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Review of NASA's Solid-Earth Science Strategy (2004)

Chapter: Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2004. Review of NASA's Solid-Earth Science Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11084.
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Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Edward M. Stolper (chair) is William E. Leonhard Professor of Geology at the California Institute of Technology. His research focuses on experimental, analytical, theoretical, and computational studies aimed at understanding the origin and evolution of igneous rocks on the earth and other planets. Dr. Stolper has participated in a number of committees aimed at examining broad science issues, including the Committee on Grand Challenges in the Environmental Sciences, the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, and the Space Studies Board. He is a recipient of the Meteoritical Society’s Nininger Meteorite Award, the American Geophysical Unions’ James B. Macelwane Award, the European Union of Geosciences’ Arthur Holmes Medal, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Newcomb Cleve Prize. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences.


Anny Cazenave is a senior scientist at the Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales and deputy director of the Laboratory for Space Studies in Geophysics and Oceanography at Toulouse University in France. Her major areas of interest include satellite geodesy applied to the earth’s gravity field and mantle dynamics, seafloor topography, the earth’s rotation and polar motion, crustal motions, and the temporal change of the gravity field. Dr. Cazenave is a member of several French committees evaluating research, including the National Committee for Scientific Research Assessment, the French Academy of Sciences’ Study Group in Geosciences, and the French Parliament’s Scientific Council for Evaluating Science and Technology. She is a former president of the geodesy section of the European Geophysical Society and a recipient of that society’s Vening-Meinesz Medal. She is also a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and its union international secretary. She is a member of the Academia Europaea and a corresponding member of the French Academy of Sciences.


Catherine G. Constable is a professor of geophysics at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Her research focuses on geomagnetism and paleomagnetism, variation in the geomagnetic field, the crustal magnetic field, and the electrical conductivity of the mantle. Dr. Constable chairs the steering committee for the Magnetics Information Consortium, which guides the development of databases for the magnetics community, and is a member of the advisory committee to the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics’ Committee on the Study of Earth’s Deep Interior. She is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and a recipient of the Royal Astronomical Society’s Price Medal for geomagnetism and aeronomy.


Francis A. Dahlen, Jr., is department chair and a professor of geosciences at Princeton University. His research interests are in theoretical global seismology, seismic tomography, mechanics of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2004. Review of NASA's Solid-Earth Science Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11084.
×

earthquake sources, rotation of the earth, and the mechanics and thermodynamics of brittle frictional mountain building. Dr. Dahlen is a former member of the Committee on Seismology. He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and a recipient of its Inge Lehmann Medal for fundamental theoretical advances laying the foundations of modern global seismology. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.


William E. Dietrich is a professor of geomorphology at the University of California, Berkeley. He has appointments in the Earth and Planetary Science Department (where he is currently chair), the Department of Geography, and the Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He uses fieldwork, radar altimetry, laboratory experiments, and numerical modeling to quantify and explore geomorphic processes and landscape evolution. Dr. Dietrich’s current research includes mechanistic analysis of landscape processes and evolution, identifying linkages between ecological and geomorphic processes, and building tools to address practical environmental problems. He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.


Bradford H. Hager is Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Earth Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests include the physics of geologic processes, mantle convection, crustal deformation, plate tectonics, and space-geodetic observations of surface deformation. Dr. Hager has chaired or been a member of several committees concerned with solid-earth science. These include the U.S. Geodynamics Committee, the Geodesy Committee, and the Committee to Review NASA’s Earth Science Enterprise Research Strategy for 2000–2010. He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and he received that society’s Macelwane Award in 1986. He also received the Woollard Award from the Geological Society of America.


Grant Heiken recently retired as a volcanologist in the Earth and Environmental Science Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Prior to joining LANL in 1975, he worked in NASA’s Lunar Receiving Laboratory during the Apollo and Skylab programs. Dr. Heiken’s research focuses on explosive volcanism, volcanic hazard analysis, geothermal exploration, and urban geoscience, and he has authored or coauthored books on all of these subjects. He was a Fullbright Scholar in 1999 and he studied the interaction between geology and history in Rome. He is a past president of the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior and a former member of the NRC Committee on Future Roles, Challenges, and Opportunities for the U.S. Geological Survey.


