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Implications of Nanotechnology for Environmental Health Research (2005)

Chapter: Appendix A Workshop Agenda

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Implications of Nanotechnology for Environmental Health Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11248.
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Appendix A
Workshop Agenda

TECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH: IMPLICATION OF NANOTECHNOLOGY

Sponsored by

The Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine

National Academy of Sciences Keck Building

500 5th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C.

MAY 27, 2004

Moderator: Paul G. Rogers, J.D., Roundtable Chair

8:30 a.m.

Opening Remarks

The Honorable Paul G. Rogers, J.D.

Chair, Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine

8:40 a.m.

Nanotechnology: Issues Involving Environmental Health and Safety

Kenneth Olden, Ph.D.

Director, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

9:00 a.m.

What is Nanotechnology?: Overview and Relevance to Environmental Health

Vicki L. Colvin, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Rice University

Executive Director, Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Implications of Nanotechnology for Environmental Health Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11248.
×

9:25 a.m.

Preparing for Nanotechnology: Health, Policy, and Emerging Issues

David Rejeski, M.P.A., M.E.D., B.F.A.

Director, Foresight and Governance Project, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

9:50 a.m.

Societal Implications of Nanotechnology Products

Douglas Mulhall

Author: Our Molecular Future

10:10 a.m.

General Discussion

10:25 a.m.

Break

The Promise of Nanotechnology

Moderator: Myron Harrison, M.D., M.P.H., Roundtable Member

10:40 a.m.

Nanotechnology and Environment: The New Future in Remediation

Barbara Karn, Ph.D.

National Center for Environmental Research

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

11:00 a.m.

Nanotechnology and Health: A Promise for Better Medicine?

Martin Philbert, Ph.D.

Associate Dean, School of Public Health, University of Michigan

11:20 a.m.

General Discussion

11:45 a.m.

Lunch

Nanotechnology: A Tale of Precaution?

Moderator: James Melius, M.D., Dr.P.H., Roundtable Member

12:30 p.m.

The Central Nervous System as a Target: The Good and the Bad

Eva Oberdörster, Ph.D.

Lecturer, Department of Biological Sciences, Southern Methodist University

12:50 p.m.

Potential for Bio-Uptake and Bioaccumulation of Nanotechnology Particles

David Warheit, Ph.D.

Toxicologist, Haskell Laboratory, DuPont, Inc.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Implications of Nanotechnology for Environmental Health Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11248.
×

1:10 p.m.

Ultrafine Particles and Health Risks

John Froines, Ph.D.

Professor, School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles

Director, Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, Southern California Particle Center and Supersite

1:25 p.m.

Moving Technology Research Forward: Public Perception and Concern

John Balbus, M.D., M.P.H.

Director, Environmental Health Program, Environmental Defense

1:45 p.m.

General Discussion

2:05 p.m.

Break

Nanotechnology: Governmental Involvement

Moderator: Lynn Goldman, M.D., M.P.H., Roundtable Vice-Chair

2:20 p.m.

Nanotechnology and Strategies to Ensure Occupational Health

Andrew Maynard, Ph.D.

Senior Service Fellow (Acting Team Leader), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

2:35 p.m.

Technologies for Improved Risk Stratification and Disease Prevention: Future Direction for NIEHS

William Suk, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Director, Center for Risk and Integrated Sciences

Director, Superfund Basic Research Program

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

2:55 p.m.

Approaches from the Canadian Government

Paul Glover, M.B.A.

Director General, Safe Environments Programme, Health Canada

3:15 p.m.

Technology and Regulation: Encouraging Research While Protecting Health and the Environment

Clayton Teague, Ph.D.

Director, National Nanotechnology Coordination Office, National Science Foundation

3:35 p.m.

General Discussion

4:25 p.m.

Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Implications of Nanotechnology for Environmental Health Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11248.
×
Page 47
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Implications of Nanotechnology for Environmental Health Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11248.
×
Page 48
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2005. Implications of Nanotechnology for Environmental Health Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11248.
×
Page 49
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Nanotechnology is often described as an emerging technology - one that not only holds promise for society, but also is capable of revolutionizing our approaches to common problems. Nanotechnology is not a completely new field; however, it is only recently that discoveries in this field have advanced so far as to warrant examination of their impact upon the world around us.

Nanotechnology has direct beneficial applications for medicine and the environment, but like all technologies it may have unintended effects that can adversely impact the environment, both within the human body and within the natural ecosystem. How does the science move forward in a way that best protects the public and gets health and safety right the first time? Implications of Nanotechnology for Environmental Health Research identifies the areas in which additional research is needed and the processes by which changes can occur.

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