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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Member Biographies." National Research Council. 2005. National Laboratories and Universities: Building New Ways to Work Together: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11190.
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Appendixes

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Member Biographies." National Research Council. 2005. National Laboratories and Universities: Building New Ways to Work Together: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11190.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Member Biographies." National Research Council. 2005. National Laboratories and Universities: Building New Ways to Work Together: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11190.
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Appendix A
Committee Member Biographies

Jerome Grossman (Chair) is a senior fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. Dr. Grossman currently chairs the Research Commercialization Working Group of the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable at the National Academies, which has recently focused its efforts on university-national laboratory relationships. Outside of his work at the Academies, Dr. Grossman is director of the Health Care Delivery Project at Harvard, bringing his expertise in the health care system and information technology and his experience in community services to develop innovations and reforms in the medical care delivery system. He is chairman emeritus of New England Medical Center, Inc., where he served as chairman and CEO from 1979 to 1995, and is an honorary physician at the Massachusetts General Hospital. In 1990, he was named a director of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and was appointed chairman from 1994 to 1997. Grossman has been a member of the founding team of several health care companies and has held teaching, research, and medical positions at Tufts University School of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School.


Charlette Geffen is currently a product line manager in the Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle Memorial Institute. Her primary responsibilities include business development and program management for the atmospheric science and climate

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Member Biographies." National Research Council. 2005. National Laboratories and Universities: Building New Ways to Work Together: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11190.
×

policy research programs at PNNL. Prior to taking on this assignment, she served as associate director for strategic planning at PNNL. Dr. Geffen has been with PNNL since 1977, with more than 25 years of experience in strategic technology planning and assessment, environmental regulatory policy and risk assessment for energy, environmental management, and transportation systems. Dr. Geffen is recognized for her strengths in building and managing teams to achieve results and has had significant program and line management responsibilities at PNNL, including leadership of a research group in Washington, D.C., focused on energy and environmental policy. Dr. Geffen holds a B.S. in civil and environmental engineering from Stanford University, an M.B.A. from the University of Washington, and a Ph.D. in technology management and policy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Geffen is also an adjunct faculty member in the Business School at Washington State University, Tri-Cities, where she teaches graduate courses in technology strategy and management of R&D.


Dan Hartley retired from Sandia National Laboratories as vice president for laboratory development. In that role he was responsible for strategic management of the laboratories including management of an $80 million dollar discretionary research fund, leadership in strategic planning, business development, industry and university partnerships, congressional relations and information technology. His 31 years of experience have included 18 years at Sandia’s Livermore, California site where he founded and developed DOE’s Combustion Research Facility, a premier international research center. In his role as vice president of laboratory development, which began in 1995, Dr. Hartley personally emphasized the development of industry and university partnerships. Under his leadership, Sandia has been recognized as a leader in partnerships among the DOE national laboratories. He is frequently invited to speak on partnerships and has testified before Congress on their merits and challenges. He served as chairman of the AMTEX (American Textile) Industry-Lab Partnership Board. Dr. Hartley founded the Sandia Science and Technology Park and developed supporting relationships with the Department of Energy, the City of Albuquerque, and the State of New Mexico. Since retiring from Sandia, Dr. Hartley has remained active in university advisory roles, and economic development across New Mexico; he is chairman of the board of Khoral Research Inc., a software company in Albuquerque.


John Peoples is a senior scientist in the Fermilab Experimental Astrophysics Group and director of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. He joined Fermilab in 1972 and, over the course of 16 years was engaged in the construction and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Member Biographies." National Research Council. 2005. National Laboratories and Universities: Building New Ways to Work Together: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11190.
×

management of experimental facilities and accelerators for high-energy physics. He had held the positions of both deputy director and director and was appointed director emeritus in 1999. A fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Peoples is currently the Chair of the Space Telescope Science Institute Visiting Committee. He also chairs the Cost and Schedule Review Committee for the Large Hadron Collider (European Center for Particle Physics). Dr. Peoples is currently a member of the Spallation Neutron Source Advisory Board, the University of California Science and Technology Panel, and the APS Committee of International Scientific Affairs. He received the Distinguished Associate Award in 1995 from the Secretary of Energy and the Distinguished Service Award from the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences of the National Science Foundation in 1999. Peoples received his Ph.D. in physics from Columbia University. He has served on two National Academy committees.


Julia Weertman’s areas of research and teaching center on the mechanical behavior of metals and alloys and the underlying phenomena that give rise to the observed behavior. Her research currently is focused on determining the mechanical properties of a variety of nanocrystalline materials, characterizing their structure, and studying deformation mechanisms in this small grain-size regime. She also continues to be interested in the high-temperature behavior of metals. Her research has demonstrated the value of small-angle neutron scattering for detection and quantification of such features as voids and pores and for following nucleation and growth kinetics of second-phase particles. Professor Weertman is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is a member of the Committee on Women in Science and Engineering and a past member of the Committee on Human Rights of the National Academies, and has served on several National Research Council (NRC) panels. Currently she is a member of the NRC National Materials Advisory Board. She has also served on advisory panels for DOE and NSF and for several national laboratories.


Robert Zimmer is provost and professor of mathematics at Brown University. Prior to joining Brown, Dr. Zimmer served in a number of administrative capacities at the University of Chicago, culminating in his appointment as vice president for research, and for Argonne National Laboratory where he focused on the interface and interaction between national laboratories and universities. A graduate of Brandeis University, Zimmer earned his graduate degrees at Harvard in mathematics. He began his academic career as assistant professor of mathematics at the U.S. Naval Academy, and later joined the University of Chicago faculty.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Member Biographies." National Research Council. 2005. National Laboratories and Universities: Building New Ways to Work Together: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11190.
×

He has also held visiting positions and long-term summer appointments at universities in Europe, Australia, and Israel. The author of two books and more than 80 research articles, Zimmer’s primary intellectual interests include ergodic theory, Lie groups, discrete subgroups, differential geometry, transformation groups, group representations, foliations and related questions of geometry, group theory, and analysis. He has served on the editorial boards of Ergodic Theory and Dynamical Systems, Transactions of the American Mathematical Society, Geometriae Dedicata, and Journal of Geometric Analysis and is series editor of the Chicago Lectures in Mathematics Series.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Member Biographies." National Research Council. 2005. National Laboratories and Universities: Building New Ways to Work Together: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11190.
×
Page 31
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Member Biographies." National Research Council. 2005. National Laboratories and Universities: Building New Ways to Work Together: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11190.
×
Page 32
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Member Biographies." National Research Council. 2005. National Laboratories and Universities: Building New Ways to Work Together: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11190.
×
Page 33
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Member Biographies." National Research Council. 2005. National Laboratories and Universities: Building New Ways to Work Together: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11190.
×
Page 34
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Member Biographies." National Research Council. 2005. National Laboratories and Universities: Building New Ways to Work Together: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11190.
×
Page 35
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Member Biographies." National Research Council. 2005. National Laboratories and Universities: Building New Ways to Work Together: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11190.
×
Page 36
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