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Science Professionals: Master's Education for a Competitive World (2008)

Chapter: Appendix D: America COMPETES Act , Section 7034: Provisions for Professional Science Master's Program

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: America COMPETES Act , Section 7034: Provisions for Professional Science Master's Program." National Research Council. 2008. Science Professionals: Master's Education for a Competitive World. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12064.
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Page 91
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: America COMPETES Act , Section 7034: Provisions for Professional Science Master's Program." National Research Council. 2008. Science Professionals: Master's Education for a Competitive World. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12064.
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Page 92
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: America COMPETES Act , Section 7034: Provisions for Professional Science Master's Program." National Research Council. 2008. Science Professionals: Master's Education for a Competitive World. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12064.
×
Page 93
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: America COMPETES Act , Section 7034: Provisions for Professional Science Master's Program." National Research Council. 2008. Science Professionals: Master's Education for a Competitive World. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12064.
×
Page 94

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Appendix D America COMPETES Act, Section 7034: Provisions for Professional Science Master’s Program SEC. 7034. PROFESSIONAL SCIENCE MASTER’S DEGREE PROGRAMS. (a) CLEARINGHOUSE.— (  1) DEVELOPMENT.—The Director shall establish a clearinghouse, in collaboration with 4-year institutions of higher education (including applicable graduate schools and academic departments), and indus- tries and Federal agencies that employ science-trained personnel, to share program elements used in successful professional science mas- ter’s degree programs and other advanced degree programs related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. (  2) AVAILABILITY.—The Director shall make the clearinghouse of program elements developed under paragraph (1) available to insti- tutions of higher education that are developing professional science master’s degree programs. (b) PROGRAMS.— (  1) PROGRAMS AUTHORIZED.—The Director shall award grants to 4-year institutions of higher education to facilitate the institutions’ creation or improvement of professional science master’s degree pro- grams that may include linkages between institutions of higher edu-   America Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science Act, Public Law No. 110-69. 91

92 SCIENCE PROFESSIONALS cation and industries that employ science-trained personnel, with an emphasis on practical training and preparation for the workforce in high-need fields. (  2) APPLICATION.—A 4-year institution of higher education desiring a grant under this section shall submit an application to the Director at such time, in such manner, and accompanied by such information as the Director may require. The application shall include— (  A) a description of the professional science master’s degree pro- gram that the institution of higher education will implement; (  B) a description of how the professional science master’s degree program at the institution of higher education will produce indi- viduals for the workforce in high-need fields; (  C) the amount of funding from non-Federal sources, including from private industries, that the institution of higher education shall use to support the professional science master’s degree pro- gram; and (  D) an assurance that the institution of higher education shall encourage students in the professional science master’s degree pro- gram to apply for all forms of Federal assistance available to such students, including applicable graduate fellowships and student financial assistance under titles IV and VII of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1070 et seq., 1133 et seq.). (  3) PREFERENCES.—The Director shall give preference in making awards to 4-year institutions of higher education seeking Federal funding to create or improve professional science master’s degree programs, to those applicants— (  A) located in States with low percentages of citizens with graduate or professional degrees, as determined by the Bureau of the Cen- sus, that demonstrate success in meeting the unique needs of the corporate, non-profit, and government communities in the State, as evidenced by providing internships for professional science master’s degree students or similar partnership arrangements; or (B) that secure more than two-thirds of the funding for such profes- sional science master’s degree programs from sources other than the Federal Government. (4) NUMBER OF GRANTS; TIME PERIOD OF GRANTS.— (  A) NUMBER OF GRANTS.—Subject to the availability of appro- priated funds, the Director shall award grants under paragraph (1) to a maximum of 200 4-year institutions of higher education.

APPENDIX D 93 (  B) TIME PERIOD OF GRANTS.—Grants awarded under this sec- tion shall be for one 3-year term. Grants may be renewed only once for a maximum of 2 additional years. (5) EVALUATION AND REPORTS.— (  A) DEVELOPMENT OF PERFORMANCE BENCHMARKS.— Prior to the start of the grant program, the Director, in collabora- tion with 4-year institutions of higher education (including appli- cable graduate schools and academic departments), and industries and Federal agencies that employ science-trained personnel, shall develop performance benchmarks to evaluate the pilot programs assisted by grants under this section. (  B) EVALUATION.—For each year of the grant period, the Director, in consultation with 4-year institutions of higher education (includ- ing applicable graduate schools and academic departments), and industries and Federal agencies that employ science-trained per- sonnel, shall complete an evaluation of each program assisted by grants under this section. Any program that fails to satisfy the performance benchmarks developed under subparagraph (A) shall not be eligible for further funding. (  C) REPORT.—Not later than 180 days after the completion of an evaluation described in subparagraph (B), the Director shall submit a report to Congress that includes— (  i) the results of the evaluation; and (ii) recommendations for administrative and legislative action that could optimize the effectiveness of the pilot programs, as the Director determines to be appropriate.

Next: Appendix E: Estimating the Path of Master's Degree Recipients in the Biological Sciences »
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What are employer needs for staff trained in the natural sciences at the master's degree level? How do master's level professionals in the natural sciences contribute in the workplace? How do master's programs meet or support educational and career goals?

Science Professionals: Master's Education for a Competitive World examines the answers to these and other questions regarding the role of master's education in the natural sciences. The book also focuses on student characteristics and what can be learned from efforts underway to enhance the master's in the natural sciences, particularly as a professional degree.

This book is a critical tool for Congress, the federal agencies charged with carrying out the America COMPETES Act, and educational and science policy makers at the state level. Additionally, anyone with a stake in the development of professional science education (four year institutions of higher education, students, faculty, and employers) will find this book useful.

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