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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2007. Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11796.
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B
Meeting Agendas

FIRST MEETING WASHINGTON, D.C. DECEMBER 16-17, 2005

Friday, December 16, 2005


Closed Session


8:00 a.m.

Welcome and Plans for the Meeting

 

—John Ahearne and Stuart Freedman, Co-Chairs

8:15

Committee Balance and Composition Discussion

 

—Donald Shapero, Director, Board on Physics and Astronomy (BPA)

9:15

Introduction to the National Research Council (NRC)

 

—Timothy Meyer, Senior Program Officer, BPA

9:30

General Discussion

9:45

Break

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2007. Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11796.
×

Open Session

10:00 a.m.

Perspectives from the Department of Energy (DOE)/ Nuclear Physics

 

—Dennis Kovar, Associcate Director, DOE Office of Nuclear Physics

10:30

Perspectives from the National Science Foundation (NSF)/Physics

 

—Joseph Dehmer, Director, NSF Division of Physics

11:00

Perspectives from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB)

 

—Joel Parriott, Budget Examiner, OMB

11:30

General Discussion

12:00

noon Lunch

1:00 p.m.

Perspectives from the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP)

 

—Rob Dimeo, Assistant Director, Physical Sciences and Engineering, OSTP

1:30

Nuclear Physics Context of Rare-Isotope Science

 

—James Symons, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Chair, DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Long-Range Planning Report (2002)

2:15

Perspectives from Capitol Hill

 

—Michael Holland, Chairwoman’s Staff, House Science Committee

2:45

General Discussion

3:15

Break

3:30

Public Comments from User Groups

4:30

Public Comments from Major Facilities

5:30

Other Public Comments

6:00

Adjourn

Saturday, December 17, 2005


Open Session

8:30 a.m.

International Context of Rare-Isotope Science

 

—Peter Bond, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Chair, NSAC Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA)/GSI Comparison Report (2004)

9:00

Discussion

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2007. Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11796.
×

Closed Session

9:45 a.m.

Initial Impressions

 

—John Ahearne and Stuart Freedman, Co-Chairs

10:30

Discussion of Work Plan

12:30 p.m.

Lunch

1:30

Adjourn

SECOND MEETING IRVINE, CALIFORNIA FEBRUARY 11-12, 2006

Saturday, February 11, 2006


Closed Session

8:30 a.m.

Welcome and Plans for the Meeting

 

—John Ahearne and Stuart Freedman, Co-Chairs

8:45

Initial Discussions

9:15

Break

Open Session

9:30

Rare-Isotope Science in the Context of Nuclear Physics

 

—Richard Casten, Committee Member

10:00

Discussion

10:30

The Rare-Isotope Accelerator Facility

 

—Jerry Nolen, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

11:00

Discussion

11:45

Lunch

12:45 p.m.

Rare-Isotope Science: Nuclear Structure (Experiment)

 

—Bradley Sherrill, Michigan State University (MSU)

1:15

Rare-Isotope Science: Nuclear Structure (Theory)

 

—Erich Ormand, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

1:45

Discussion

2:15

Rare-Isotope Science: Nuclear Astrophysics

 

—Hendrik Schatz, MSU

2:45

Rare-Isotope Science: Astronomy and Astrophysics

 

—John Cowan, University of Oklahoma (by telephone)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2007. Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11796.
×

3:15 p.m.

Discussion

3:45

Break

4:00

Rare-Isotope Science: Stockpile Stewardship

 

—David Crandall, DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

4:30

Discussion

5:00

Rare-Isotope Science: Fundamental Symmetries

 

—Guy Savard, ANL

5:30

Discussion

6:30

Adjourn

Sunday, February 12, 2006


Open Session

8:45 a.m.

Rare-Isotope Science and Technology: Additional Applications

 

—Larry Ahle, LLNL

9:15

Discussion

9:45

Guidance for Implementing NSAC Long-Range Plan

 

—Robert Tribble, Texas A&M University, and Chair, Report of the NSAC Subcommittee (2005)

10:15

Discussion

10:45

Break

11:00

Perspective on RIA and Nuclear Physics

 

—John Schiffer, ANL, and Chair, 1999 NRC Survey

11:30

General Discussion

12:00

noon Lunch

Closed Session

1:00 p.m.

Committee Deliberations

4:30

Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2007. Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11796.
×

THIRD MEETING WASHINGTON, D.C. MARCH 12-13, 2006

Sunday, March 12, 2006


Closed Session

8:30 a.m.

Welcome and Plans for the Meeting

 

—John Ahearne and Stuart Freedman, Co-Chairs

8:45

Initial Discussions

9:15

Break

Open Session

9:30

New Developments in Planning for RIA

 

—Dennis Kovar, DOE, and Joel Parriott, OMB

10:30

Two Views on “The Elements of RIA: Options for Staging or Descoping”

10:30

The View from Michigan State University

 

—Konrad Gelbke, MSU

11:00

The View from Argonne National Laboratory

 

—Donald Geesaman, ANL

11:30

Discussion

12:00

noon Lunch

1:00 p.m.

The Role of Nuclear Structure in the Science Case for RIA

 

—Francesco Iachello, Yale University

Closed Session

2:00

Discussion

6:30

Adjourn

Monday, March 13, 2006


Closed Session

8:30 a.m.

General Discussions

10:00

Break

10:30

General Discussions

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2007. Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11796.
×

11:45 a.m.

Lunch

1:00 p.m.

Adjourn

FOURTH MEETING VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA JULY 14-15, 2006

Friday, July 14, 2006


Closed Session

9:00 a.m.

General Discussion

Open Session

11:00

Perspectives from TRIUMF

 

—Jean-Michel Poutissou, Associate Director, TRIUMF

12:00

noon Lunch

Closed Session

1:00 p.m.

General Discussions

6:00

Adjourn

Saturday, July 15, 2006


Closed Session

9:00 a.m.

General Discussions

Open Session

12:00 noon

Lunch

1:00 p.m.

Tour of TRIUMF

2:00

Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2007. Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11796.
×
Page 114
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2007. Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11796.
×
Page 115
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2007. Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11796.
×
Page 116
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2007. Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11796.
×
Page 117
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2007. Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11796.
×
Page 118
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2007. Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11796.
×
Page 119
Next: Appendix C: Selected List of Operating and Planned Rare-Isotope Facilities Worldwide »
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Over ten years ago, U.S. nuclear scientists proposed construction of a new rare isotope accelerator in the United States, which would enable experiments to elucidate the important questions in nuclear physics. To help assess this proposal, DOE and NSF asked the NRC to define the science agenda for a next-generation U.S. Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). As the study began, DOE announced a substantial reduction in the scope of this facility and put off its initial operation date by several years. The study focused on an evaluation of the science that could be accomplished on a facility reduced in scope. This report provides a discussion of the key science drivers for a FRIB, an assessment of existing domestic and international rare isotope beams, an assessment of the current U.S. position about the FRIB, and a set of findings and conclusions about the scientific and policy context for such a facility.

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