National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Acronyms and Abbreviations
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Research Council. 2004. Direct and Indirect Human Contributions to Terrestrial Carbon Fluxes: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11037.
×

Appendix A
Agenda

A National Academies Workshop

DIRECT AND INDIRECT HUMAN CONTRIBUTIONS TO TERRESTRIAL GREENHOUSE GAS FLUXES

The National Academies

Keck Center, Room 100

500 Fifth St., NW

Washington, DC 20001

September, 23–24, 2003

8:00 am to 5:30 pm

September 24th, 2003

Keck Center, Room 100

8:00 a.m.

Breakfast—Room 100

8:30

Introductory Remarks: Goals and Statement of Work, Definitions, Product of Workshop

Michael Prather, Chair

8:45

Sponsor Perspective

William Hohenstein, USDA Global Change Program Office

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Research Council. 2004. Direct and Indirect Human Contributions to Terrestrial Carbon Fluxes: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11037.
×

9:10

Terrestrial Ecosystems, Carbon Stocks, and the UNFCCC

Bob Watson, World Bank

9:40

Discussion

Ian Roy Noble, World Bank

10:30

Break

11:00

National and International Greenhouse Gas Inventory System: Technical Requirements, Project Accounting, and Uncertainty

Dina Kruger, EPA

11:30

Discussion

John Kimble, USDA/Natural Resources Conservation Service

12:00 p.m.

Lunch—Room 100

1:30

Consideration of Spatial Scales and Timescales in Assessing Carbon Stocks and Fluxes

George Hurtt, University of New Hampshire

1:50

Separating Direct Human-Induced Changes from Other Effects

Jen Jenkins, University of Vermont (presented by Richard Birdsey)

2:10

Discussion

Ann Camp, Yale University

2:30

Break

3:00

Estimates of Carbon Stocks and Fluxes from Land Use Change

Christine Goodale, Woods Hole Research Center

3:30

Estimates of Carbon Stocks and Fluxes from Forestry Activities

Evan DeLucia, University of Illinois Urbana-Champagne

3:50

Estimates of Carbon Stocks and Fluxes from Agricultural Activities

Cesar Izaurralde, Battelle,

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

4:20

Discussion

Perry Hagenstein

4:50

Summary of Key Issues, General Discussion

Richard Houghton, Woods Hole Research Center

5:30

Wrap-up and Adjourn for the Day

Michael Prather, Chair

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Research Council. 2004. Direct and Indirect Human Contributions to Terrestrial Carbon Fluxes: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11037.
×

September 24, 2003

Keck Center, Room 201

8:00 a.m.

Breakfast—Room 208

8:30

Carbon Cycle—Overview of CO2 and CH4 cycles

William Schlesinger, Duke University

9:00

Indirect Human-Induced Effects (CO2 fertilization, nitrogen, climate change)

Dennis Ojima, Colorado State University

9:30

Natural Effects (fire, pests, and climate variability)

Nate Stephenson, USGS West Ecological Research Center, Sequoia and Kings Canyon

10:00

Discussion

Ruth Defries, University of Maryland

10:20

Break

10:40

Efficacy and Longevity of Varying Carbon Storage Practices

Tristram West, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

11:10

Implications for Indirect and Natural Effects on National and International Greenhouse Gas

Inventories

Chris Field, Carnegie Institution

11:40

What Research is Needed to Enable Partitioning of Direct and Indirect Effects?

Jim Randerson, University of California,

Irvine

12:10 p.m.

Discussion

Jason Hamilton, Ithaca College

12:30

Lunch—Room 208

1:30

Land Succession Effects (historical forest practices, agriculture to forests)

Chris Potter, NASA Ames

2:00

U.S. Forests: Inventories, Ecosystem Models, and Other Approaches

Linda Heath, USDA

2:30

Tropical Forests: Inventories, Ecosystem Models, and Other Approaches

Sandra Brown, Winrock International

3:00

Discussion

Ian Roy Noble, World Bank

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Research Council. 2004. Direct and Indirect Human Contributions to Terrestrial Carbon Fluxes: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11037.
×

3:20

Break

3:40

What Data Resolution for Direct and Indirect Effects? When Can This Be done?

Richard Birdsey, USDA Forest Service

4:10

Issues of Scientific Methodology—Lessons from the UNFCCC Brazil Proposal

Michael Prather, University of California, Irvine

4:20

Current State of the Science Regarding Partitioning of Net Carbon Fluxes

Eric Sundquist

5:20

Anticipated Future Capability (Climate Change Science Program/Water Resources Applications Project) to Quantify Specific Processes

Bryan Hannegan, Council on Environmental Quality

6:20

Wrap-up and Our Report

6:30

Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Research Council. 2004. Direct and Indirect Human Contributions to Terrestrial Carbon Fluxes: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11037.
×
Page 65
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Research Council. 2004. Direct and Indirect Human Contributions to Terrestrial Carbon Fluxes: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11037.
×
Page 66
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Research Council. 2004. Direct and Indirect Human Contributions to Terrestrial Carbon Fluxes: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11037.
×
Page 67
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Research Council. 2004. Direct and Indirect Human Contributions to Terrestrial Carbon Fluxes: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11037.
×
Page 68
Next: Appendix B: Steering Committee and Speaker Biographies »
Direct and Indirect Human Contributions to Terrestrial Carbon Fluxes: A Workshop Summary Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $29.00 Buy Ebook | $23.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Human-induced climate change is an important environmental issue worldwide, as scientific studies increasingly demonstrate that human activities are changing the Earth’s climate. Even if dramatic reductions in emissions were made today, some human-induced changes are likely to persist beyond the 21st century. The Kyoto Protocol calls for emissions reporting that separates out management-induced changes in greenhouse gases from those changes caused by indirect human effects (e.g., carbon dioxide fertilization, nitrogen deposition, or precipitation changes), natural effects, and past practices on forested agricultural lands.

This book summarizes a September 2003 workshop where leaders from academia, government and industry came together to discuss the current state of scientific understanding on quantifying direct human-induced change in terrestrial carbon stocks and related changes in greenhouse gas emissions and distinguishing these changes from those caused by indirect and natural effects.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!