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Status of Pollinators in North America (2007)

Chapter: F Meetings and Conferences on Pollinator Issues 1979-2006

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Suggested Citation:"F Meetings and Conferences on Pollinator Issues 1979-2006." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
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F
Meetings and Conferences on Pollinator Issues 1979–2006

Event

Sponsor

Location

Date

Publication

Pesticide–Pollinator Interactions

National Research Council Canada

Toronto, Ont.

1979–1980

NRCC, 1981

Alternative Pollinators for Ontario’s Crops

 

Guelph, Ont.

April 12, 1986

Proceedings of theEntomological Society of Ontario, 118 (1988)

National Workshop on Bee and Pollination Research

Agriculture Canada

Winnipeg, Man.

April 4–5, 1989

Agriculture Canada

International Workshop on Non-Apis Bees

U.S. Department of Agriculture

Logan, Utah

Aug. 10–13, 1992

 

Tri-National Forgotten Pollinators Campaign

Arizona–Tucson Desert Museum

Phoenix, Ariz.

1995–1999

Various, including Buchmann and Nabhan, 1996

Conservation of Bees

International Bee Research Association; Linnaean Society

United Kingdom

April 1995

Matheson et al., 1996

Bees and Crop Pollination—Crisis, Crossroads, Conservation

Entomological Society of America

Burlington, Vt.

Feb. 26, 1997

Stubbs and Drummond, 2001

Suggested Citation:"F Meetings and Conferences on Pollinator Issues 1979-2006." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
×

Event

Sponsor

Location

Date

Publication

Pollinators and Mother Earth: Global Perspectives in Productivity, Diversity, and Behavior

Entomological Society of Canada

Edmonton, Alta.

Oct. 4–8, 1997

None

For Non-Native Crops, Whence Pollinators of the Future?

Entomological Society of America

Las Vegas, Nev.

Nov. 8–12, 1998

Strickler and Cane, 2003

Saving America’s Pollinators

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Coevolution Institute, National Zoological Park

Washington, D.C.

June 18, 1998

None

Pollinating Bees: The Conservation Link Between Agriculture and Nature

Brazilian Ministry of Environment

São Paulo, Brazil

Oct. 7–9, 1998

Kevan et al., 2002

Workshop on Declining Pollinators

U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Interior

Logan, Utah

May 27–28, 1999

USGS/BRD/ITR-2000-0007

Causes and Extent of Declines Among Native Invertebrate Pollinators: Detection, Evidence and Consequences

National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis

Santa Barbara, Calif.

October 1999

Conservation Ecology 5 (2001)

North American Pollinator Protection Campaign

Coevolution Institute

Washington, D.C., and area

Annually since 2000

None, but see http://www.nappc.org

International Congress of Entomology

 

Foz Iguazu, Brazil

2000

None

National Conference on Pollination Ecology and Its Contribution to Conservation and Biodiversity

 

Andhra University, India

Feb. 22–24, 2000

Souvenir and abstracts published by Andhra University, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India

FAO International Pollinators Initiative, Plan of Action

United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization

Rome, Italy

Nov. 14–16, 2000

See http://www.fao.org/

Suggested Citation:"F Meetings and Conferences on Pollinator Issues 1979-2006." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
×

Event

Sponsor

Location

Date

Publication

Protecting and Promoting Our Pollinators

Entomological Society of Quebec, Entomological Society of Canada, Entomological Society of America

Montreal, Que.

Dec. 3–6, 2000

None

Managing Biodiversity in Agricultural Ecosystems: Convention on Biological Diversity

 

Montreal, Que.

Nov. 8–10, 2001

See http://www.unu.edu/env/plec/cbd

First Meeting of the African Pollinators Initiative

 

Nairobi, Kenya

Feb. 18–22, 2002

Web site

Pollinators Workshop

 

Mabula, South Africa

June 27–29, 2003

Eardley et al., 2006

São Paulo Declaration on Pollinators + 5 Forum

 

São Paulo, Brazil

Oct. 27–30, 1998

Kevan and Imperatriz-Fonseca, 2002

International Workshop on Solitary Bees and their Role in Pollination

 

Beberibe, Ceará, Brazil

April 26–29, 2004

Freitas and Pereira, 2004

United Nations Convention on Biodiversity, Conference of the Parties, General Meeting 8

 

Curitiba, Brazil

March 2006

Pollinators and Pollination: A Resource Book for Policy and Practice

Suggested Citation:"F Meetings and Conferences on Pollinator Issues 1979-2006." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
×
Page 290
Suggested Citation:"F Meetings and Conferences on Pollinator Issues 1979-2006." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
×
Page 291
Suggested Citation:"F Meetings and Conferences on Pollinator Issues 1979-2006." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
×
Page 292
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Status of Pollinators in North America Get This Book
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Pollinators--insects, birds, bats, and other animals that carry pollen from the male to the female parts of flowers for plant reproduction--are an essential part of natural and agricultural ecosystems throughout North America. For example, most fruit, vegetable, and seed crops and some crops that provide fiber, drugs, and fuel depend on animals for pollination.

This report provides evidence for the decline of some pollinator species in North America, including America's most important managed pollinator, the honey bee, as well as some butterflies, bats, and hummingbirds. For most managed and wild pollinator species, however, population trends have not been assessed because populations have not been monitored over time. In addition, for wild species with demonstrated declines, it is often difficult to determine the causes or consequences of their decline. This report outlines priorities for research and monitoring that are needed to improve information on the status of pollinators and establishes a framework for conservation and restoration of pollinator species and communities.

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