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Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners (2007)

Chapter: E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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E
Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE

Lawrence O. Gostin, JD, LLD (Chair) is an internationally recognized scholar in law and public health. He has been awarded degrees from the Georgetown University School of Law and The Johns Hopkins University School of Public Policy. He is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies and an elected fellow of the Hastings Center. At the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), he currently serves on the Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, is a member of the Committee to Enhance the Effectiveness of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Quarantine Station Expansion Plan for U.S. Points of Entry, and recently served as chair of the Committee on Genomics and the Public’s Health in the 21st Century. Professor Gostin is the health law and ethics editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association and serves on the editorial boards of many other scholarly journals. His recent books include The AIDS Pandemic: Complacency, Injustice, and Unfulfilled Expectations (2004), The Human Rights of Persons with Intellectual Disabilities: Different But Equal (2003, with S. S. Herr, H. H. Koh, eds.), Public Health Law and Ethics: A Reader (2002), and Public Health Law: Power, Duty, Restraint (2000). Professor Gostin is the John Carroll Research Professor of Law at the Georgetown University Law School. He also directs the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Collaborating Center Promoting Health Through Law.

Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
×

Hortensia Amaro, PhD, is a distinguished professor of health sciences at the Bouve College of Health Sciences at Northeastern University (NEU) and director of the Institute on Urban Health Research at NEU. She received her doctoral degree from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1982 and was awarded an honorary doctoral degree in humane letters by Simmons College in 1994. Over the last 20 years, Dr. Amaro’s work has focused on improving the connections between public health research and public health practice. Her research has focused on epidemiological and community-based studies of alcohol and drug use among adolescents and adults, on the effectiveness of HIV/AIDS prevention programs, and on substance abuse and mental health treatment issues for women. In 1996, Dr. Amaro was appointed to the Board of the Boston Public Health Commission by Mayor Thomas Menino. She currently serves as vice-chair of the board. She has recently served as an appointed member of the National Advisory Council of the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Dr. Amaro has also served on several committees at the National Research Council related to social and behavioral research; substance abuse, mental health, and AIDS; and legal and ethical issues for women in clinical studies.


Patricia Blair, PhD, JD, is vice-president and university counsel at the University of Texas Health Center in Tyler, Texas and adjunct associate professor in the School of Nursing. She is also university compliance office and university ethics officer. Her research has focused on nursing ethics, law and policy; legal and ethical issues related to correctional health care; and the provision of health-care services in prison settings. Dr. Blair is a member of the board of directors of the American Association of Nurse Attorneys. She received her MSN from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, her JD from Texas Southern University, her LLM in Health Law and Policy from the University of Houston Law School, and her PhD from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Clinical Sciences Health Services Research with a focus on health disparities research.


Steve Cambra, Jr., is co-owner of Cambra, Larson & Associates, a criminal justice consulting firm that advises prison facilities on compliance with federal and state regulations. He has spent 35 years working in the corrections industry. Mr. Cambra began as a corrections officer in 1970 at the California Men’s Colony and was gradually promoted through management and administrative ranks. He served as warden of Pelican Bay State Prison for almost 3 years before being promoted to chief deputy director for field operations with the California Department of Corrections. Mr. Cambra also served as director of the California Department of Corrections. In this position, he was responsible for approximately 122,000 parolees and 160,000 inmates in a system that included 33 prisons, 38 conserva-

Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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tion camps, 16 community correctional facilities, 35 work furlough and prisoner mother community-based programs, and more than 100 parole offices statewide. He currently advises the California Youth Authority. Mr. Cambra earned a BA in social science at Stanislaus State College.


G. David Curry, PhD, is an ex-prisoner. He is a professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri, St. Louis. He is currently conducting outcome evaluations of a number of St. Louis programs designed to reduce youth violence. Dr. Curry is coauthor of Confronting Gangs: Crime and Community (2002) and author of Sunshine Patriots: Punishment and the Vietnam Offender (1985) as well as book chapters and research articles. He is a member of the American Society of Criminology, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. He has received the Boys and Girls Club of America Advocacy Award (2001) and his university’s Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Service (2004). Dr. Curry received his PhD in sociology from the University of Chicago. He also completed postdoctoral studies there with a specialization in evaluation research methods. Dr. Curry served as chair of a university institutional review board (IRB) committee (2 years) and as a prisoner representative on an IRB (6 years).


