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Suggested Citation:"A References." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Research Priorities in Emergency Preparedness and Response for Public Health Systems: A Letter Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12136.
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Page 29
Suggested Citation:"A References." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Research Priorities in Emergency Preparedness and Response for Public Health Systems: A Letter Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12136.
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Page 30

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A References Burkle, F. M., Jr. 2007. Public health emergencies, cancer, and the legacy of Katrina. Prehosp Disaster Med 22(4):291–292. CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). 2006. Advancing the na- tion’s health: A guide to public health research needs, 2006–2015. Wash- ington, DC: CDC, http://www.cdc.gov/od/science/PHResearch/cdcra/Ad- vancingTheNationsHealth.pdf (accessed December 4, 2007). CDC. 2007. Centers for Public Health Preparedness (CPHP) program. The centers, http://www.bt.cdc.gov/training/cphp/centers.asp (accessed Decem- ber 12, 2007). Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public Health Practice. 2000. Meeting minutes. Wednesday, October 5, 2000, http://www.phf.org/Link/ min102500.pdf (accessed December 23, 2007). DHS (Department of Homeland Security). 2007. DHS National Response Plan, http://www.dhs.gov/xprepresp/committees/editorial_0566.shtm. IOM (Institute of Medicine). 1998. The future of public health. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. IOM. 2001. Crossing the quality chasm: A new health system for the 21st cen- tury. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. IOM. 2002. The future of the public’s health in the 21st century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Nelson, C., N. Lurie, J. Wasserman, and S. Zakowski. 2007. Conceptualizing and defining public health emergency preparedness. Am J Public Health 97(Suppl 1):S9–S11. U.S. Senate. 2006 (August 3). Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act. Report [to accompany S. 3678]. Report 109–319, http://frwebgate.access. gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=109_cong_reports&docid=f:sr319.109. pdf. (accessed December 23, 2007). 29

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Schools of public health act as a resource by providing expertise to strengthen our nation's emergency response systems. In response to the Pandemic and All Hazards Preparedness Act (PAHPA), there is an immediate and critical need to define research priorities for the Centers for Public Health Preparedness (CPHP) at schools of public health. It is because of this crucial need, that the Institute of Medicine (IOM) convened an ad hoc committee, conducted a fast-track study, and issued the book entitled Research Priorities in Emergency Preparedness and Response for Public Health Systems. The book defines a set of near-term research priorities for emergency preparedness and response in public health systems. These priorities will be used by the Coordinating Office for Terrorism Preparedness and Emergency Response (COPTER) to help develop a research agenda that will in turn be used to inform research funding opportunity announcements.

After considering the information presented during the public meeting and workshop and based on its expert judgment, the committee identified four priority areas for research that represent specific important aspects of systems of public health preparedness. The four areas are

  • enhancing the usefulness of training;
  • improving timely emergency communications;
  • creating and maintaining sustainable response systems; and
  • generating effectiveness criteria and metrics.
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