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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Vector-Borne Diseases: Understanding the Environmental, Human Health, and Ecological Connections: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11950.
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Page 297
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Vector-Borne Diseases: Understanding the Environmental, Human Health, and Ecological Connections: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11950.
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Page 298
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Vector-Borne Diseases: Understanding the Environmental, Human Health, and Ecological Connections: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11950.
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Page 299
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Vector-Borne Diseases: Understanding the Environmental, Human Health, and Ecological Connections: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11950.
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Page 300

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Appendix A Agenda Vector-Borne Diseases: Understanding the Environmental, Human Health, and Ecological Connections Hilton Hotel 425 W. Prospect Road Ft. Collins, Colorado June 19-20, 2007 Tuesday, June 19, 2007 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks • Stanley M. Lemon, M.D., Chair Forum on Microbial Threats • Lyle Petersen, M.D., M.P.H. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 9:15 – 10:15 a.m. Keynote Address Duane Gubler, Sc.D. University of Hawaii 10:15 – 10:45 a.m. Discussion 10:45 – 11:00 a.m. Break 297

298 VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES Session I: The Importance of Vector-Borne Diseases Moderator: Lonnie King, D.V.M., Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 11:00 – 11:30 a.m. What are the common denominators in vector-borne disease outbreaks? Ned Hayes, M.D. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 11:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.  mergence of epidemic dengue and dengue E hemorrhagic fever in Mexico: Lessons learned and toward better vector and disease control Barry Beaty, Ph.D. Colorado State University 12:00 – 12:30 p.m. What are the unique issues and challenges associated with vector-borne diseases? Thomas W. Scott, Ph.D. University of California, Davis 12:30 – 1:00 p.m. Discussion of Session I 1:00 – 1:45 p.m. Lunch/Continuing discussion of Session I Session II: Factors of Emergence: The Biology and Ecology of Vector-Borne Diseases Moderator: Col. George Korch, Ph.D., U.S. Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases 1:45 – 2:15 p.m. Ecology of disease: The intersection of human and animal health Ken Linthicum, Ph.D. USDA, Agricultural Research Service 2:15 – 2:45 p.m. What role(s) do anthropogenic factors play in the biology and ecology of vector-borne disease? Durland Fish, Ph.D. Yale University

APPENDIX A 299 2:45 – 3:00 p.m. Break 3:00 – 3:30 p.m. The effects of anthropogenic environmental change and emerging diseases Jonathan A. Patz, M.D., M.P.H. University of Wisconsin, Madison 3:30 – 4:00 p.m. Vector-borne plant diseases: Factors driving the emergence and spread of pathogens Rodrigo Almeida, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley 4:00 – 4:30 p.m. Discussion of Session II 4:30 – 5:00 p.m. Open Discussion of Day 1 6:00 p.m. Meeting adjourns Wednesday, June 20, 2007 8:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast 8:30 – 8:45 a.m. Summary of Day 1 P. Frederick Sparling, M.D., Vice Chair Forum on Microbial Threats Session III: Detection and Control of Vector-Borne Diseases Moderator: Stanley M. Lemon, Chair, Forum on Microbial Threats 8:45 – 9:15 a.m. West Nile virus Lyle Petersen, M.D., M.P.H. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 9:15 – 9:45 a.m. Rift Valley fever C. J. Peters, M.D. University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston 9:45 – 10:15 a.m. Malaria Michael Coleman, Ph.D. Medical Reseach Council, South Africa

300 VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES 10:15 – 10:30 a.m. Break 10:30 – 11:00 a.m. Sudden Oak death David Rizzo, Ph.D. University of California, Davis 11:00 – 11:30 a.m. Vector-borne zoonotic diseases and their ecological and economic implications: Bluetongue disease in Europe Bennie Osburn, Ph.D., D.V.M. University of California, Davis 11:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.  Environmental factors influence transmission of Sin Nombre hantavirus between rodents (and to humans?) Charlie Calisher, Ph.D. Colorado State University 12:00 – 12:30 p.m. Open discussion of Session III 12:30 – 1:15 p.m. Lunch/Continued discussion of Session III Session IV: Integration of Strategies: Surveillance, Diagnosis, and Response Moderator: Carole Heilman, Ph.D., National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health (NIAID/NIH) 1:15 – 5:00 p.m. Panelists •  oger Nasci, Ph.D., Centers for Disease Control R and Prevention • Adriana Costero, Ph.D., NIAID/NIH • David Morens, M.D., NIAID •  herrilyn Wainwright, D.V.M., M.P.H., U.S. S Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 5:00 p.m. Wrap-up and concluding remarks 5:15 p.m. Adjourn

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Vector-borne infectious diseases, such as malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, and plague, cause a significant fraction of the global infectious disease burden; indeed, nearly half of the world's population is infected with at least one type of vector-borne pathogen (CIESIN, 2007; WHO, 2004a). Vector-borne plant and animal diseases, including several newly recognized pathogens, reduce agricultural productivity and disrupt ecosystems throughout the world. These diseases profoundly restrict socioeconomic status and development in countries with the highest rates of infection, many of which are located in the tropics and subtropics.

Although this workshop summary provides an account of the individual presentations, it also reflects an important aspect of the Forum philosophy. The workshop functions as a dialogue among representatives from different sectors and allows them to present their beliefs about which areas may merit further attention. These proceedings summarize only the statements of participants in the workshop and are not intended to be an exhaustive exploration of the subject matter or a representation of consensus evaluation. Vector-Borne Diseases : Understanding the Environmental, Human Health, and Ecological Connections, Workshop Summary (Forum on Microbial Threats) summarizes this workshop.
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