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Cleaning Up Sites Contaminated with Radioactive Materials: International Workshop Proceedings (2009)

Chapter: Opening Remarks, 1 Welcoming Remarks--Nikolay Laverov

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Suggested Citation:"Opening Remarks, 1 Welcoming Remarks--Nikolay Laverov." National Research Council. 2009. Cleaning Up Sites Contaminated with Radioactive Materials: International Workshop Proceedings. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12505.
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Page 1
Suggested Citation:"Opening Remarks, 1 Welcoming Remarks--Nikolay Laverov." National Research Council. 2009. Cleaning Up Sites Contaminated with Radioactive Materials: International Workshop Proceedings. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12505.
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Page 2
Suggested Citation:"Opening Remarks, 1 Welcoming Remarks--Nikolay Laverov." National Research Council. 2009. Cleaning Up Sites Contaminated with Radioactive Materials: International Workshop Proceedings. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12505.
×
Page 3
Suggested Citation:"Opening Remarks, 1 Welcoming Remarks--Nikolay Laverov." National Research Council. 2009. Cleaning Up Sites Contaminated with Radioactive Materials: International Workshop Proceedings. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12505.
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Page 4

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Opening Remarks

1 Welcoming Remarks Nikolay Laverov, Russian Academy of Sciences In Russia the most serious contamination of territories with radioactive materials is due primarily to development and fabrication of nuclear weapons, submarines, and icebreakers. First and foremost, we are concerned about the areas hosting (1) the Mayak reprocessing facility, (2) navy bases in the north European part of Russia and the Pacific Coast region, and (3) Kara Sea hot spots adjacent to Novaya Zemlya, where damaged nuclear submarines, the reactor of the ice- breaker Lenin, and compacted radioactive waste have been deposited. In past years, research has been carried out to facilitate efforts to clean up contaminated territories, develop new decontamination technologies, and reduce radionuclide levels in reservoirs like Karachai Lake, the Techa Cascade, the Kola fjords, and elsewhere. Meanwhile, the Principles of State Policy for Elimination of Radiation Hazards that were approved by President Vladimir Putin have de- fined objectives aimed at removing the waste that accumulated during the arms race in the Soviet era and that resulted from peaceful uses of atomic energy. A long-term program (up to 2020) on radioactive waste management and rehabilita- tion of contaminated areas has been developed. I hope that at this workshop participants will present new findings on im- proved technologies for such work and that new opportunities for joint collabora- 

 CLEANING UP SITES CONTAMINATED WITH RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS tion will emerge to promote the application of knowledge, expertise, and practical experience existing not only in Russia but in the United States and other countries as well. I wish all participants every success in carrying out their seminal work at the workshop.

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This publication features papers presented at the Workshop on Cleaning Up Sites Contaminated with Radioactive Materials, held in Moscow in June 2007. This activity was organized by the National Academies in cooperation with the Russian Academy of Sciences and with funding provided by the Russell Family Foundation. The workshop was designed to promote exchanges of information on specific contaminated sites in Russia and elsewhere and to stimulate greater attention to the severity of the problems and the urgent need to clean up sites of concern to the local and international communities.

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