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Review and Assessment of the Health and Productivity Benefits of Green Schools: An Interim Report (2006)

Chapter: Role of the Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment

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Suggested Citation:"Role of the Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment." National Research Council. 2006. Review and Assessment of the Health and Productivity Benefits of Green Schools: An Interim Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11574.
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Role of the Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment

The Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment (BICE) was established by the National Research Council (NRC) in 1946 as the Building Research Advisory Board. BICE and its predecessor organizations have been the principal units of the NRC concerned with the relationship between the constructed and natural environments and their interaction with human activities. Principal areas of focus include:

  • Human factors and the built environment,

  • Project management methods,

  • Construction methods and materials,

  • Security of facilities and critical infrastructure,

  • Multihazard mitigation methods,

  • Construction and utilization of underground space, and

  • Infrastructure and community building.

The BICE brings together experts from a wide range of scientific, engineering, and social science disciplines to discuss potential studies of interest; develop and frame study tasks; ensure proper project planning; suggest possible reviewers for reports produced by fully independent ad hoc study committees; and convene meetings to examine strategic issues. The board members listed in the front of this document were not asked to endorse the committee’s conclusions or recommendations, nor did they see the final draft of this report before its release.

Additional information about the BICE can be obtained online at http://www.nationalacademies.org/bice.

Suggested Citation:"Role of the Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment." National Research Council. 2006. Review and Assessment of the Health and Productivity Benefits of Green Schools: An Interim Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11574.
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Some educational professionals have suggested that so-called green schools would result in superior performance and increased health for students and teachers. While there is no commonly accepted definition of a green school, there are a number of attributes that such schools appear to have: low cost operations, security, healthy and comfortable, and an environment that enhances learning are among them. To determine the health and productivity benefits of green schools, the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, the Barr and Kendall Foundations, the Connecticut Clean Energy Fund, and the U.S. Green Building Council asked the NRC to examine available studies about the effects of green schools on student learning and teacher productivity. This interim report presents an evaluation of evidence for relationships between various health, learning, and productivity outcomes and five characteristics of green schools: the building envelope, ventilation, lighting, acoustics, and condition. The final report will present evaluations for additional characteristics, a synthesis of the results of all assessments, and promising areas of research.

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