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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2005. Prospective Evaluation of Applied Energy Research and Development at DOE (Phase One): A First Look Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11277.
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C
Presentations and Committee Meetings

Committee Meeting, The National Academies, Washington, D.C., February 10-11, 2004

Results of the Conference on Estimating Benefits of Government-Sponsored Energy R&D

Russell Lee, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Estimating Benefits of DOE’s Applied R&D: OMB Perspective and Interest

Robert Sandoli, Office of Management and Budget

Program Planning at NIST

Paul Doremus, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Estimating Prospective Energy R&D Benefits

Jay Braitsch and Mary Beth Zimmerman, U.S. Department of Energy

How the Science Committee Looks at DOE’s Applied R&D Portfolio

Kevin Carroll, House Subcommittee on Energy

A Skeptical View of DOE R&D (Time to Overhaul Federal Energy R&D)

Ronald Sutherland, Consulting Economist

Committee Meeting, The National Academies, Washington, D.C., April 14-15, 2004

Closed session

Panel on Benefits of Lighting R&D Subcommittee Meeting, The National Academies, Washington, D.C., July 8-9, 2004

LED Status and the Potential for Solid State Lighting

M.G. Craford, Lumileds Lighting, LLC

DOE Solid State Lighting Program

James R. Brodrick, U.S. Department of Energy

Estimating Benefits of the DOE Solid State Lighting Program

Frances Wood, OnLocation, Inc.

Lighting Design and Lighting Designers

Terry McGowan, Lighting Research Office

Panel on Benefits of Sequestration R&D Subcommittee Meeting, The National Academies, Washington, D.C., July 12-13, 2004

U.S. DOE Carbon Sequestration Program

Scott Klara, National Energy Technology Laboratory

Estimating Benefits for the Sequestration Subprogram

Darren Mollot, U.S. Department of Energy

Estimating Benefits for the Carbon Sequestration R&D Program: Key Questions

Jay Braitsch, U.S. Department of Energy

Committee Meeting, The National Academies, Washington, D.C., July 19-20, 2004

Benefits Analysis Methodologies

Sam Baldwin, Jay Braitsch, Allan Hoffman, Darren Mollot, MaryBeth Zimmerman, U.S. Department of Energy

Panel on Benefits of Fuel Cell R&D Subcommittee Meeting, The National Academies, Washington, D.C., July 20-21, 2004

Fuel Cell Subprogram

Patrick Davis, Kathi Epping, John Garbak, Nancy Garland, Donna Ho, Valri Lightner, Amy Manheim, U.S. Department of Energy

Overview of DOE FE Fuel Cell Program

Mark C. Williams, National Energy Technology Laboratory

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2005. Prospective Evaluation of Applied Energy Research and Development at DOE (Phase One): A First Look Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11277.
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Estimating Benefits of EERE Fuel Cell R&D

Philip Patterson, DOE/EERE; Frances Wood, OnLocation, Inc.; Chip Friley, Brookhaven National Laboratory

Estimating Benefits for the Fuel Cell Subprogram

Darren Mollot, U.S. Department of Energy

U.S. DOE FE Fuel Cell Program

Sam Biondo, U.S. Department of Energy

Panel on Benefits of Lighting R&D Subcommittee Meeting, The National Academies, Washington, D.C., August 2-3, 2004

Additional Material on Estimating Benefits of the DOE Lighting Program

Frances Wood, OnLocation, Inc.

DOE Lighting Research and Development Program: Conventional Lighting

James R. Brodrick, U.S. Department of Energy

Panel on Benefits of Fuel Cell R&D Subcommittee Meeting, The National Academies, Washington, D.C., August 18-19, 2004

DOE Hydrogen Program: Systems Analysis Workshop

Steve Chalk, U.S. Department of Energy

Recent Progress Related to Benefits Analysis

Steve Chalk, U.S. Department of Energy

Panel on Benefits of Sequestration R&D Subcommittee Meeting, The National Academies, Washington, D.C., September 23-24, 2004

Closed session

Committee Meeting, The National Academies, Irvine, California, October 20-23, 2004

Closed session

Committee Meeting, The National Academies, Washington, D.C., January 10-11, 2005

Closed session

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2005. Prospective Evaluation of Applied Energy Research and Development at DOE (Phase One): A First Look Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11277.
×
Page 60
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2005. Prospective Evaluation of Applied Energy Research and Development at DOE (Phase One): A First Look Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11277.
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In 2001, the National Research Council (NRC) completed a congressionally mandated assessment of the benefits and costs of DOE’s fossil energy and energy efficiency R&D programs, Energy Research at DOE: Was It Worth It? The Congress followed this retrospective study by directing DOE to request the NRC to develop a methodology for assessing prospective benefits. The first phase of this project—development of the methodology—began in December 2003. Phase two will make the methodology more robust and explore related issues, and subsequent phases will apply the methodology to review the prospective benefits of different DOE fossil energy and energy efficiency R&D programs. In developing this project, three considerations were particularly important. First, the study should adapt the work of the retrospective study. Second, the project should develop a methodology that provides a rigorous calculation of benefits and risks, and a practical and consistent process for its application. Third, the methodology should be transparent, should not require extensive resources for implementation, and should produce easily understood results. This report presents the results of phase one. It focuses on adaptation of the retrospective methodology to a prospective context.

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