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Status of Pollinators in North America (2007)

Chapter: B Presentations to the Committee

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Suggested Citation:"B Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
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B
Presentations to the Committee

Keck Center, The National Academies

Washington, DC

July 6, 2005


Perspective of sponsoring agencies

Kevin Hackett, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service

William Walker, U.S. Geological Survey


Comments from the North American Pollinator Protection Campaign: Information sources from NAPPC

Laurie Adams, North American Pollinator Protection Campaign


Workshop on the Status of Pollinators in North America

National Academy of Sciences Building

Washington, DC

October 18–19, 2005


SESSION 1: Direct and Indirect Indication of Pollinator Population Size


Databases on pollinators in North America

Terry Griswold, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service

Suggested Citation:"B Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
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Databases on pollinators in North America—natural history collections

John Ascher, American Museum of Natural History


Databases on pollinators in North America

Sam Droege, U.S. Geological Survey, Patuxent Wildlife Research Center


Databases on pollinators in North America and the Monarch Watch

Orley Taylor, University of Kansas


Databases on pollinators in Mexico

Ma. del Coro Arizmendi, National Autonomous University of Mexico


Long-term bee survey

Robert Minckley, Rochester University


Xerces Society’s red list

Scott Hoffman Black, Xerces Society


SESSION 2: Possible Causes of Pollinator Decline


Effects of climate change on pollinator populations

Jessica Hellmann, University of Notre Dame


Effects of pollinator declines on the ecological genetics of plant populations

Kent Holsinger, University of Connecticut


Demographic and genetic factors as causes of pollinator decline

Laurence Packer, York University, Canada


Impact of landscape ecology, habitat fragmentation, and agricultural intensification on pollinator populations

Nick Haddad, North Carolina State University


Impact of invasive species on pollinator populations and the implications for land and resource management

Diane Larson, U.S. Geological Survey, North Prairie Wildlife Research Center


Factors that influence population sizes in bumble bees and other members of the native bee community

Robbin Thorp, University of California, Davis

Suggested Citation:"B Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
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Causes and consequences on honey bee decline with emphasis on the almond industry

Marla Spivak, University of Minnesota, St. Paul


Causes and consequences on honey bee decline

Joe Traynor, Scientific Ag Co.


SESSION 3: Consequences of Pollinator Decline


Consequences of population decline in nectar-feeding bats

Ted Fleming, University of Miami


Effects of pollinator declines on the ecological genetics of plant populations

Tia-Lynn Ashman, University of Pittsburgh


Environmental Economics of Pollinator Decline

Stephen Polasky, University of Minnesota


Biological and economic factors that impact the overall health of the honey bee industry

Daniel Weaver, B. Weaver Apiaries and the American Bee Keeping Federation


Conservation of biodiversity of pollinators in natural and agro ecosystems

Simon G. Potts, University of Reading


Beckman Center, The National Academies

Irvine, CA

January 14, 2006


The current status of the alfalfa leafcutting bee as a pollinator of alfalfa seed

Ron Bitner, International Pollination Systems


Monitoring schemes and citizen science program for pollinators

Gordon W. Frankie, University of California, Berkeley


Pollination decline: Is it the canary in the mine shaft?

Jerry Hayes, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services


Economics of pollinator services and potential policy implications

Daniel Sumner, University of California, Davis

Suggested Citation:"B Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
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Page 282
Suggested Citation:"B Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
×
Page 283
Suggested Citation:"B Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
×
Page 284
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Pollinators--insects, birds, bats, and other animals that carry pollen from the male to the female parts of flowers for plant reproduction--are an essential part of natural and agricultural ecosystems throughout North America. For example, most fruit, vegetable, and seed crops and some crops that provide fiber, drugs, and fuel depend on animals for pollination.

This report provides evidence for the decline of some pollinator species in North America, including America's most important managed pollinator, the honey bee, as well as some butterflies, bats, and hummingbirds. For most managed and wild pollinator species, however, population trends have not been assessed because populations have not been monitored over time. In addition, for wild species with demonstrated declines, it is often difficult to determine the causes or consequences of their decline. This report outlines priorities for research and monitoring that are needed to improve information on the status of pollinators and establishes a framework for conservation and restoration of pollinator species and communities.

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