National Academies Press: OpenBook

Status of Pollinators in North America (2007)

Chapter: D Endangered Insects in the Continental United States

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Suggested Citation:"D Endangered Insects in the Continental United States." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
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D
Endangered Insects in the Continental United States

Scientific Name

Common Name

Coleoptera

 

Batrisodes texanus

Coffin cave mold beetle

Batrisodes venyivi

Helotes mold beetle

Brychius hungerfordi

Hungerford crawling water beetle

Cicindela ohlone

Ohlone tiger beetle

Heterelmis comalensis

Comal Springs riffle beetle

Nicrophorus americanus

American burying beetle

Polyphylla barbata

Mount Hermon June beetle

Rhadine exilis

Ground beetle [unnamed]

Rhadine infernalis

Ground beetle [unnamed]

Rhadine persephone

Tooth Cave ground beetle

Stygoparnus comalensis

Comal Springs dryopid beetle

Texamaurops reddelli

Kretschmarr Cave mold beetle

Diptera

 

Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis*

Delhi Sands flower-loving fly*

Lepidoptera

 

Apodemia mormo langei

Lange metalmark butterfly*

Boloria acrocnema*

Uncompahgre fritillary butterfly*

Callophrys mossii bayensis*

San Bruno elfin butterfly*

Euphilotes battoides allyni*

El Segundo blue butterfly*

Euphilotes enoptes smithi*

Smith blue butterfly*

Euphydryas editha quino (=E. e. wrighti)*

Wright’s euphydryas (Quino checkerspot butterfly)*

Glaucopsyche lygdamus palosverdesensis*

Palos Verdes blue butterfly*

Heraclides aristodemus ponceanus*

Schaus swallowtail butterfly*

Icaricia icarioides fenderi*

Fender blue butterfly*

Icaricia icarioides missionensis*

Mission blue butterfly*

Lycaeides argyrognomon lotis*

Lotis blue butterfly*

Suggested Citation:"D Endangered Insects in the Continental United States." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
×

Scientific Name

Common Name

Lycaeides melissa samuelis*

Karner blue butterfly*

Manduca blackburni*

Blackburn sphinx moth*

Neonympha mitchellii francisci*

Saint Francis satyr butterfly*

Neonympha mitchellii mitchellii*

Mitchell satyr butterfly*

Pseudocopaeodes eunus obscurus*

Carson wandering skipper*

Pyrgus ruralis lagunae*

Laguna Mountains skipper*

Speyeria callippe callippe*

Callippe silverspot butterfly*

Speyeria zerene behrensii*

Behren silverspot butterfly*

Speyeria zerene myrtleae*

Myrtle silverspot butterfly*

Odonata

 

Somatochlora hineana

Hine emerald dragonfly

Orthoptera

 

Trimerotropis infantilis

Zayante band-winged grasshopper

*Potential pollinator; species is known to visit flowers for nectar or pollen.

SOURCE: Adapted from http://ecos.fws.gov/tess_public/SpeciesReport.do?kingdom=I&listingType=L.

Suggested Citation:"D Endangered Insects in the Continental United States." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
×
Page 287
Suggested Citation:"D Endangered Insects in the Continental United States." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
×
Page 288
Next: E Bee Species in Decline in North America »
Status of Pollinators in North America Get This Book
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Pollinators--insects, birds, bats, and other animals that carry pollen from the male to the female parts of flowers for plant reproduction--are an essential part of natural and agricultural ecosystems throughout North America. For example, most fruit, vegetable, and seed crops and some crops that provide fiber, drugs, and fuel depend on animals for pollination.

This report provides evidence for the decline of some pollinator species in North America, including America's most important managed pollinator, the honey bee, as well as some butterflies, bats, and hummingbirds. For most managed and wild pollinator species, however, population trends have not been assessed because populations have not been monitored over time. In addition, for wild species with demonstrated declines, it is often difficult to determine the causes or consequences of their decline. This report outlines priorities for research and monitoring that are needed to improve information on the status of pollinators and establishes a framework for conservation and restoration of pollinator species and communities.

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