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Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States (2007)

Chapter: Appendix A: Charge to the Committee

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Charge to the Committee." National Research Council. 2007. Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11796.
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Appendixes

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Charge to the Committee." National Research Council. 2007. Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11796.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Charge to the Committee." National Research Council. 2007. Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11796.
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A
Charge to the Committee

Following is the charge to the Rare-Isotope Science Assessment Committee from the National Research Council’s Board on Physics and Astronomy, the Department of Energy, and the National Science Foundation:


The committee will define a scientific agenda for a U.S. domestic rare-isotope facility, taking into account current government plans. In preparing its report, the committee will address the role that such a facility could play in the future of nuclear physics, considering the field broadly, but placing emphasis on its potential scientific impact on nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental symmetries, stockpile stewardship and other national security areas, and future availability of scientific and technical personnel. The need for such a facility will be addressed in the context of international efforts in this area.

In particular, the committee will address the following questions:


  • What science should be addressed by a rare-isotope facility and what is its importance in the overall context of research in nuclear physics and physics in general?

  • What are the capabilities of other facilities, existing and planned, domestic and abroad, to address the science agenda? What scientific role could be played by a domestic rare-isotope facility that is complementary to existing and planned facilities at home and elsewhere?

  • What are the benefits to other fields of science and to society of establishing such a facility in the United States?

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Charge to the Committee." National Research Council. 2007. Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11796.
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Page 111
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Charge to the Committee." National Research Council. 2007. Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11796.
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Page 112
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Charge to the Committee." National Research Council. 2007. Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11796.
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Page 113
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Over ten years ago, U.S. nuclear scientists proposed construction of a new rare isotope accelerator in the United States, which would enable experiments to elucidate the important questions in nuclear physics. To help assess this proposal, DOE and NSF asked the NRC to define the science agenda for a next-generation U.S. Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). As the study began, DOE announced a substantial reduction in the scope of this facility and put off its initial operation date by several years. The study focused on an evaluation of the science that could be accomplished on a facility reduced in scope. This report provides a discussion of the key science drivers for a FRIB, an assessment of existing domestic and international rare isotope beams, an assessment of the current U.S. position about the FRIB, and a set of findings and conclusions about the scientific and policy context for such a facility.

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