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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2005. Mathematical and Scientific Development in Early Childhood: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11178.
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References

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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2005. Mathematical and Scientific Development in Early Childhood: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11178.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2005. Mathematical and Scientific Development in Early Childhood: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11178.
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Page 35
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2005. Mathematical and Scientific Development in Early Childhood: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11178.
×
Page 36
Next: Appendix A: Workshop Agenda »
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Expectations for early learning are very different than they were even as recently as a decade ago. With increased recognition of the intellectual capacities of young children, as well as a growing understanding of how these capacities develop and can be fostered, has come a growing recognition that early childhood education, in both formal and informal settings, may not be helping all children maximize their cognitive capacities. Mathematical and Scientific Development in Early Childhood explores the research in cognition and developmental psychology that sheds light on children's capacity to learn mathematical and scientific ideas. This summary report of the discussions and presentations at the workshop is designed to frame the issues relevant to advancing research useful to the development of research-based curricula for mathematics and science for young children.

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