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Scaling Up Treatment for the Global AIDS Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities (2005)

Chapter: Appendix A: Information Gathering Workshop Agenda

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Information Gathering Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Scaling Up Treatment for the Global AIDS Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11043.
×

Appendix A
Information Gathering Workshop Agenda

Committee on Examining the Probable Consequences of Alternative Patterns of Widespread Antiretroviral Drug Use in Resource-Constrained Settings

Tuesday, January 27, 2004

Room 100, Keck Building

500 5th Street, NW

Washington, DC 2001

8:00-8:20

Welcome, Introduction of Committee, and Statement of Charge

Dr. James Curran and Dr. Haile Debas

Committee Cochairs

The Opportunity

8:20-8:45

The Challenge of HIV/AIDS in 2004 and the WHO 3 × 5 Program

Dr. Jim Kim

Advisor to the Director-General

World Health Organization

Geneva, Switzerland

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Information Gathering Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Scaling Up Treatment for the Global AIDS Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11043.
×

8:45-9:10

The Global Funds’ Lessons Learned Regarding ARV

Drug Scale-up in Resource-Constrained Settings

Dr. Bernhard Schwartlander

Director

Strategic Information and Measurement

Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria

Geneva, Switzerland

9:10-9:35

The U.S. Emergency Plan for Antiretroviral Scale-up:

The Latest Programmatic Developments

Dr. Joe O’Neil

Deputy Coordinator

Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator

Department of State

Washington, DC

9:35-9:55

General Discussion

9:55-10:15

BREAK

Antecedents

10:15-10:40

Durability of ARV Therapy: U.S. Experience and Its Implications for Resource-Constrained Settings

Dr. Robert Redfield

Cofounder and Director of Clinical Care and Research Division, Institute of Human Virology

University of Maryland

Baltimore, MD

10:40-11:05

A U.S. Clinical Perspective on the Implications of ARV

Resistance for Resource-Constrained Settings

Dr. Steven Deeks

Associate Clinical Professor of Clinical Medicine

University of California, San Francisco

San Francisco, CA

11:05-11:30

Lessons Learned from the Scale-up of ARV Treatment in Brazil

Dr. Mauro Schechter

Professor of Infectious Diseases

Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Information Gathering Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Scaling Up Treatment for the Global AIDS Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11043.
×

11:30-11:55

Lessons Learned from the Use of ARVs in Very

Low-Resource Settings: The Haiti Experience

Dr. Daniel Fitzgerald

Groupe Haitien d’Étude du Sarcome de Kaposi et des infections Opportunistes (GHESKIO) Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and

Division of International Medicine and Infectious Diseases

Cornell University Medical College

New York, NY

11:55-12:20

MSF Perspectives on ARV Administration:

Experiences from 20 countries and 10,000 Patients

Ms. Rachel Cohen

U.S. Director, Campaign for Access to Essential Medicines

Médecins sans Frontières

New York, NY

12:20-12:50

General Discussion

12:50-1:50

LUNCH

Clinical Principles for ARV Scale-up Programs

1:50-2:15

The 2003 WHO Guidelines for ARV Use:

Perspectives from a User

Dr. John Idoko

Professor

Jos University Teaching Hospital

Jos, Nigeria

2:15-2:40

MTCT-Plus Initiative: Perspectives from a

Multicountry Comprehensive HIV Care and Treatment Program

Dr. Wafaa El-Sadr

Professor

Mailman School of Public Health

Columbia University and Harlem Hospital

New York, NY

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Information Gathering Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Scaling Up Treatment for the Global AIDS Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11043.
×

2:40-3:05

The Role of the Laboratory in Managing ARV Care in a Country with Highly Limited Resources

 

Dr. Brooks Jackson

 

Baxley Professor and Director of Pathology

 

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

 

Baltimore, MD

3:05-3:30

The Social and Behavioral Dimensions of Adherence:

Implications for Patient Education

 

Dr. Carla Makhlouf Obermeyer

 

Scientist

 

Department of HIV/AIDS

 

World Health Organization

 

Geneva, Switzerland

3:30-3:50

General Discussion

3:50-4:10

BREAK

4:10-4:35

Preventing Mother-to-Child Transmission:

Issues of Therapy and Resistance

 

Dr. Lynne Mofenson

 

Pediatric, Adolescent and Maternal AIDS Branch

 

Center for Research for Mothers and Children

 

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

 

National Institutes of Health

 

Bethesda, MD

4:35-5:00

Pediatric Considerations for ARV Programs in

Resource-Constrained Settings

 

Dr. Mark Kline

 

Chief, Retrovirology Clinic

 

Professor of Pediatrics

 

Director, Baylor International Pediatric AIDS Initiative

 

Baylor College of Medicine/Texas Children’s Hospital

 

Houston, TX

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Information Gathering Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Scaling Up Treatment for the Global AIDS Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11043.
×

5:00-5:25

The Integration of Counseling, Prevention, and ARV Programs

 

Dr. Sam Dooley

 

Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

Atlanta, GA

5:25-6:00

Wrap-up Comments and Discussion

Wednesday, January 28, 2004

Management Principles for Scale-up of ARV Programs

8:00-8:05

Opening Comments

 

Dr. James Curran and Dr. Haile Debas

 

Committee Cochairs

8:05-8:30

Principles of Design and Scale-up for National

Clinical Care Programs and Applications to the WHO 3 × 5 Targets

 

Dr. M. Rashad Massoud

 

Vice President and Director

 

Quality and Performance Institute

 

University Research Co., LLC

 

Bethesda, MD

8:30-8:55

An Overview of Health Care Manpower, Health Care

Infrastructure, and Economics in Select Resource-Poor Countries

 

Mr. Mead Over

 

Lead Economist

 

Development Research Group

 

World Bank

 

Washington, DC

8:55-9:20

The Role of Community Mobilization in the Scale-up of ARV programs

 

Ms. Emi MacLean

 

Médecins sans Frontières

 

New York, NY

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Information Gathering Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Scaling Up Treatment for the Global AIDS Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11043.
×

9:20-9:45

Distribution of ARVs: Issues of Security, Logistics, and Quality

 

Ms. Yasmin Chandani

 

HIV/AIDS Advisor for DELIVER

 

John Snow, Inc.

