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Suggested Citation:"Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2007. Assessment of the Performance of Engineered Waste Containment Barriers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11930.
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Acronyms and Abbreviations

ACC asphalt cement concrete

ADRE advective-dispersive-reactive equation

CCL compacted clay liner

CERCLA Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act

CIWMB California Integrated Waste Management Board

CQA construction quality assurance

DOE Department of Energy

EPA Environmental Protection Agency

GCL geosynthetic clay liner

GM geomembrane

HDPE high-density polyethylene

HELP Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance

MSW municipal solid waste

MULTIMED Multimedia Exposure Assessment Model

NYDEC New York Department of Environmental Conservation

PCC Portland cement concrete

RCRA Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

RMD ratio of monovalent-to-divalent cations

UMTRA Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action

Suggested Citation:"Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2007. Assessment of the Performance of Engineered Waste Containment Barriers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11930.
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Suggested Citation:"Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2007. Assessment of the Performance of Engineered Waste Containment Barriers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11930.
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Page 121
Suggested Citation:"Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2007. Assessment of the Performance of Engineered Waste Containment Barriers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11930.
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Page 122
Assessment of the Performance of Engineered Waste Containment Barriers Get This Book
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President Carter's 1980 declaration of a state of emergency at Love Canal, New York, recognized that residents' health had been affected by nearby chemical waste sites. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, enacted in 1976, ushered in a new era of waste management disposal designed to protect the public from harm. It required that modern waste containment systems use "engineered" barriers designed to isolate hazardous and toxic wastes and prevent them from seeping into the environment. These containment systems are now employed at thousands of waste sites around the United States, and their effectiveness must be continually monitored.

Assessment of the Performance of Engineered Waste Containment Barriers assesses the performance of waste containment barriers to date. Existing data suggest that waste containment systems with liners and covers, when constructed and maintained in accordance with current regulations, are performing well thus far. However, they have not been in existence long enough to assess long-term (postclosure) performance, which may extend for hundreds of years. The book makes recommendations on how to improve future assessments and increase confidence in predictions of barrier system performance which will be of interest to policy makers, environmental interest groups, industrial waste producers, and industrial waste management industry.

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