National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Appendix C: Poster Abstracts
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Attendees." National Research Council. 2009. Strengthening High School Chemistry Education Through Teacher Outreach Programs: A Workshop Summary to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12533.
×
Page 56
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Attendees." National Research Council. 2009. Strengthening High School Chemistry Education Through Teacher Outreach Programs: A Workshop Summary to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12533.
×
Page 57

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

D Workshop Attendees Roxie Allen, Association of Chemistry Teachers of Texas Myra Halpin, North Carolina School of Sciences and (ACT2), Houston Mathematics, Durham Patricia Baisden, National Nuclear Security Kiara Hargrove, Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, Administration/Department of Energy, Washington, DC Baltimore, Maryland L. Anthony Beck, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Alex Harris, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, Maryland New York Michael Berman, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Sharon Haynie, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, Arlington, Virginia Wilmington, Delaware Constance Blaise, University of Pennsylvania, Eric Jakobsson, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Philadelphia Ellen M. Johnson, Wilmington Friends School, Paul Bryan, Chevron, Richmond, California Wilmington, Delaware Mark Cardillo, Camille & Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Bonnie Kaiser, The Rockefeller University, New York New York Thomas E. Keller, National Academy of Sciences, William Carroll, Oxy Chem, Dallas, Texas Washington, DC Charles Casey, University of Wisconsin, Madison Brian J. Kennedy, Thomas Jefferson High School for John Chen, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania Science and Technology, Alexandria, Virginia Katherine Covert, National Science Foundation, Mary Kirchoff, American Chemical Society, Arlington, Virginia Washington, DC Edward Crowe, Carnegie Corporation, Washington, DC Michael Klein, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Hai-Lung Dai, Temple University, Philadelphia, Jeff Krause, Department of Energy, Washington, DC Pennsylvania Sandra Laursen, University of Colorado, Boulder Reeny Davison, ASSET Inc., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Marshall Lih, National Science Foundation, Arlington, Jeff Dilks, Department of Energy, Washington, DC Virginia Jay Dubner, Columbia University, New York Paul McKenzie, Centocor R&D, Radnor, Pennsylvania Diana Dummitt, University of Illinois at Jin Montclare, State University of New York, Brooklyn Urbana-Champaign Sergey Nizkorodov, University of California, Irvine Caryn Galatis, Thomas A. Edison High School, Susan V. Olesik, Ohio State University, Columbus Alexandria, Virginia Gilbert Pacey, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio Penny J. Gilmer, Florida State University, Tallahassee Michael Page, California State Polytechnic University, Marta Gmurczyk, American Chemical Society, Pomona Washington, DC Joan T. Prival, National Science Foundation, Arlington, Bryce Hach, Hach Scientific Foundation, Fort Collins, Virginia Colorado Marquita Qualls, Entropia, West Chester, Pennsylvania Michael Rogers, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 56

APPENDIX D 57 Sophie Rovner, Chemical and Engineering News, Robert Tai, University of Virginia, Charlottesville Washington, DC Irwin Talesnick, Queens University, Ontario, Canada Kim Schaaf, PPG Industries, Allison Park, Pennsylvania Terri Taylor, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC Hratch Semerjian, The Council for Chemical Research, Gerry Wheeler, National Science Teachers Association, Washington, DC Washington, DC Loraine Snead, Wilmington Friends School, Wilmington, Ken White, BNL Office of Educational Opportunity, Delaware Upton, New York Patricia Soochan, HHMI, Chevy Chase, Maryland Stacie Williams, University of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio Kaye Storm, Stanford University, Stanford, California Edee Wiziecki, University of Illinois at Kathryn Sullivan, Battelle Center for Mathematics & Urbana-Champaign Science Education Policy, Columbus, Ohio

Next: Appendix E: Origin of and Information on the Chemical Sciences Roundtable »
Strengthening High School Chemistry Education Through Teacher Outreach Programs: A Workshop Summary to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $29.00 Buy Ebook | $23.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

A strong chemical workforce in the United States will be essential to the ability to address many issues of societal concern in the future, including demand for renewable energy, more advanced materials, and more sophisticated pharmaceuticals. High school chemistry teachers have a critical role to play in engaging and supporting the chemical workforce of the future, but they must be sufficiently knowledgeable and skilled to produce the levels of scientific literacy that students need to succeed.

To identify key leverage points for improving high school chemistry education, the National Academies' Chemical Sciences Roundtable held a public workshop, summarized in this volume, that brought together representatives from government, industry, academia, scientific societies, and foundations involved in outreach programs for high school chemistry teachers. Presentations at the workshop, which was held in August 2008, addressed the current status of high school chemistry education; provided examples of public and private outreach programs for high school chemistry teachers; and explored ways to evaluate the success of these outreach programs.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!