Cynthia A. Gómez, PhD, is the founding director of Health Equity Initiatives at San Francisco State University where she leads efforts to enhance and integrate campus research, curricula, community service, and training programs that address health disparities and/or promote health equity in the United States. She previously served as codirector of the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies (CAPS) at the University of California at San Francisco where she was also an associate professor in the Department of Medicine and leading scientist in HIV prevention research since 1991. She received her master’s degree in psychology from Harvard and her PhD in Clinical Psychology from Boston University. Prior to her work with CAPS, Dr. Gómez spent 12 years working in community health settings, including five as director of a child and family mental health center in Boston. Dr. Gómez is considered a pioneer in the areas of cultural determinants in sexual behaviors among Latinos, in the role of power dynamics in sexual risk among women, and in the development of HIV prevention interventions, including interventions for people living with HIV. Dr Gómez is a nationally renowned speaker and an expert in the field of HIV prevention and sexual health. She has served on several national committees including the Center for Disease Control’s HIV and STD Advisory Council, the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s (NIDA) National Hispanic Science Network, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) Advisory Committee on Women’s Services.

Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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She is a member and past chair of the board of directors of the Guttmacher Institute. She serves on several other boards of directors including the National AIDS Fund, Public Responsibility in Medicine & Research, and the Pacific Institute for Women’s Health. Dr Gómez was also an appointed member to the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS under both WJ Clinton and GW Bush administrations.


Bradford H. Gray, PhD, is a principal research associate at the Urban Institute and editor of The Milbank Quarterly, a journal of population health and health policy. He was formerly a study director at the IOM, a faculty member at Yale University, and director of the health policy division at the New York Academy of Medicine. He earlier served on the staff of the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research and was a consultant on IRBs to the President’s Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine and Research. He has published extensively on matters pertaining to the ethics of human experimentation, for-profit and nonprofit health care, and the changing conditions of medical professionalism. His books include Human Subjects in Medical Experimentation: The Conduct and Regulation of Clinical Research (1975) and The Profit Motive and Patient Care: The Changing Accountability of Doctors and Hospitals (1991). Dr. Gray holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Oklahoma State University and a PhD in sociology from Yale University. He is a fellow of The Hastings Center, AcademyHealth, and the New York Academy of Medicine. Dr. Gray is a member of the IOM.


Michael S. Hamden, JD, is executive director of North Carolina Prisoner Legal Services, Inc., a public service, nonprofit organization for prisoners and others detained in the criminal justice system in North Carolina. He also serves as a prisoner representative for the Research Triangle Institute’s IRBs. Mr. Hamden is a member of the North Carolina Bar Association, where he currently serves as chair of the Section on Constitutional Rights and Responsibilities. He is also a member of the North Carolina Academy of Trial Lawyers and served as chair of the North Carolina Legal Services Planning Council. Mr. Hamden is a member of the American Bar Association, serving as cochair on the Corrections and Sentencing Committee and as liaison to the American Correctional Association (ACA). In the ACA, Mr. Hamden is a member of the Standards Committee and the Commission on Accreditation for Corrections, both as commissioner and as a member of the Executive Committee. He has written extensively on the provision of legal services to prison populations, most recently coediting The Law and Policy of Sentencing and Corrections (7th ed., 2005) with law professor

Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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Lynn S. Branham. Hamden earned a JD at the University of Tennessee College of Law and a bachelor of music degree at Berklee College of Music.


Jeffrey L. Metzner, MD, is clinical professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and associate director of the Forensic Psychiatry Fellowship Program. He is a member of the American Psychiatric Association and immediate past chair of its Council on Psychiatry and the Law. He also holds memberships with the American Academy of Psychiatry and Law, American Academy of Forensic Sciences, American College of Legal Medicine, and American Correctional Association. Dr. Metzner has written extensively on the psychiatric care of prison populations. He received his MD from the University of Maryland Medical School.


