National Academies Press: OpenBook

Network Science (2005)

Chapter: Appendix B Committee Meetings and Other Activities

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Meetings and Other Activities." National Research Council. 2005. Network Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11516.
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B
Committee Meetings and Other Activities

MEETINGS

First Committee Meeting, November 15–16, 2004, Washington, D.C.

BAST Network Science Overview

John Parmentola, director, Research and Laboratory Management, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army (Research and Technology)

Scope and Dimensions of Network Science

Charles Duke, vice president, Xerox Innovation Group, Wilson Center for Research and Technology

Dimensions of Network Science

Ronald Brachman, director, Information Processing Technology Office, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Joshua Epstein, senior fellow, The Brookings Institution

Coordination Science as Part of Network Science

Thomas Malone, director and professor, Center for Coordination Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Network Science and Network-centric Operations: An Industry Perspective

Jack Pellicci, group vice president, Oracle Public Sector

Networks Are Ubiquitous

John Hopcroft, Jett IBM professor, Cornell University

Network Science First Thoughts

Richard DeMillo, John P. Imlay, Jr., dean of computing, Georgia Institute of Technology

Collective Dynamics of Small World Networks

Steven Strogatz, professor, Cornell University

Dimensions of Net Science: What Makes a Net?

Will Leland, chief scientist, Telcordia Technologies

Second Committee Meeting, February 1–2, 2005, Washington, D.C.

Army Networks for Net-Centric Operations

LTG Steve Boutelle, chief information officer, Department of the Army

National and International Views on Systems Biology

Adam Arkin, assistant professor, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Network Science in the New Program in Systems Biology at Harvard University

Pamela Silver, professor, Harvard University

Army Research in Network Science

Anathram Swami, ARL fellow, Army Research Laboratory

Applications of Network Science in Business and Military Organizations

Thomas Malone, director, Center for Coordination Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The “New” Science of Networks

Duncan Watts, assistant professor, Columbia University

Third Committee Meeting, April 13–15, 2005, Washington, D.C.

Mapping the Expertise and Social Network of Network Science Researchers

Katy Börner, associate professor, Indiana University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Meetings and Other Activities." National Research Council. 2005. Network Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11516.
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Fighting the Networked Force: Insights from Network-centric Operations Case Studies

John Garstka, assistant director, Office of the Secretary of Defense, Office of Force Transformation

High-Performance Computing for Army R&D in the Bio Sciences and Synergies with C2 Networks

Amado Cordova, RAND Arroyo Center

Network Science and Net-centric Warfare

LtGen Paul van Riper, U.S. Marine Corps (retired)

Fourth Meeting, May 12–13, 2005, Woods Hole, Massachusetts

Writing meeting

TELECONFERENCES

First Full-Message Draft Teleconference, March 31, 2005

Research Initiatives in Network Science, April 13, 2005

Participants

John Doyle, California Institute of Technology

Stuart Milner, University of Maryland

Research Initiatives in Network Science, April 28, 2005

Participant

P.R. Kumar, University of Illinois

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Meetings and Other Activities." National Research Council. 2005. Network Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11516.
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Page 58
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Meetings and Other Activities." National Research Council. 2005. Network Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11516.
×
Page 59
Next: Appendix C Content of Network Science Courses »
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The U.S. Army depends on a broad array of interacting physical, informational, cognitive, and social networks. Nevertheless, fundamental understanding about these networks is primitive. This gap between what is known and what is needed to ensure the smooth operation of complex networks makes the Army’s transformation to a force capable of network-centric operations (NCO) problematic. To help address this problem, the Army asked the National Research Council to find out whether identifying and funding “network science” research could help close this gap. This book presents an assessment of the importance and content of network science as it exists today. The book also provides an analysis of how the Army might advance the transformation to NCO operations by supporting fundamental research on networks. The study finds that networks are indispensable to the defense of the United States. In addition, there is no science today that offers the fundamental knowledge necessary to design large, complex networks in a predictable manner. The study also concluded that current federal funding of network research is focused on specific applications and not on advancing fundamental knowledge.

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