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U.S. Conventional Prompt Global Strike: Issues for 2008 and Beyond (2008)

Chapter: Appendix F: Summary of Committee Meeting Agendas

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Summary of Committee Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2008. U.S. Conventional Prompt Global Strike: Issues for 2008 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12061.
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Page 204
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Summary of Committee Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2008. U.S. Conventional Prompt Global Strike: Issues for 2008 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12061.
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Page 205

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F Summary of Committee Meeting Agendas The Committee on Conventional Prompt Global Strike Capability first con- vened in February 2007 and held additional meetings and site visits over a period of 8 months, as summarized below: • February 22-23, 2007, in Washington, D.C. First full committee meeting: Briefings on policy, requirements, supporting enablers, and technology plans for conventional prompt global strike from the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy; U.S. Strategic Command; Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics; U.S. Navy Strategic Systems Programs; U.S. Air Force Space Command; and Defense Intelligence Agency. • March 15, 2007, in Washington, D.C. First subcommittee meeting (a makeup of the first full committee meeting for members not in attendance): Briefings on policy, requirements, supporting enablers, and technology plans for conventional prompt global strike from the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy; U.S. Strategic Command; Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics; U.S. Navy Strategic Systems Programs; and U.S. Air Force Space Command. • March 16, 2007, in Washington, D.C. Second subcommittee meeting: Briefings on intelligence capabilities for conventional prompt global strike from the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy and U.S. Strategic Command. • March 22-23, 2007, in Washington, D.C. Second full committee meet- ing: Briefings on short-, mid-, and long-term options for conventional prompt global strike, as well as policy and technical concerns associated with each, from congressional staff, U.S. Senate Defense Appropriations Subcommittee; Congres- 204

APPENDIX F 205 sional Research Service; U.S. Strategic Command; U.S. Air Force Space Com- mand; U.S. Navy Strategic Systems Programs; Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy; and U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Technical Center. In addition, Dr. Pavel Podvig, Center for International Security and Cooperation, Stanford University; Dr. Theodore Postol, Security Studies Program, Massachu- setts Institute of Technology; and Dr. Jeffrey Lewis, New America Foundation, provided in a data-gathering session open to the public their views on international security, arms control, and technical issues related to conventional prompt global strike. • May 10-11, 2007, in Washington, D.C. Third full committee meeting: Briefings on deterrence aspects, treaty implications, policy and operational per- spectives, and geospatial intelligence from the Department of Defense, Depart- ment of State, and National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. • June 12-13, 2007, in San Diego, California. Fourth full committee meet- ing: Briefings on requirements and doctrine, military unity, and submarine opera- tions from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Department of Defense, U.S. Strategic Command, and U.S. Pacific Fleet. • July 14-15, 2007, in San Diego, California. Fifth full committee meeting: Briefings on the Conventional Trident Modification and weapon-on-target effec- tiveness from the U.S. Strategic Command, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Sandia National Laboratories, and Office of the Sec- retary of Defense. • August 9-10, 2007, in Washington, D.C. Sixth full committee meeting: Briefings from the Department of Defense on scenarios for conventional prompt global strike and briefings from industry (Alliant Techsystems, Boeing Company, Lockheed Martin Corporation, Northrop Grumman Mission Systems, and Ray- theon Corporation) on potential conventional prompt global strike alternatives. • September 17-21, 2007, in Irvine, California. Seventh full committee meeting: Committee deliberations and report drafting.

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Conventional prompt global strike (CPGS) is a military option under consideration by the U.S. Department of Defense. This book, the final report from the National Research Council's Committee on Conventional Prompt Global Strike Capability, analyzes proposed CPGS systems and evaluates the potential role CPGS could play in U.S. defense.

U.S. Conventional Prompt Global Strike provides near-, mid-, and long-term recommendations for possible CPGS development, addressing the following questions:

  1. Does the United States need CPGS capabilities?
  2. What are the alternative CPGS systems, and how effective are they likely to be if proposed capabilities are achieved?
  3. What would be the implications of alternative CPGS systems for stability, doctrine, decision making, and operations?
  4. What nuclear ambiguity concerns arise from CPGS, and how might they be mitigated?
  5. What arms control issues arise with CPGS systems, and how might they be resolved?
  6. Should the United States proceed with research, development, testing, and evaluation (RDT&E) of the Conventional Trident Modification (CTM) program5 and, ultimately, with CTM production and deployment?
  7. Should the United States proceed with the development and testing of alternative CPGS systems beyond CTM?
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