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Handbook of Frequency Allocations and Spectrum Protection for Scientific Uses (2007)

Chapter: Appendix B Information on Footnotes to Science Services Allocations

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Information on Footnotes to Science Services Allocations." National Research Council. 2007. Handbook of Frequency Allocations and Spectrum Protection for Scientific Uses. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11719.
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Appendix B
Information on Footnotes to Science Services Allocations

Radio regulations are adopted by adhering Administrations and have treaty status. Footnotes to these regulations often contain critical information that provides protection to particular services on a primary or secondary basis. These footnotes change frequently. For the most current list of footnotes see http://www.fcc.gov/oet/spectrum/table/fcctable.pdf. Box B.1 gives an example of several different types of footnotes to demonstrate the nature of footnotes and their role in spectrum policy.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Information on Footnotes to Science Services Allocations." National Research Council. 2007. Handbook of Frequency Allocations and Spectrum Protection for Scientific Uses. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11719.
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BOX B.1

Sample Footnotes

International Footnotes


Example:

5.372 Harmful interference shall not be caused to stations of the radio astronomy service using the band 1610.6-1613.8 MHz by stations of the radiodetermination-satellite and mobile-satellite services (No. 29.13 applies).


General U.S. Footnotes


Example:

US81 The band 38-38.25 MHz is used by both Government and non-Government radio astronomy observatories. No new fixed or mobile assignments are to be made and Government stations in the band 38-38.25 MHz will be moved to other bands on a case-by-case basis, as required, to protect radio astronomy observations from harmful interference. As an exception however, low powered military transportable and mobile stations used for tactical and training purposes will continue to use the band. To the extent practicable, the latter operations will be adjusted to relieve such interference as may be caused to radio astronomy observations. In the event of harmful interference from such local operations, radio astronomy observatories may contact local military commands directly, with a view to effecting relief. A list of military commands, areas of coordination, and points of contact for purposes of relieving interference may be obtained upon request from the Office of the Chief Scientist, Federal Communications Commission, Washington, D.C. 20554.


Government (U.S.) Footnotes


Example:

G6 Military tactical fixed and mobile operations may be conducted nationally on a secondary basis; (1) to the meteorological aids service in the band 403-406 MHz; and (2) to the radio astronomy service in the band 406.1-410 MHz. Such fixed and mobile operations are subject to local coordination to ensure that harmful interference will not be caused to the services to which the bands are allocated.


Nonfederal Government (U.S.) Footnotes


Example:

NG124 In the Public Safety Radio Service allocation within the bands 30-50 MHz, 150-174 MHz and 450-470 MHz, Police Radio Service licensees are authorized to operate low powered radio transmitters on a secondary non-interference basis in accordance with the provisions of Section 2.803 and 90.19 (f) (5) of the Rules.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Information on Footnotes to Science Services Allocations." National Research Council. 2007. Handbook of Frequency Allocations and Spectrum Protection for Scientific Uses. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11719.
×
Page 96
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Information on Footnotes to Science Services Allocations." National Research Council. 2007. Handbook of Frequency Allocations and Spectrum Protection for Scientific Uses. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11719.
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Page 97
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The electromagnetic spectrum is a vital part of our environment. Information encoded in the spectrum of radiation arriving at earth from the universe is the means by which we learn about its workings and origin. Radiation collected from the Earth's land, oceans, biosphere, and atmosphere provide us with much of the data needed to better understand this environment. Wise use of the spectrum is necessary if we are to continue these advances in scientific understanding. To help guide this effort, the NSF and NASA asked the NRC to develop a set of principles for fostering effective allocation and protection of spectral bands for scientific research. This handbook contains practical information in this connection including a description of regulatory bodies and issues, a discussion of the relevant scientific background, a list of science spectrum allocations in the United States, and an analysis of spectrum protection issues.

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