National Academies Press: OpenBook

Improving Democracy Assistance: Building Knowledge Through Evaluations and Research (2008)

Chapter: Appendix D: Understanding Democratic Transitions and Consolidation from Case Studies: Lessons for Democracy Assistance

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Understanding Democratic Transitions and Consolidation from Case Studies: Lessons for Democracy Assistance." National Research Council. 2008. Improving Democracy Assistance: Building Knowledge Through Evaluations and Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12164.
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Page 285
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Understanding Democratic Transitions and Consolidation from Case Studies: Lessons for Democracy Assistance." National Research Council. 2008. Improving Democracy Assistance: Building Knowledge Through Evaluations and Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12164.
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Page 286
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Understanding Democratic Transitions and Consolidation from Case Studies: Lessons for Democracy Assistance." National Research Council. 2008. Improving Democracy Assistance: Building Knowledge Through Evaluations and Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12164.
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Page 287
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Understanding Democratic Transitions and Consolidation from Case Studies: Lessons for Democracy Assistance." National Research Council. 2008. Improving Democracy Assistance: Building Knowledge Through Evaluations and Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12164.
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Page 288

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D Understanding Democratic Transitions and Consolidation from Case Studies: Lessons for Democracy Assistance Co-sponsored by The National Academies and the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law, Stanford University Agenda March 5-6, 2007 Sunday, March 4, 2007 7:30 p.m. Planning Meeting and Working Dinner Monday, March 5, 2007 9:00 Welcome Remarks 9:05 Opening Address and Overview Michael McFaul, Director, CDDRL, Stanford University Jack Goldstone, George Mason University and Chair, NAS- CEUDAP Committee 9:35 Panel I: What Have We Learned About Democratic Transitions: Pacts or Protests? Moderator: Jack Goldstone, George Mason University 285

286 APPENDIX D Nancy Bermeo, Princeton University Adrian Karatnycky, Freedom House, Inc. Terry Karl, Stanford University Michael McFaul, Stanford University 10:20-10:40 Break 10:40-11:00 Panel Discussion Session 11:00-12:00 Open Discussion Session 12:00 LUNCH 1:00 Panel II: What Have We Learned About Democratic Transitions: Are Certain Socioeconomic or Political Conditions Required? Moderator: Larry Garber, New Israel Fund Sheri Berman, Barnard College Michael Bratton, Michigan State University Jason Brownlee, University of Texas at Austin Lucan Way, University of Toronto 1:45-2:05 Panel Discussion Sessions 2:05-2:45 Open Discussion Sessions 2:45-3:00 Break 3:00 Panel III: What Have We Learned About Democratic Transitions: What Comes First? What Role Will Foreign Assistance Play? Moderator: Jeremy Weinstein, Stanford University Tom Carothers, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace Gerry Hyman, Center for Strategic and International Studies Cynthia McClintock, George Washington University Risto Volanen, State Secretary, Finish Prime Minister’s Office 3:45-4:05 Panel Discussion Session 4:05-4:45 Open Discussion Session 6:30 CONFERENCE DINNER

APPENDIX D 287 Tuesday, March 6, 2007 9:00 Panel IV: What Have We Learned About Democratic Consolidation: Do Certain Rules and Procedures Work Better Than Others, and Can They Be Fitted to Known Conditions? Moderator: John Gerring, Boston University Gerardo Munck, University of Southern California Marc Plattner, National Endowment for Democracy Andy Reynolds, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Andreas Schedler, Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas, Mexico City 9:45-10:05 Panel Discussion Session 10:05-10:45 Open Discussion Session 10:45 Break 11:00 Panel V: What Have We Learned About Democratic Consolidation: Can We Combine Democracy Assistance and Other Forms of Aid to Promote Consolidation? Moderator: Mitch Seligson, Vanderbilt University Larry Diamond, Stanford University Amichai Magen, Stanford University Philippe Schmitter, European University Institute, Florence 11:45-12:05 Panel Discussion Session 12:05-12:45 Open Discussion Session 12:45 LUNCH 2:00 Conference Roundtable I Democracy Promotion: Developing Guidelines for Foreign Assistance Moderator: Kathryn Stoner-Weiss, Stanford University 3:00 Conference Roundtable II Democracy Consolidation: Developing Guidelines for Foreign Assistance Moderator: Jack Goldstone, George Mason University 4:00 Concluding Remarks Michael McFaul, Stanford University Jack Goldstone, George Mason University 4:30 Meeting Adjourns

288 APPENDIX D Participants Tabitha Benney Abe Lowenthal National Academies University of Southern California Sheri Berman Amichai Magen Barnard College Stanford University Nancy Bermeo Cynthia McClintock Princeton University George Washington University Michael Bratton Michael McFaul Michigan State University Stanford University Jason Brownlee Gerardo Munck University of Texas at Austin University of Southern California Tom Carothers Marc Plattner Carnegie Endowment for National Endowment for International Peace Democracy Larry Diamond Andy Reynolds Stanford University University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Jim Fearon Stanford University Andreas Schedler Facultad Latinoamericana de Larry Garber Ciencias Sociales New Israel Fund Philippe Schmitter John Gerring European University Institute, Boston University Florence Jack A. Goldstone Mitchell Seligson George Mason University Vanderbilt University Rita Guenther Kathryn Stoner-Weiss National Academies Stanford University Jo Husbands Risto Volanen National Academies Office of the Prime Minister Gerry Hyman Lucan Way Center for Strategic and University of Toronto International Studies Jeremy Weinstein Adrian Karatnycky Stanford University Freedom House, Inc. Jennifer Windsor Terry Karl Freedom House Stanford University

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Over the past 25 years, the United States has made support for the spread of democracy to other nations an increasingly important element of its national security policy. These efforts have created a growing demand to find the most effective means to assist in building and strengthening democratic governance under varied conditions.

Since 1990, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has supported democracy and governance (DG) programs in approximately 120 countries and territories, spending an estimated total of $8.47 billion (in constant 2000 U.S. dollars) between 1990 and 2005. Despite these substantial expenditures, our understanding of the actual impacts of USAID DG assistance on progress toward democracy remains limited--and is the subject of much current debate in the policy and scholarly communities.

This book, by the National Research Council, provides a roadmap to enable USAID and its partners to assess what works and what does not, both retrospectively and in the future through improved monitoring and evaluation methods and rebuilding USAID's internal capacity to build, absorb, and act on improved knowledge.

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