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Suggested Citation:"Appendix L. Description of USAID Recruitment Programs." National Research Council. 2006. The Fundamental Role of Science and Technology in International Development: An Imperative for the U.S. Agency for International Development. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11583.
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Appendix L
Description of USAID Recruitment Programs

AGENCY EXPLAINS HOW TO GET A JOB AT USAID1

It’s late fall, and many graduates are wondering how to apply for work at USAID. Here is a brief introduction to the kind of background, education, and job experience the Agency is looking for as it seeks to fill positions that become open each year.

USAID recruitment is a year-round process. At the Office of Human Resources, efforts focus mainly on attracting new foreign service officers at junior and mid-levels.

The only way to apply for a job at USAID is on the internet. Jobs are advertised on USAID’s website at regular intervals during the year, and prospective applicants are encouraged to log on frequently.

On the foreign service (FS) side, recruiters are looking for candidates with a wide range of master’s degrees, from international relations to public health. People with law degrees and doctoral candidates can also apply.

Experience is also considered. For FS candidates, overseas experience is almost always a must. Working for the Peace Corps, a nongovernmental organization, international organization, or for-profit contractor overseas can provide valuable experience.

1  

USAID Front Lines, Nov. 2005.(see www.usaid.gov/press/frontlines)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix L. Description of USAID Recruitment Programs." National Research Council. 2006. The Fundamental Role of Science and Technology in International Development: An Imperative for the U.S. Agency for International Development. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11583.
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FS candidates can apply for one or two tracks. For both programs, USAID advises candidates to expect to be based overseas for most of their careers.

  • New Entry Professional (NEP) Program. Typically, successful candidates for this mid-level track have five to seven years’ development experience overseas plus a master’s degree. NEPs normally spend 12–18 months in Washington, D.C., before being assigned overseas.

  • International Development Intern (IDI) Program. While previous work experience is not required, most successful applicants have one to two years’ overseas experience. Students need to apply while in graduate school or within a year after completing graduate school. IDIs can expect to be assigned overseas roughly six months after joining USAID.

Potential applicants should know that the FS hiring process—from submitting an application to coming on duty—can take up to a year. Security clearance, medical clearance, and other factors can contribute to this length of time.

USAID also hires many civil service employees to work in Washington, D.C. These openings are advertised on an individual basis.

The Presidential Management Fellows (PMF) Program is another entry to the civil service for people with recent master’s degrees. USAID is the second largest employer of PMFs in the federal government.

There are also Foreign Service Limited Appointments. These are five-year appointments and, generally, not career tracks. USAID uses these to cover hard-to-fill positions.

The only way to apply for a job at USAID is on the internet. Jobs are advertised on USAID’s website at regular intervals during the year, and prospective applicants are encouraged to log on frequently.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix L. Description of USAID Recruitment Programs." National Research Council. 2006. The Fundamental Role of Science and Technology in International Development: An Imperative for the U.S. Agency for International Development. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11583.
×
Page 147
Suggested Citation:"Appendix L. Description of USAID Recruitment Programs." National Research Council. 2006. The Fundamental Role of Science and Technology in International Development: An Imperative for the U.S. Agency for International Development. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11583.
×
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In October 2003 the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the National Research Council (NRC) entered into a cooperative agreement. The agreement called for the NRC to examine selected aspects of U.S. foreign assistance activities—primarily the programs of the USAID—that have benefited or could benefit from access to strong science, technology, and medical capabilities in the United States or elsewhere. After considering the many aspects of the role of science and technology (S&T) in foreign assistance, the study led to the publication of The Fundamental Role of Science and Technology in International Development. In the book special attention is devoted to partnerships that involve the USAID together with international, regional, U.S. governmental, and private sector organizations in fields such as heath care, agriculture and nutrition, education and job creation, and energy and the environment. This book explores specific programmatic, organizational, and personnel reforms that would increase the effective use of S&T to meet the USAID's goals while supporting larger U.S. foreign policy objectives.

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