Jonathan Moreno, PhD, is the Emily Davie and Joseph S. Kornfield Professor of Biomedical Ethics and director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics at the University of Virginia. Dr. Moreno is an elected member of the IOM, a bioethics consultant for the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, a faculty affiliate of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics at Georgetown University, and a fellow of the Hastings Center. He was a member of the National Human Research Protection Advisory Committee and during 1994–1995 was senior policy and research analyst for the President’s Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments. He is currently a member of the Health Sciences Policy Board of the IOM and served as cochair for the Committee on Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Among his books are Is There an Ethicist in the House: On the Cutting Edge of Bioethics (2005) and Undue Risk: Secret State Experiments on Humans (2001).


Larry Palmer, LLB, is the endowed chair in urban health policy at the University of Louisville, Kentucky, with appointments in the Department of Family and Community Medicine, Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy and Law, and School of Public Health and Information Sciences. Before joining the University of Louisville, he was a professor at Cornell University Law School in Ithaca, New York. Professor Palmer is the author of Law, Medicine, and Social Justice (1989), Endings and Beginnings: Law, Medicine and Society in Assisted Life and Death (2000), and numerous articles dealing with law, medicine, and health policy. Professor Palmer is also the executive producer and author of the study guide of the prize-winning educational video Susceptible to Kindness: Miss Evers’ Boys and the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. He is a member of the board of directors of the Hastings Center in Garrison, New York. Previously, Professor Palmer served as a director of the National Patient Safety Foundation (1997–2002) and a

Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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trustee of the Phillips Exeter Academy (1990–2000). He was a member of the Committee on Establishing a National Cord Blood Stem Cell Bank Program with the IOM.


Norman Poythress, PhD, is professor in the Department of Mental Health Law and Policy at the Florida Mental Health Institute at the University of South Florida. He received his PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Texas, Austin in 1977. Dr. Poythress has previously worked at the Center for Forensic Psychiatry in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and the Taylor Hardin Secure Medical Facility in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. He is a past president of the American Psychology-Law Society (Division 41 of the American Psychological Association) and was the recipient in 1990 of the American Academy of Forensic Psychology’s Award for Distinguished Contributions to Forensic Psychology. Dr. Poythress was a consultant to the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Mental Health and the Law from 1989 to 1996. He is coauthor of Psychological Evaluations for the Courts: A Handbook for Mental Health Professionals and Lawyers, and his current research interests include forensic evaluation, psychopathy, and risk assessment. He is a member of the American Psychological Association and the International Association for Forensic Mental Health Services.


William J. Rold, JD, CC HP-A, is a practicing civil rights attorney in New York City. A substantial part of his practice involves representing prisoners in lawsuits concerning health care and other rights. He also publishes, lectures, and consults with correctional health-care officials throughout the United States and abroad. He was a staff attorney for the Prisoners’ Rights Project in New York for 10 years. Mr. Rold represents the American Bar Association on the board of directors of the National Commission on Correctional Health Care and has served on the IRB of the New York City Department of Health for research involving prisoner subjects. Mr. Rold earned his juris doctor in 1977 from Georgetown University Law Center and holds his advanced certification as a correctional health-care professional. He serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Prison Health. He was honored with the Bernard P. Harrison Award of Merit for his service to correctional health care by the National Commission on Correctional Health Care in St. Louis in 2000. Mr. Rold was recently appointed a vice-chair of the Corrections Committee of the American Bar Association.


Janette Y. Taylor, PhD, is associate professor in the College of Nursing at the University of Iowa. She is a certified women’s health-care nurse practitioner with specialization in obstetrics, gynecological, and neonatal nursing. Dr. Taylor’s research has focused on race/ethnicity as variables in

Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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nursing research, African American women’s experience of domestic violence, the health of women prisoners, reconnecting incarcerated women with their children, and using narrative art therapy with incarcerated abused women. She completed her PhD at the University of Washington.


