National Academies Press: OpenBook

Maritime Security Partnerships (2008)

Chapter: Appendix F: International Databases as Potential Sources of Shared Information

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: International Databases as Potential Sources of Shared Information." National Research Council. 2008. Maritime Security Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12029.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: International Databases as Potential Sources of Shared Information." National Research Council. 2008. Maritime Security Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12029.
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Page 215
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: International Databases as Potential Sources of Shared Information." National Research Council. 2008. Maritime Security Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12029.
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Page 216
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: International Databases as Potential Sources of Shared Information." National Research Council. 2008. Maritime Security Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12029.
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F International Databases as Potential Sources of Shared Information Global Integrated Shipping Information System (GISIS) • Status: Operational • Administration: IMO, Web-based data system • Nature of information: Maritime security-related. To permit verification of compliance with the maritime security provisions of SOLAS Chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code • Scope of operation: Covers all states parties to SOLAS • Legal basis: Communication of information is legally required pursuant to SOLAS Regulation XI-2/13 Port State Information Exchanges Equasis • Status: Operational • Administration: Multilateral, public Web-based data system • Nature of information: Primarily safety-related, port-state-relevant infor- mation provided by the following: —States parties to the Paris and Tokyo Memorandum of Understanding on Port State Control and the USCG —Classification societies —P&I Clubs —Lloyd’s of London —International Association of Independent Tanker Owners —IMO 214

APPENDIX F 215 —European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) —International Transport Forum —Oil Companies International Marine Forum • Scope of operation: Participation by the maritime administrations of Australia, France, Japan, Norway, Spain, the United Kingdom, and EMSA as full partners; IMO and USCG as observers • Legal basis: (new) Memorandum of Understanding of 2007 (port state information itself is being gathered on the basis of various provisions of UNCLOS and other maritime conventions, such as SOLAS, ILO Convention No. 147, and the STCW Convention) European Communities: SafeSeaNet • Status: Operational • Administration: Internet-based data exchange platform between the mari- time administrations of EC member states • Nature of information: Primarily safety- and pollution-prevention-related information on vessels in Europeans waters • Scope of operation: All EC states participate, as well as some non-EC states such as Norway • Legal basis: EC Directive 2002/59/EC Information on Fishing Vessels High Seas Vessels Authorization Record (HSVAR) • Status: Operational • Administration: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations • Nature of information: Data on individual vessels authorized to fish on the high seas as means to counter illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing • Scope of operation: Global, applies to all fishing vessels on the high seas • Legal basis: Article VI of the 1993 Agreement to Promote Compliance with International Conservation and Management Measures by Fishing Vessels on the High Seas (not yet in force)   Covers ships of 300 GT and upward, unless stated otherwise; fishing vessels, traditional ships, and recreational crafts with a length of 45 meters or more; ships with bunkers of 5,000 tons or more; and any ship, irrespective of size, carrying dangerous or polluting goods.

216 MARITIME SECURITY PARTNERSHIPS International Network for Cooperation and Coordination of Fisheries- Related Monitoring, Control and Surveillance Activities (MCS) • Status: Operational • Administration: Loose network of governmental MCS organizations and others, currently based at NOAA • Nature of information: Serves to improve information collection and exchange among national organizations and institutions responsible for fisheries- related MCS • Scope of operation: Potentially global; to date 40 countries and the Euro- pean Commission are represented • Legal basis: Voluntary arrangement Information on Container Security Central Automated (Cargo/Customs) Information System • Status: Not yet operational; part of the administrative arrangements under the International Convention on Mutual Administrative Assistance in Customs Matters, 2003 (not yet in force) • Administration: WCO Council • Nature of information: Customs-relevant information, including “any other information that may be relevant . . . for ensuring the security of the inter- national trade supply chain” (Art. 30, 27) • Scope of operation: Dependent on the scope of country’s participation in the Convention • Legal basis: International Convention on Mutual Administrative Assis- tance in Customs Matters, 2003, Arts. 27-41 Other There exist other regional maritime information exchange systems that directly bear on maritime security. Mention will be made here of only one—the SOUTHCOM Information Exchange System, based on the DoS Cooperating Nations Information Exchange System, which includes the following: • The Caribbean Information Sharing Network (CISN) program assists mil- itaries and law enforcement agencies within the Caribbean basin in establishing a community of interest information-sharing network that will enhance bilateral   Allthe following details are taken directly from <http://68.166.42.251/southcom/Conferences AndWorkshops/Bahamas23-27Jun,2003/Presentations/C_-_Caribbean_Information_Sharing_ Network_(CISN).pdf=>. Accessed on June 25, 2007.

APPENDIX F 217 and multilateral cooperation in combating transnational threats and addressing issues of common concern. • The South American Information Sharing Network (SURNET) provides a community of interest or a regional sensitive-but-unclassified (SBU) protected- information-sharing capability that permits a collaborative approach for address- ing transnational threats and other issues of common interest to the South Ameri- can Military Joint Staff Intelligence Directors. • REDICA (Central American Network), also known as CENTAM Net, is a community-of-interest initiative to share SBU information in a protected environment among nations in Central America to enhance communication and increase regional cooperation for the purpose of combating common threats and addressing issues of common concern.

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To offer security in the maritime domain, governments around the world need the capabilities to directly confront common threats like piracy, drug-trafficking, and illegal immigration. No single navy or nation can do this alone.

Recognizing this new international security landscape, the former Chief of Naval Operations called for a collaborative international approach to maritime security, initially branded the "1,000-ship Navy." This concept envisions U.S. naval forces partnering with multinational, federal, state, local and private sector entities to ensure freedom of navigation, the flow of commerce, and the protection of ocean resources.

This new book from the National Research Council examines the technical and operational implications of the "1,000-ship Navy," as they apply to four levels of cooperative efforts:

  1. U.S. Navy, Coast Guard, and merchant shipping only;
  2. U.S. naval and maritime assets with others in treaty alliances or analogous arrangements;
  3. U.S. naval and maritime assets with ad hoc coalitions; and
  4. U.S. naval and maritime assets with others than above who may now be friendly but could potentially be hostile, for special purposes such as deterrence of piracy or other criminal activity.
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