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Common Standards for K-12 Education?: Considering the Evidence: Summary of a Workshop Series (2008)

Chapter: Appendix A: January 2008 Workshop Agenda and Participants

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: January 2008 Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2008. Common Standards for K-12 Education?: Considering the Evidence: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12462.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: January 2008 Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2008. Common Standards for K-12 Education?: Considering the Evidence: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12462.
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Page 78
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: January 2008 Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2008. Common Standards for K-12 Education?: Considering the Evidence: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12462.
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Page 79
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: January 2008 Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2008. Common Standards for K-12 Education?: Considering the Evidence: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12462.
×
Page 80
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: January 2008 Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2008. Common Standards for K-12 Education?: Considering the Evidence: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12462.
×
Page 81
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: January 2008 Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2008. Common Standards for K-12 Education?: Considering the Evidence: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12462.
×
Page 82
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: January 2008 Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2008. Common Standards for K-12 Education?: Considering the Evidence: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12462.
×
Page 83
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: January 2008 Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2008. Common Standards for K-12 Education?: Considering the Evidence: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12462.
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Page 84

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Appendix A January 2008 Workshop Agenda and Participants Workshop on Assessing the Role of K-12 Academic Standards in States January 17-18, 2008 AGENDA THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2008 8:00 am Continental Breakfast 8:30 am Introduction and Goals of Workshop Series  Michael Feuer, National Research Council Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education  Judith Rizzo, James B. Hunt, Jr. Institute for Educational Leadership and Policy  Lorraine McDonnell, University of California at Santa Barbara, Workshop Series Steering Committee Chair SESSION 1: SETTING THE STATE STANDARDS POLICY CONTEXT Orienting the event’s discussions in an analysis of existing literature and new research results on contemporary state standards-based reform efforts in California, Florida, Massachusetts, North Dakota, and Texas. Framing Questions 1.  hat are the major roles that standards play in state K-12 educa- W tion policy and practice? 77

78 APPENDIX A 2.  hat are the major strengths and weaknesses of K-12 state W standards-based reform efforts with respect to achieving efficiency, equity, and quality? What are states doing to achieve these goals? 3.  ow and to what degree are the strengths and weaknesses of H reform efforts related to the standards themselves? How and to what degree have the standards changed other education policies in states? 4.  ow and to what degree are the strengths and weaknesses of H reform efforts related to having unique state standards? 9:00 am Introduction and Goals of Session Lorraine McDonnell 9:15 am Roles, Impacts, and Perceptions of Standards:  Review of Existing Research and Results from Elite Policy Maker Interviews in California, Florida, Massachusetts, North Dakota, and Texas Diane Massell, University of Michigan 9:45 am Moderated Discussion, Part 1: Research Perspectives Moderator: Lorraine McDonnell Panelists: Lynn Olson, Education Week Brian Stecher, RAND Corporation 10:45 am Break 11:00 am Moderated Discussion, Part 2: Policy and Practice Perspectives Moderator: Lorraine McDonnell Panelists: Rae Ann Kelsch, North Dakota State Representative Scott Montgomery, Council of Chief State School Officers Noon Session 1 Central Themes Lorraine McDonnell 12:15 pm Lunch

APPENDIX A 79 SESSION 2: ESTIMATING COSTS TO STATES Providing a framework for considering costs of state standards and accountability systems and applying that framework to developing empirical estimates in Florida, North Dakota, and Texas. Framing Questions 1.  hat are the major activities states undertake to develop and W maintain a standards-based K-12 education system? What is the nature of the costs to states associated with each of these major activities? 2. What are the sources of variation in these costs by state? 3.  hat are the costs associated with each major activity across select W states? 4. How much do state cost estimates vary for each activity? 5.  hat are the conceptual and technical issues involved in develop- W ing empirical estimates of these costs? 1:15 pm Introduction and Goals for Session Lauress (Laurie) Wise, HumRRO 1:30 pm What States Do to Implement Standards-Based K-12 Education: Toward a Framework for Estimating State Costs Margaret (Peg) Goertz, University of Pennsylvania 1:50 pm Developing Empirical Estimates of State Costs: Results from Florida, North Dakota, and Texas Douglas Harris, University of Wisconsin, Madison Lori Taylor, Texas A&M University 2:30 pm Break 2:45 pm Moderated Discussion, Part 1: Research and Business Perspectives Moderator: Laurie Wise Panelists: Thomas Toch, Education Sector Susan Traiman, Business Roundtable

80 APPENDIX A 3:30 pm Break 3:45 pm Moderated Discussion, Part 2: Policy and Practice Perspectives Moderator: Laurie Wise Panelists: David Driscoll, National Assessment Governing Board R. Mark Harris, Human Capital Strategies 4:30 pm Session 2 Central Themes Laurie Wise 4:45 pm End of Formal Agenda for Day 5:00 pm Reception 6:00 pm Dinner FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2008 8:00 am Continental Breakfast SESSION 3: ANALYZING STATE STANDARDS Assessing the similarities and differences across K-12 state content and performance standards in core academic subject areas. Framing Questions 1.  ow and to what extent do K-12 state content standards vary in H English/language arts, mathematics, and science at key grades? 2.  ow and to what extent do K-12 state performance standards H vary in English/language arts, mathematics, and science at key grades? 3.  ow and to what extent does the implementation of K-12 state H content and performance standards in classrooms vary in multiple academic subjects? 8:30 am Introduction and Goals for Session Thomas Corcoran, Teachers College

