., Center for Research in Neurodegen- erative Diseases, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada 10:30 Break 1 0:45 C}D surveillance in the United States Ermias Belay, M.D., Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia Mini-Symposium: Prion Inactivation and Therapeutics for TSE 11:30 Prion inactivation David M. Taylor, Ph.D., M.B.E., Committee Member 12:15 p.m. Lunch 12:45 239 Antibody-based therapeutics for TSE R. Anthony Williamson, Ph.D., Department of Immunology, The Scripps Research Institute, La bold, California 1:30 Gene therapy as a treatment for TSE Howard Federoff, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Neurology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, New York 2:15 Break 2:30 Noninflammatory spongiform neurodegeneration caused by a conventional virus John L. Portis, M.D., Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institutes of Health (NIAID), Hamilton, Montana OPEN SESSION, JANUARY 22, 2003 8:30 a.m. Intracellular trafficking of PrP and cytoso! folding Jiyan Ma, Ph.D., Department of Molecular and Cellar Biology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio

240 9:15 10:00 ADVANCING PRION SCIENCE Use of neuroimaging to diagnose TSE William E. KInnk, M.D., Ph.D., Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Adjourn open session. Meeting 5 March 25-26, 2003 500 5th Street, NW, Room 101, Washington, DC Meeting Objectives · Develop research recommendations for TSE surveillance, epidemiol- ogy, and therapeutics, and for prion inactivation · Establish a process for the committee to review drafts of the final report during the next several months OPEN SESSION, MARCH 25, 2003 8:30 a.m. Opening comments, review of objectives, and general . c .lscusslon. Richard T. Johnson, M.D., Committee Chair Mini-Symposium: Controlling BSE 9:00 10:30 Control points in the beef processing industry Mr. Dave Harlan, Taylor Packing and Excel Food Solutions Company, Wyalusing, Pennsylvania The role of the federal government in managing and controlling the risk of BSE in the United States Linda Detwiler, D.V.M.; Veterinary Service, Animal and Pant Health Inspection Service, USDA, Robbinsville, New Jersey Break

APPENDIX A 1 0:45 1 1:30 12:15 p.m. Lunch 241 Prion research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Caird E. Rexroad, Jr., Ph.D.; Administrator's Council, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Washington, D.C. Oral prion neuroinvasion: the role of the tongue Richard Bessen, Ph.D.; Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska 1:00 · Transmission of the BSE agent to nonhuman primates · Identification of a laminin receptor that is a cell-surface receptor for prpC Corinne I. Lasme'zas, D.V.M., Ph.D.; Laboratory for Prion Pathogenesis, Atomic Energy Commission, Service de Neurovirologie, Fontenay-~ux-Roses, France 2:00 Adjourn open session OPEN SESSION, MARCH 26, 2003 8:30 a.m. The processing of deer and elk meat in the United States and intersects with commercial beef processing Warrie I. Means, Ph.D.; Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming Dynamics of CWD in mule deer populations: studies of prevalence and transmission at multiple scales N. Thompson Hobbs, Ph.D.; Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 10:00 10:30 Break The quest for an FDA-approved test to screen human blood and blood products for priors: regulatory, scientific, and commercial obstacles Jay Epstein, M.D.; Director Office of Blood Research and Review, FDA, Rockville, Maryland and David M. Asher, M.D., consultant to the committee

242 11:30 Lunch in room 101 12:30 p.m. Adjourn open session ADVANCING PRION SCIENCE

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In Advancing Prion Science, the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Assessment of Relevant Science recommends priorities for research and investment to the Department of Defense’s National Prion Research Program (NPRP). Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), also called prion diseases, are invariably fatal neurodegenerative infectious diseases that include bovine spongiform encephalopathy (commonly called mad cow disease), chronic wasting disease, scrapie, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. To develop antemortem diagnostics or therapies for TSEs, the committee concludes that NPRP should invest in basic research specifically to elucidate the structural features of prions, the molecular mechanisms of prion replication, the mechanisms of TSE pathogenesis, and the physiological function of prions’ normal cellular isoform. Advancing Prion Science provides the first comprehensive reference on present knowledge about all aspects of TSEs—from basic science to the U.S. research infrastructure, from diagnostics to surveillance, and from prevention to treatment.

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