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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2007. The Biological Threat Reduction Program of the Department of Defense: From Foreign Assistance to Sustainable Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12005.
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Appendix A
National Research Council Committee on Prevention of Proliferation of Biological Weapons

Dr. David R. Franz, Chair


David R. Franz is vice president of the Chemical and Biological Defense Division of the Midwest Research Institute. He served in the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command for 23 of his 27 years on active military duty. Dr. Franz has served as both deputy commander and then commander of the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) and as deputy commander of the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. Prior to joining the Command, he served as group veterinarian for the 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne). Dr. Franz served as chief inspector on three United Nations Special Commission biological warfare inspection missions to Iraq, and as technical advisor on long-term monitoring. He served as a member of the first two US/UK teams that visited Russia in support of the Trilateral Joint Statement on Biological Weapons and as a member of the Trilateral Experts Committee for biological weapons negotiations. He also serves as chair of the NRC Committee to Review Proposals from Former Soviet Biological Weapons Institutes, co-chair of the NRC Committee on Protecting Occupants of DOD Buildings from Chemical or Biological Release, and a member of the Committee on International Security and Arms Control of the National Academies.


Dr. Gail H. Cassell


Gail H. Cassell is currently vice president for scientific affairs and Distinguished Lilly Research Scholar for Infectious Diseases, Eli Lilly and Company in Indianapolis. She is the former Charles H. McCauley Professor and chairman of the Department of Microbiology at the University of Alabama School of Medicine and Dentistry at Birmingham. She obtained her B.S. from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and was selected as its 2003 Distinguished Alumnus.


She is a past president of the American Society for Microbiology. She was a member of the National Institutes of Health Director’s Advisory Committee and a member of the Advisory Council of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. She was named to the original Board of Scientific Councilors of the Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and served as chair of the board. She recently served a three-year term on the Advisory Board of the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and is a member of the Secretary of Health and Human Services Advisory Council on Public Health Preparedness. Currently she is a member of the Science Board of the Food and Drug Administration. Since 1996 she has been a member of the U.S.-Japan Cooperative Medical Science Program responsible for advising the respective governments on joint research agendas. She has served on several editorial boards of scientific journals and has authored over 250

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2007. The Biological Threat Reduction Program of the Department of Defense: From Foreign Assistance to Sustainable Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12005.
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articles and book chapters. Dr. Cassell has received national and international awards and an honorary degree for her research in infectious diseases. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies and is currently serving on the IOM Council.


Dr. Cassell has been intimately involved in establishment of science policy and legislation related to biomedical research and public health. For nine years she was chairman of the Public and Scientific Affairs Board of the American Society for Microbiology, has served as an advisor on infectious diseases and indirect costs of research to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and has been an invited participant in numerous Congressional hearings and briefings related to infectious diseases, anti-microbial resistance, and biomedical research. She has served two terms on the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, the accrediting body for U.S. medical schools. She has just completed a term on the Leadership Council of the School of Public Health of Harvard University. Currently she is a member of the Executive Committee of the Board of Visitors of Columbia University School of Medicine and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, the Executive Committee of the Board of Research!America, and the Advisory Council of the School of Nursing of Johns Hopkins University.


Dr. Timothy Endy


Timothy Endy, associate professor of medicine at the State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, received his master's degree in public health from the University of Michigan in 1982 and his MD in 1986 from the Uniformed Services University. He performed his internship and residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in infectious diseases at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center from 1986-1995, subsequently serving as a specialist in virology and emerging diseases in the United States Army Military Component in Bangkok, Thailand, from 1996-2001. Upon his return to the United States, Dr. Endy served in the Department of Virology at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases. From July 2003 until his retirement at the rank of colonel in 2006, Dr. Endy served as the director of the Division of Communicable Diseases and Immunology of the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. He has published extensively on the topic of infectious disease.


Dr. James W. LeDuc


James W. LeDuc is director of the Program on Global Health, Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston. Prior to assuming this post in November 2006, Dr. LeDuc was director of the Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where he coordinated research activities, prevention initiatives, and outbreak investigations for pathogens that cause viral hemorrhagic fevers, influenza and other respiratory infections, childhood viral diseases, and newly emerging diseases such as SARS. He served as the associate director for global health from 1996 to 2000 in the Office of the Director, National Center for Infectious Diseases, and was a medical officer in charge of arboviruses and viral hemorrhagic fevers at the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland, from 1992 to 1996. He also held leadership positions during a 23-year career as a

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2007. The Biological Threat Reduction Program of the Department of Defense: From Foreign Assistance to Sustainable Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12005.
×

U.S. Army officer in the Medical Research and Materiel Command, with assignments in Brazil, Panama, and in the United States, including the Walter Reed Army Medical Center and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases. He is a fellow of the American College of Epidemiology and has received numerous awards for his work in epidemiology. Dr. LeDuc currently serves on the NRC Committee to Review Proposals from Former Soviet Biological Weapons Institutes and has been a member of three previous NRC committees.


Dr. Russ Zajtchuk


Russ Zajtchuk, a national expert in telemedicine, is currently president of Chicago Hospitals International. For more than 27 years, Dr. Zajtchuk served in various positions in the U.S. Army, most recently as commanding general of the Army Medical Research and Materiel Command at Fort Detrick, MD, where he led development of a sophisticated telecommunications infrastructure to speed diagnostics, lab analyses, and consulting expertise worldwide. Zajtchuk is a cardiovascular surgeon who was professor and chairman of the division of cardiothoracic surgery at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. He also served as assistant surgeon general for research and development for the Department of the Army, and as chief operating officer for the Department of Defense telemedicine test-bed. Dr. Zajtchuk currently serves on the NRC Committee to Review Proposals from Former Soviet Biological Weapons Institutes and the NRC Committee on Counterterrorism Challenges for Russia and the United States and previously served on the NRC Committee on Future Contributions of the Biosciences to Public Health, Agriculture, Basic Research, Counter-terrorism, and Non-Proliferation Activities in Russia.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2007. The Biological Threat Reduction Program of the Department of Defense: From Foreign Assistance to Sustainable Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12005.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2007. The Biological Threat Reduction Program of the Department of Defense: From Foreign Assistance to Sustainable Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12005.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2007. The Biological Threat Reduction Program of the Department of Defense: From Foreign Assistance to Sustainable Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12005.
×
Page 86
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2007. The Biological Threat Reduction Program of the Department of Defense: From Foreign Assistance to Sustainable Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12005.
×
Page 87
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2007. The Biological Threat Reduction Program of the Department of Defense: From Foreign Assistance to Sustainable Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12005.
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