Wendy Visscher, PhD, is director of RTI International’s Office of Research Protection and Ethics. RTI is an independent, nonprofit organization that conducts research and development projects for government and commercial clients worldwide. Dr. Visscher oversees the operation of RTI’s three IRBs and chairs one of these committees. The IRBs review, approve, and monitor all human subjects research conducted by RTI, including both biomedical and sociobehavioral research. Dr. Visscher maintains RTI’s federal-wide assurance with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (DHHS) Office for Human Research Protections. She has expertise in DHHS and Food and Drug Administration human subjects protection regulations, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and other privacy laws, and international guidelines and state laws that relate to research. She provides guidance and training for researchers and legal and regulatory staff on human subjects and privacy issues and earned her certified IRB professional (CIP) rating in 2002. Dr. Visscher is also an experienced researcher and holds a master’s of public health and a PhD in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota.


Barry Zack, MPH, is executive director of Centerforce, a nongovernment organization working with prisoners, their families, and persons recently released from jails and prisons in Northern and Central California. He is also an associate clinical professor at the University of California, San Francisco, in the Department of Community Health Systems at the School of Nursing. He has been a direct service provider and community researcher working with incarcerated populations since 1986. Mr. Zack has published research and presented at professional conferences on behavioral intervention strategies to prevent HIV, hepatitis, and sexually transmitted diseases and reduce risk behavior among prisoners; he has consulted with many department of corrections on effective behavioral interventions in the correctional setting. He is on the editorial board of Infectious Diseases in Corrections Report (formerly HEPP Report) and the Journal of Correctional Health Care. Mr. Zack was an external consultant for the CDC’s Prevention and Control of Infections with Hepatitis Viruses in Correctional Settings program as well as the Surgeon General’s “Call to Action on Corrections and Community Health.”

Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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EXPERT ADVISER

Nancy Neveloff Dubler, LLB, is the director of the Division of Bioethics, Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Montefiore Medical Center and Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She received her BA from Barnard College and her LLB from the Harvard Law School. Ms. Dubler directs the Bioethics Consultation Service at Montefiore Medical Center (founded in 1978) as a support for analysis of difficult clinical cases presenting ethical issues in the health-care setting; this service uses mediation as its process. She lectures extensively and is the author of numerous articles and books on termination of care, home care and long-term care, geriatrics, prison and jail health care, and AIDS. She is codirector of the Certificate Program in Bioethics and the Medical Humanities, conducted jointly by Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine with Cardozo Law School of Yeshiva University. Her most recent books are: Ethics On Call: Taking Charge of Life-and Death Choices in Today’s Health Care System, with David Nimmons, Vintage Press, (1993); Bioethics Mediation: A Guide to Shaping Shared Solutions, coauthor, Carol Liebman, United Hospital Fund, (2004); The Ethics and Regulation of Research with Human Subjects, Carl Coleman, Jerry Menikoff, Jesse Goldner, and Nancy Dubler, LexisNexis, (2005). She consults often with federal agencies, national working groups, and bioethics centers.

LIAISON PANEL: FORMER PRISONERS AND PRISONER ADVOCATES

Edward Anthony was an inmate in Philadelphia’s Holmesburg Prison in the 1960s. During that time he took part in a series on medical experiments that included patch tests, diet studies, and psychotropic drug experiments for the U.S. Army. Since becoming fully aware of how he and other former prisoners were used and misused as experimental material in the book Acres of Skin, Mr. Edwards has become an activist on the subject of ethical research and has spoken at numerous colleges, including Brown, Pennsylvania State, and Holy Family Universities. Mr. Edwards is currently working on a book with Allen Hornblum of Temple University concerning his life as a human guinea pig.


Jack Beck has been the director of the Prison Visiting Project at the Correctional Association (CA) of New York since October 2004. The CA has statutory authority to inspect prisons in New York State and to report findings to the legislature and public. In addition, the project has issued major reports on prison health care, disciplinary segregation, and treatment

Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
×

of inmates with mental illness. Before his association with CA, Mr. Beck was a senior supervising attorney at the Prisoners’ Right Project of the Legal Aid Society, where he worked for 23 years. He specialized in medical care issues, with particular focus on HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C. Mr. Beck is also a member of several statewide coalitions concerned with medical and mental health care in prisons that have been advocating for legislation to improve care of inmates. Mr. Beck has been a member of the New York Academy of Medicine IRB as the prisoner representative for 6 years. From 2003 to 2005, he was a member of the DHHS Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections, Subcommittee on Subpart C: Prisoners Research.


