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Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2008 Symposium (2009)

Chapter: DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS, Introduction--William J. Grieco and Efrosini Kokkoli

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Suggested Citation:"DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS, Introduction--William J. Grieco and Efrosini Kokkoli." National Academy of Engineering. 2009. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2008 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12523.
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Suggested Citation:"DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS, Introduction--William J. Grieco and Efrosini Kokkoli." National Academy of Engineering. 2009. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2008 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12523.
×
Page 2
Suggested Citation:"DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS, Introduction--William J. Grieco and Efrosini Kokkoli." National Academy of Engineering. 2009. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2008 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12523.
×
Page 3
Suggested Citation:"DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS, Introduction--William J. Grieco and Efrosini Kokkoli." National Academy of Engineering. 2009. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2008 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12523.
×
Page 4

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Drug Delivery Systems

Introduction William J. Grieco PetroAlgae Melbourne, Florida Efrosini Kokkoli University of Minnesota Minneapolis, Minnesota Historically, the concept of “drug delivery” has referred to any method of introducing a therapeutic agent into the human body. Traditional delivery meth- ods included oral ingestion, injection, inhalation, and other pathways. Over the past 20 years, advances in materials, particularly polymer systems, have enabled more careful engineering of delivery systems. Current drug-delivery systems now include methods of using traditional mechanisms, such as oral and injection techniques, to introduce engineered particles or devices into the body that can eliminate the necessity of daily doses by providing sustained release therapies. Micro- and nanoengineered systems now offer opportunities to minimize sys- temic side effects by targeting the delivery of therapies to particular physiological systems. The presentations in this section provide an overview of drug-delivery meth- odologies from academic and industrial perspectives. The focus is on polymeric materials for engineering delivery systems. Speakers highlight several key tech- nologies for targeting and controlling the release of bioactive materials. 

Next: Recent Developments in Needle-Free Drug Delivery--Samir Mitragotri »
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Every year at the U.S. Frontiers of Engineering Symposium, 100 of this country's best and brightest engineers, ages 30 to 45, have an opportunity to learn from their peers about pioneering work being done in many areas of engineering. The symposium gives early career engineers working in academia, industry, and government in many different engineering disciplines an opportunity to make contacts with and learn from individuals they would not meet in the usual round of professional meetings. This networking may lead to collaborative work and facilitate the transfer of new techniques and approaches. It is hoped that the exchange of information on current developments in many fields of engineering will lead to insights that may be applicable in specific disciplines and thereby build U.S. innovative capacity. Different topics are covered each year, and, with a few exceptions, different individuals participate.

The four general topics covered at the 2008 meeting were: drug delivery systems, emerging nanoelectronic devices, cognitive engineering, and countering the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The intent of this book is to convey the excitement of this unique meeting and to highlight cutting-edge developments in engineering research and technical work.

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