APPENDIX A 81 8:45 am Comparing State Content Standards:  Topical Coverage and Cognitive Demand in Grades 4 and 8 Reading, Mathematics, and Science in Select States Andrew (Andy) Porter, University of Pennsylvania John Smithson, University of Wisconsin 9:15 am Comparing State Performance Standards: Results from Two Recent Studies Peggy G. Carr, National Center for Education Statistics Michael Petrilli, Thomas B. Fordham Foundation 10:00 am Moderated Discussion, Part 1: Research Perspectives Moderator: Tom Corcoran Panelists: William Schmidt, Michigan State University Barbara Reys, University of Missouri 10:45 am Break 11:00 am Moderated Discussion, Part 2: Policy and Practice Perspectives Moderator: Tom Corcoran Panelists: Peter McWalters, Rhode Island Commissioner of Education Roy Romer, Strong American Schools Campaign 11:45 am Session 3 Central Themes Tom Corcoran BREAKOUT GROUPS: LOOKING ACROSS ISSUES Developing ideas from across the three sessions in small, mixed-role groups. Noon Working Lunch in Breakout Groups Goals, Introductions, Brainstorming 12:30 pm Break-out Group Moderated Discussions

82 APPENDIX A 1:45 pm Reporting Out Group Moderators 2:15 pm Wrap-Up of Workshop 1: Reflections on Workshop Themes Moderator: Lorraine McDonnell Panelists: Robert Linn, University of Colorado William Tate, Washington University in St. Louis Karen Wixson, University of Michigan 3:00 pm Looking Ahead to Workshop 2: Outstanding Issues and Questions Judith Rizzo 3:30 pm Adjourn

APPENDIX A 83 PARTICIPANTS Allison Armour-Garb, Education Studies, Rockefeller Institute of Government Alix Beatty, Center for Education, The National Academies Ilene Berman, Education Division, National Governors Association Center for Best Practices Peggy G. Carr, National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education Betty Carvellas, Teacher Advisory Council, The National Academies Michael Casserly, Council of the Great City Schools Thomas Corcoran, CPRE, Teachers College, Columbia University Stephanie Dean, The Hunt Institute David Driscoll, National Assessment Governing Board Kelly Duncan, Center for Education, The National Academies Stuart Elliott, Center for Education, The National Academies Mark Emblidge, Virginia Board of Education William Ewell, The Hunt Institute Michael Feuer, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, The National Academies Catherine Freeman, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, The National Academies Michael Gilligan, The Hunt Institute Margaret E. Goertz, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania Steven Gorman, National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education Lisa Guckian, The Hunt Institute Ferrel Guillory, The Hunt Institute Daria Hall, The Education Trust Douglas N. Harris, Educational Policy Studies, University of Wisconsin at Madison R. Mark Harris, Human Capital Strategies, LLC Margaret Hilton, Center for Education, The National Academies Barbara Kapinus, National Education Association Rae Ann Kelsch, North Dakota State Representative Judy Koenig, Center for Education, The National Academies Andrew Kolstad, National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education Barnett A. (Sandy) Kress, Akin Gump Stauss Hauer & Feld LLP Stephanie Levin, CPRE, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania Dane Linn, National Governors Association

84 APPENDIX A Robert L. Linn, Department of Education, University of Colorado at Boulder Bethany Little, Alliance for Excellent Education Diane Massell, Consortium for Policy Research in Education, University of Michigan Lorraine M. McDonnell, Department of Political Science, University of California, Santa Barbara Gregory F. McGinity, The Broad Foundation Peter McWalters, Rhode Island Department of Education Talia Milgrom-Elcott, Carnegie Corporation Scott Montgomery, Council of Chief State School Officers Patricia Morison, Center for Education, The National Academies Lynn Olson, Education Week Michael Petrilli, Thomas B. Fordham Foundation Morgan Polikoff, Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Pennsylvania Andy Porter, Graduate School of EducationUniversity of Pennsylvania Suellen Reed, Indiana Department of Education Michael Resnick, National School Boards Association Barbara J. Reys, Learning Teaching and Curriculum, University of Missouri Judith Rizzo, The Hunt Institute Roy Romer, Strong American Schools Campaign Ian Rosenblum, Governor’s Office of Pennsylvania William Schmidt, Michigan State University Sheila R. Schultz, Educational Policy Impact Center, Human Resources Research Organization John Smithson, Measures of the Enacted Curriculum, University of Wisconsin at Madison Brian Stecher, RAND Corporation William Tate, Department of Arts and Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis Lori Taylor, Bush School of Government, Texas A&M University Thomas Toch, Education Sector Lisa Towne, Center for Education, The National Academies Susan Traiman, Education and Workforce Policy, Business Roundtable Ruth Wattenberg, American Federation of Teachers Lauress (Laurie) Wise, Human Resources Research Organization Karen K. Wixson, School of Education, University of Michigan

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Standards-based accountability has become a central feature of the public education system in each state and is a theme of national discussions about how achievement for all students can be improved and achievement gaps narrowed. Questions remain, however, about the implementation of standards and accountability systems and about whether their potential benefits have been fully realized. Each of the 50 states has adopted its own set of standards, and though there is overlap among them, there is also wide variation in the ways states have devised and implemented their systems. This variety may have both advantages and disadvantages, but it nevertheless raises a fundamental question: Is the establishment of common K-12 academic standards, which states could voluntarily adopt, the logical next step for standards-based reform?

The goal of this book is not to answer the policy question of whether or not common standards would be a good idea. Rather, the book provides an objective look at the available evidence regarding the ways in which standards are currently functioning, the strategies that might be used to pursue common standards, and the issues that doing so might present.

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