Debra Breuklander is a nurse consultant at MECCA, a residential inpatient substance abuse treatment program in Des Moines, Iowa. She previously worked as therapeutic community mentor and staff assistant while incarcerated at the Iowa Correctional Institution for Women. Ms. Breuklander has presented on child abuse prevention, reentry programs, and family transition in prison populations. She is currently vice-president of the Iowa Correctional Institution for Women Therapeutic Community Advisory Board and a member of the Friends of Iowa Women Prisoners.


James Dahl is a clinical psychologist and sociologist focused on research development, field implementation of evidence-based treatment, and collaborative community projects. He is currently directing research development for the largest substance abuse treatment organization in the United States, Phoenix House, managing a portfolio of competitive research grants in applied research related to therapeutic community and related treatment strategies for substance abuse. Dr. Dahl formerly served as director of Research Development, Research Foundation of City University of New York, driving a strategic research development program in biomedical and other bio-based technology, photonics, and aquaculture for the 20-campus system, which supports $250 million in research annually. He also served as vice-president of Washington-based University Research Corporation for more than six years, specializing in federally sponsored research to application of evidence-based programs through training and site development. Dr. Dahl has held positions as a university professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook (School of Medicine/Psychiatry and School of Social Work) and Hofstra University. He was a senior grants officer for a private foundation and a consultant for Washington-based WESTAT and Macro International, delivering technical assistance to state drug treatment programs for SAMHSA’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment as well as Atlanta University, Crime and Justice Institute, and Howard University, Center for Drug Abuse Research. He also served for six years as

Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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vice-president of the University Research Corporation in Bethesda, Maryland, conducting federal research and practice dissemination projects for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, and Department of Education. He is currently a review panelist for SAMHSA, U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), and National Institute of Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network Concept Wave Reviews. Dr. Dahl is a current member of the American Psychological Association, American Psychological Society, and the New York Academy of Sciences. He is board certified in cognitive-behavioral therapy and hypnotherapy.


Allen Hornblum has spent many years in government and has an extensive background working in the criminal justice system. He has served as chief of staff of the Philadelphia Sheriff’s Office and on the boards of the Pennsylvania Crime Commission, the Pennsylvania Commission of Crime and Delinquency, and the Philadelphia Prison System Board of Trustees. Mr. Hornblum’s book Acres of Skin is the leading work on the subject of America’s use of prison inmates as test subjects for medical experiments. He has recently completed a documentary on the Holmesburg experiments. Mr. Hornblum has also lectured on the subject at an array of institutions of higher learning, including Brown and Columbia universities, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the British Medical Association. Mr. Hornblum has also written Philadelphia City Hall (2003), a photographic history of Philadelphia’s City Hall and Confessions of a Second Story Man: Junior Kripplebauer and the K&A Gang, which is scheduled for release in May 2005. He is currently working on two books, one of which will document the life of a former inmate test subject and his lasting resentment toward the medical establishment.


Daniel Murphy is currently a professor in the Department of Political Science and Justice Studies at Appalachian State University. He is also author of “Aspirin Ain’t Gonna Help the Kind of Pain I’m In: Health Care Delivery in the Federal Bureau of Prisons,” which appears in Convict Criminology. Dr. Murphy’s research is based on his personal experience, having been imprisoned in the federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) for 5 years. He is also an active member of the Convict Criminologists group. Dr. Murphy is cochair of the Federal Citizens United for the Rehabilitation of Errants’ (FedCURE) Legislative Action Committee. He also serves as a member of FedCURE’s Board of Directors.


Barry Nakell, Esq., is a former professor of law and an attorney who has been an advocate for the rights of prisoners over the last 30 years. Mr. Nakell represented the prisoner class in the seminal case, Bounds v. Smith,

Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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which established that prisoners have a right of access to the courts. After his victory in that case, in 1978 Mr. Nakell was the moving force in the creation of North Carolina Prisoner Legal Services, Inc., and has continuously served as a member of its board of directors.


