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Status of Pollinators in North America (2007)

Chapter: C Recently Extinct Insects from Around the World

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Suggested Citation:"C Recently Extinct Insects from Around the World." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
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C
Recently Extinct Insects from Around the World

Scientific Name

Common Name

Coleoptera

 

Dryophthorus distinguendus

Weevil [unnamed]

Dryotribus mimeticus

Weevil [unnamed]

Karocolens tuberculatus

Weevil [unnamed]

Macrancyclus linearis*

Weevil [unnamed]

Mecodema punctellum

Ground beetle [unnamed] (New Zealand)

Megadytes ducalis

Water beetle [unnamed] (Brazil)

Oedemasylus laysanensis

Weevil [unnamed] (Hawaiian Islands)

Pentarthrum blackburni

Blackburn weevil

Rhantus orbignyi

Water beetle [unnamed] (New Caledonia)

Rhantus papuanus

Water beetle [unnamed] (New Guinea)

Rhyncogonus bryani

Weevil [unnamed]

Siettitia balsetensis

Perrin cave beetle

Trigonoscuta rossi

Fort Ross weevil

Diptera

 

Campsicnemus mirabilis

Longlegged fly [unnamed] (Hawaii)

Drosophila lanaiensis

Vinegar fly [unnamed] (Hawaii)

Stonemyia volutina

Volutine stoneyian tabanid fly

Ephemeroptera

 

Acanthometropus pecatonica

Pecatonica River mayfly

Pentagenia robusta Robust

Burrowing mayfly [unnamed]

Homoptera

 

Clavicoccus erinaceus

Mealy bug [unnamed]

Phyllococcus oahuensis

Aphid [unnamed] Hawaii

Lepidoptera

 

Agrotis crinigera*

Noctuid moth [unnamed]*

Agrotis fasciata*

Midway noctuid moth*

Agrotis kerri*

Kerr’s noctuid moth*

Suggested Citation:"C Recently Extinct Insects from Around the World." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
×

Scientific Name

Common Name

Agrotis photophila*

Noctuid moth [unnamed]*

Agrotis procellaris*

Procellaris grotis noctuid moth*

Argyresthia castaneela*

Chestnut ermine moth*

Coleophora leucochrysella*

Casebearer moth [unnamed]

Deloneura immaculate*

Hairsteak butterfly [unnamed]*

Ectodemia castaneae*

American chestnut moth*

Genophantis leahi*

Looper moth [unnamed]*

Glaucopsyche xerces*

Xerces blue*

Lepidochrysops hypopolia*

Hairsteak butterfly [unnamed] (South Africa)

Levuana irridescens*

Levuana moth*

Libythea cinyras*

Snout butterfly [unnamed] (Mauritius)*

Maculinea alcon arenaria*

Dutch alcon blue*

Oeobia sp.*

Pyralid moth [unnamed]*

Parnassius clodius strohbeeni*

Strohbeen parnassian*

Scotorythra megalophylla*

Kona giant looper moth*

Scotorythra nesiotes*

Ko’olau giant looper moth*

Scotorythra paratactis*

Hawaiian hopseed looper moth*

Speyeria adiaste atossa*

Atossa fritillary*

Tischeria perplexa*

Chestnut clearwing moth*

Odonata

 

Megalagrion jugorum

Jugorum megalagrion damsefly

Orthoptera

 

Sympetrum dilatatum

Dragonfly [unnamed]

Orthoptera

 

Conozoa hyalina

Central Valley grasshopper

Neduba extincta

Antioch Dunes shieldback katydid

Plecoptera

 

Alloperla roberti

Robert’s stonefly

Trichoptera

 

Rhyacophila amabilis

Castle Lake caddisfly

Triaenodes phalacris

Athens caddisfly

Triaenodes tridonata

Three-tooth caddisfly

*Potential pollinator; species is known to visit flowers for nectar or pollen.

SOURCE: Adapted from http://extinctanimals.petermaas.nl/.

Suggested Citation:"C Recently Extinct Insects from Around the World." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
×
Page 285
Suggested Citation:"C Recently Extinct Insects from Around the World." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
×
Page 286
Next: D Endangered Insects in the Continental United States »
Status of Pollinators in North America Get This Book
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Pollinators--insects, birds, bats, and other animals that carry pollen from the male to the female parts of flowers for plant reproduction--are an essential part of natural and agricultural ecosystems throughout North America. For example, most fruit, vegetable, and seed crops and some crops that provide fiber, drugs, and fuel depend on animals for pollination.

This report provides evidence for the decline of some pollinator species in North America, including America's most important managed pollinator, the honey bee, as well as some butterflies, bats, and hummingbirds. For most managed and wild pollinator species, however, population trends have not been assessed because populations have not been monitored over time. In addition, for wild species with demonstrated declines, it is often difficult to determine the causes or consequences of their decline. This report outlines priorities for research and monitoring that are needed to improve information on the status of pollinators and establishes a framework for conservation and restoration of pollinator species and communities.

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