 

Arlington, VA

9:45-10:10

Large Scale Training for ARV Providers:

Observations from the United States

 

Dr. John McNeil

 

Chief, Infectious Diseases

 

Howard University

 

PI, National Minority AIDS Education and Training Center

 

Washington, DC

10:10-10:30

General Discussion

10:30-10:50

BREAK

10:50-11:15

Perspectives on Purchasing First and Second Line ARVs

 

Ms. Lynn Margherio

 

Executive Vice President

 

The Clinton Foundation HIV/AIDS Initiative

11:15-11:40

Delivering ARVs: The Economic Consequences of Resistance

 

Dr. Stefano Bertozzi

 

Director

 

Economics and Policy

 

Center of Research on Health Systems

 

National Institute of Public Health

 

Cuernavaca, Mexico

11:40-12:00

General Discussion

12:00-1:00

LUNCH

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Information Gathering Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Scaling Up Treatment for the Global AIDS Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11043.
×

The Path Forward

1:00-1:25

Assessing Readiness for ARV Program Implementation

 

Dr. Eric Goosby

 

Chief Executive Officer

 

Pangea Global AIDS Foundation

 

San Francisco, CA

1:25-1:50

Specific Questions for Operations Research in the

Scale-up of ARV Treatment Programs in Low-Resource Settings

 

Dr. Tom Quinn

 

Professor of Medicine

 

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

 

Baltimore, MD

1:50-2:15

The Role of Statistical Prediction Methods for Managing ARV Scale-up Programs

 

Dr. Victor De Gruttola

 

Professor of Biostatistics

 

Harvard School of Public Health

 

Boston, MA

2:15-2:40

Ethical Issues in the Scale-up of ARV Programs in Resource-Poor Settings

 

Ms. Angela Wasunna

 

Lawyer/Bioethicist

 

Associate for International Programs

 

The Hastings Center

 

Garrison, NY

2:40-3:05

Discussion

3:05-3:30

BREAK

3:30-3:55

Information Management Considerations in Managing ARV Programs

 

Mr. Ronaldo Lima

 

International AIDS Vaccine Initiative

 

New York, New York

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Information Gathering Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Scaling Up Treatment for the Global AIDS Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11043.
×

3:55-4:20

ARV Resistance: Epidemiologic Implications and Public Health Surveillance

 

Dr. Diane Bennett

 

World Health Organization

 

Geneva, Switzerland

4:20-4:45

Monitoring and Evaluation for ARV Programs in Resource-Poor Settings

 

Dr. Paul DeLay

 

UNAIDS

 

Geneva, Switzerland

4:45-5:10

The South African Plan for ARV Scale-up

 

Dr. Tony Mbewu,

 

Executive Director

 

Medical Research Council of South Africa

 

Capetown, South Africa

5:10-6:00

Discussion and Wrap-up

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Information Gathering Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Scaling Up Treatment for the Global AIDS Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11043.
×
Page 199
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Information Gathering Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Scaling Up Treatment for the Global AIDS Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11043.
×
Page 200
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Information Gathering Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Scaling Up Treatment for the Global AIDS Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11043.
×
Page 201
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Information Gathering Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Scaling Up Treatment for the Global AIDS Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11043.
×
Page 202
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Information Gathering Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Scaling Up Treatment for the Global AIDS Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11043.
×
Page 203
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Information Gathering Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Scaling Up Treatment for the Global AIDS Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11043.
×
Page 204
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Information Gathering Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Scaling Up Treatment for the Global AIDS Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11043.
×
Page 205
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Information Gathering Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Scaling Up Treatment for the Global AIDS Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11043.
×
Page 206
Next: Appendix B: Primer on Humanimmunodeficiency Virus, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and Antiretroviral Therapy »
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An estimated forty million people carry the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and five million more become newly infected annually. In recent years, many HIV-infected patients in wealthy nations have enjoyed significantly longer, good-quality lives as a result of antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, most infected individuals live in the poorest regions of the world, where ART is virtually nonexistent. The consequent death toll in these regions--especially sub-Saharan Africa--is begetting economic and social collapse.

To inform the multiple efforts underway to deploy antiretroviral drugs in resource-poor settings, the Institute of Medicine committee was asked to conduct an independent review and assessment of rapid scale-up ART programs. It was also asked to identify the components of effective implementation programs.

At the heart of the committee's report lie five imperatives:

  • Immediately introduce and scale up ART programs in resource-poor settings.
  • Devise strategies to ensure high levels of patient adherence to complicated treatment regimens.
  • Rapidly address human-resource shortages to avoid the failure of program implementation.
  • Continuously monitor and evaluate the programs to form the most effective guidelines and treatment regimens for each population.
  • Prepare to sustain ART for decades.
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