Osvaldo Rivera is a 50-year-old Latino, born and raised in Puerto Rico. He has worked in the field of human services for approximately 10 years. Mr. Rivera was a member of the Consumer Advisory Board for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. He currently serves on the Ryan White Planning Council. For the last five years, Mr. Rivera’s work consisted of providing reintegration services to offenders and ex-offenders. He is affiliated with Span Inc., which specializes in providing reintegration services in the greater Boston, Massachusetts, area. Mr. Rivera’s main focus is HIV/ AIDS-positive men and those who are at high risk for acquiring and transmitting HIV/AIDS, hepatitis, and other sexually transmitted infections. After a long battle with addiction and many years spent in and out of prisons, Mr. Rivera made the commitment to work with people like himself. He went to school to further his education and became a certified addiction specialist and a licensed alcohol and drug counselor. He earned respect and a good reputation within his community as a positive role model and leader. Mr. Rivera’s desire is to continue his positive work in order to empower and strengthen others in need.


Jeffrey Ian Ross is an associate professor in the Division of Criminology, Criminal Justice, and Social Policy and a research fellow at the Center for Comparative and International Law at the University of Baltimore. He has conducted research, written, and lectured on national security, political violence, political crime, policing, and corrections for more than 15 years. His work has appeared in many academic journals and books as well as popular magazines. He is the author of Making News of Police Violence (Praeger, 2000), coauthor (with Stephen C. Richards) of Behind Bars: Surviving Prison (Macmillan, 2002), editor of Controlling State Crime (2nd ed., Transaction Books, 2000), Violence in Canada: Sociopolitical Perspectives (Oxford University Press, 1995), Cutting the Edge: Current Perspectives in Radical/Critical Criminology and Criminal Justice (Praeger, 1998), Varieties of State Crime and Its Control (Criminal Justice Press, 1999), and coeditor, with Stephen C. Richards, of Convict Criminology (Wadsworth, 2002). In 1986 Ross was the lead expert witness for the Senate of Canada’s Special Committee on Terrorism and Public Safety. He received his PhD in political science from the University of Colorado and was a social science analyst with the NIJ, a division of the DOJ, before coming to the University of Baltimore.

Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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Jean Scott is the Deputy Regional Director of the New York City and Correctional Treatment Programs at Phoenix Houses of New York, the largest substance abuse treatment organization in the United States. Ms. Scott first joined Phoenix House in 1970; subsequently served as Manager of Purchasing and Corporate Relations; Senior Director/Assistant to the Associate Director of Phelan Place; Regional and Facility Director at the Hart Island complex; and Assistant Director of the Far Rockaway facility. From 1983 to 2000 she served as Vice-President, Director of Adult Programs and in 2000, she was promoted to Deputy Regional Director, New York City and Correctional Treatment Programs for Phoenix Houses of New York, where she oversees budgets in excess of $10 million for residential programs. She was also responsible for development, coordination, and implementation of a joint initiative with the New York State Department of Corrections, providing drug treatment for incarcerated offenders. She has served on the OASAS Credentialing Board; the Argus Community, Inc., ACT I, Private Sector Advisory Board; and the Board of Trustees at St. Francis College. In 1993, she received the 9th Fannie Lou Hamer award and in 1996 the 7th Annual Founders award from the Black Agency Executives. Ms. Scott is a credentialed alcohol and substance abuse counselor (CASAC), a certified addictions specialist (CAS) and a certified criminal justice addictions specialist (CCJAS); and she currently sits on the OASAS Appeals Board.

STAFF

Andrew Pope, PhD, is director of the board on Health Sciences Policy in the IOM. With a PhD in physiology and biochemistry, his primary interests are in science policy, biomedical ethics, and the environmental and occupational influences on human health. During his tenure at the National Academies and since 1989 at the IOM, Dr. Pope has directed numerous studies on topics that range from injury control, disability prevention, and biologic markers to the protection of human subjects of research, NIH priority-setting processes, organ procurement and transplantation policy, and the role of science and technology in countering terrorism. Dr. Pope is the recipient of the NAS President’s Special Achievement Award and the IOM’s Cecil Award.