R. Keith Raney is a principal professional staff scientist at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL). Prior to joining the APL staff, he spent 18 years at the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, where he was chief radar scientist and co-founder of RADARSAT, Canada’s first remote sensing satellite program. He has contributed to the design of a variety of radar instruments and processing systems for NASA, the Canadian Space Agency, and the European Space Agency. Dr. Raney has served on numerous advisory committees related to remote sensing systems, and is currently a member of the science advisory group for ESA’s CryoSat radar altimeter Earth Explorer mission. He is a life fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and a recipient of the IEEE’s Millennium Medal, the Canadian Remote Sensing Society’s Gold Medal, and the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society’s Outstanding Achievement Award.


Frank M. Richter is Sewell Avery Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago. His research spans both geophysics and geochemistry, and includes investigations of mantle convection, thermal evolution of the earth, isotopic dating, pore-water chemistry in sediments, and melt segregation and chemical diffusion in molten rock systems. Both lines of research have led to professional society awards, including the American Geophysical Union’s Bowen Award and the Geological Society of America’s Wollard Award. Dr. Richter has served on numerous

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2004. Review of NASA's Solid-Earth Science Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11084.
×

solid-earth science committees, including the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, U.S. Geodynamics Committee, Committee on Seismology, and Committee on Basic Research Opportunities in the Earth Sciences. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences.


Mousumi Roy is an assistant professor of geophysics at the University of New Mexico. A modeler, her research focuses on tectonic deformation at different spatial and temporal scales, topographic evolution of tectonically active regions, and rheologic stratification in the lithosphere. Dr. Roy has convened or participated in a number of workshops related to large geophysical observation programs, including EarthScope and Continental Margins Research (MARGINS). She currently chairs the Geophysics Division of the Geological Society of America.


Lianxing Wen is an assistant professor of geophysics at the State University of New York, Stony Brook. His research focuses on the seismic structure of the earth’s mantle and core, mantle rheology and dynamics, and seismic wave propagation. In 2003 he was awarded the American Geophysical Union’s Macelwane Medal for significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by a young scientist and also became a fellow of the society. Dr. Wen is interested in both theoretical and observational methods and is currently a member of the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology’s Standing Committee for the Global Seismic Network.

NRC Staff

Anne M. Linn is a senior program officer with the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Academies. She has been with the board since 1993, directing the USA World Data Center Coordination Office and staffing a wide variety of geophysical and data policy studies. In addition, she is the secretary of the International Council for Science’s (ICSU’s) Panel on World Data Centers, and a member of the ICSU Ad Hoc Committee on Data. Prior to joining the staff of the National Academies, Dr. Linn was a visiting scientist at the Carnegie Institution of Washington and a postdoctoral geochemist at the University of California, Berkeley. She received a Ph.D. in geology from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2004. Review of NASA's Solid-Earth Science Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11084.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2004. Review of NASA's Solid-Earth Science Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11084.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2004. Review of NASA's Solid-Earth Science Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11084.
×
Page 40
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2004. Review of NASA's Solid-Earth Science Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11084.
×
Page 41
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2004. Review of NASA's Solid-Earth Science Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11084.
×
Page 42
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The report reviews NASA's solid-earth science strategy, placing particular emphasis on observational strategies for measuring surface deformation, high-resolution topography, surface properties, and the variability of the earth’s magnetic and gravity fields. The report found that NASA is uniquely positioned to implement these observational strategies and that a number of agency programs would benefit from the resulting data. In particular, the report strongly endorses the near-term launch of a satellite dedicated to L-band InSAR measurements of the land surface, which is a key component of the U.S. Geological Survey’s hazards mitigation program and the multi-agency EarthScope program.

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