Adrienne Stith Butler, PhD, is a senior program officer in the Board on Health Sciences Policy of the IOM. She is currently study director for the IOM Committee on Understanding Premature Birth and Assuring Healthy Outcomes. Previously, Dr. Stith Butler served as study director for the IOM report, Preparing for the Psychological Consequences of Terrorism: A Public Health Strategy conducted within the Board on Neuroscience and Be-

Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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havioral Health. She has also served as a staff officer for IOM reports, In the Nation’s Compelling Interest: Ensuring Diversity in the Health-Care Workforce and Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care, conducted within the Board on Health Sciences Policy. Before working at the IOM, Dr. Stith Butler served as the James Marshall Public Policy Scholar, a fellowship cosponsored by the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues and the American Psychological Association (APA). In this position, based at the APA in Washington, D.C., she engaged in policy analysis and monitored legislative issues related to ethnic disparities in health care and health research, racial profiling, and mental health counseling provisions in the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Dr. Stith Butler, a clinical psychologist, received her doctorate in 1997 from the University of Vermont. She completed postdoctoral fellowships in adolescent medicine and pediatric psychology at the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, New York.


Susan McCutchen is a research associate for this study. She has been on staff at the National Academies for nearly 25 years, assisting committees focused on a wide variety of subjects, including studies for the Agency for International Development, technology transfer, aeronautics and space research, various kinds of natural disasters, HIV and needle exchange, human factors and engineering, the polygraph, poison control centers, education and testing issues (e.g., “No Child Left Behind”), ethics in research, and social security (i.e., representative payees, disability determinations). She has a BA in French from Miami University in Ohio and an MA in French with a minor in English from Kent State University.


Eileen Santa, MA, is a research associate working with the premature birth and the prisoner research ethics committees. She earned her master’s degree in clinical psychology from the University of Massachusetts, where she is currently a doctoral candidate. Her research focuses on the cultural factors that contribute to healthy outcomes for Latina mothers and children.


Vilija Teel works as the senior project assistant for this study, providing administrative support for the project. Mrs. Teel plans and coordinates logistical arrangements for committee meetings, including coordinating travel and lodging for committee members, overseeing the attendee registration process during open sessions, and providing support throughout the committee meeting. She also provides support for the project’s financial management, including processing payment requests and ensuring timely reimbursement of travel and incidental expenses. Mrs. Teel earned a BA in English/Linguistics from Vilnius University and has taken additional course

Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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work in finance and management areas. She is proficient in all of the major office-environment software programs. In addition to English, she has a good grasp of many other languages.


Jason Farley is currently working as an intern for this study. Mr. Farley is completing a PhD in the School of Nursing at The Johns Hopkins University. He holds a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of Alabama, a master’s degree in public health from the University of Alabama, Birmingham, and a master’s degree in nursing from The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. He is certified as an adult nurse practitioner with a clinical practice both in infectious disease and emergency medicine. His doctoral study was recently funded by a National Research Service Award by the National Institute of Health. His research will investigate the molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the Baltimore City jail system.

Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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Suggested Citation:"E Committee, Expert Advisor, Liaison Panel, and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11692.
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In the past 30 years, the population of prisoners in the United States has expanded almost 5-fold, correctional facilities are increasingly overcrowded, and more of the country's disadvantaged populations—racial minorities, women, people with mental illness, and people with communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C, and tuberculosis—are under correctional supervision.

Because prisoners face restrictions on liberty and autonomy, have limited privacy, and often receive inadequate health care, they require specific protections when involved in research, particularly in today's correctional settings. Given these issues, the Department of Health and Human Services' Office for Human Research Protections commissioned the Institute of Medicine to review the ethical considerations regarding research involving prisoners.

The resulting analysis contained in this book, Ethical Considerations for Research Involving Prisoners, emphasizes five broad actions to provide prisoners involved in research with critically important protections:

• expand the definition of "prisoner";

• ensure universally and consistently applied standards of protection;

• shift from a category-based to a risk-benefit approach to research review;

• update the ethical framework to include collaborative responsibility; and

• enhance systematic oversight of research involving prisoners.

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