National Academies Press: OpenBook

Medical Isotope Production Without Highly Enriched Uranium (2009)

Chapter: Appendix C: Presentations and Visits

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Research Council. 2009. Medical Isotope Production Without Highly Enriched Uranium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12569.
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Page 181
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Research Council. 2009. Medical Isotope Production Without Highly Enriched Uranium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12569.
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Page 182
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Research Council. 2009. Medical Isotope Production Without Highly Enriched Uranium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12569.
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Page 183

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Appendix C Presentations and Visits Washington, D.C., February 15–16, 2007 • Department of Energy-National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Global Threat Reduction, Nicole Nelson-Jean, DOE-NNSA, O ­ ffice of North and South American Threat Reduction; Parrish Staples, DOE-NNSA, Office of Global Threat Reduction • Initiatives for the Development of Commercially Viable Mo-99 Production Methods Using LEU, Roy W. Brown, Council on Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals (CORAR) • Conversion of Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) Production to LEU Target Technology, Grant Malkoske, MDS-Nordion • OPAL (Open Pool Australian Lightwater) Reactor and ­Molybdenum- 99, Therese Donlevy, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisa- tion (ANSTO) • Mallinckrodt’s Approach to HEU to LEU Conversion, Richard A. Roberts, Tyco Health Care/Mallinckrodt • The Security Imperative of Eliminating Commercial Use of HEU, Ed S. Lyman, Union of Concerned Scientists • Cost of Converting from HEU to LEU Targets for Medical Radio- isotope Production, Frank von Hippel, Princeton University • IAEA Input to NAS Study on Medical Radioisotope Production without HEU, Ira Goldman, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) 181

182 APPENDIX C Washington, D.C., April 10–11, 2007 • ANL Perspective on Conversion of Mo-99 Production from High to Low Enriched Uranium, George Vandegrift, Argonne National Labora- tory (ANL) • Commercial Production of Fission Mo-99 from LEU Targets in Argentina, Pablo Cristini and Marcelo Salvatore, Comisión Nacional de Energia Atómica (CNEA) and INVAP (Investigaciones Aplicadas Sociedad del Estado) • Commercial Production of Fission Radioisotopes from LEU Targets in Argentina, Pablo Cristini, CNEA • FDA’s Regulatory Role in Medical Isotope Production, Orhan S ­ uleiman, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) • NRC’s Process for Licensing Exports of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Medical Isotope Target Material, Stephen Dembek, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) • Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Exports for Medical Isotope Pro- duction, Edward T. Fei, NNSA • Conversion of Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) Production to LEU Target Technology, Grant Malkoske, MDS Nordion • Mallinckrodt’s Mo-99 Process & Progress to LEU Conversion, Dale Simpson, Tyco Healthcare/Mallinckrodt • Ion Beam Applications: Past, Present, and Future, Henri Bonet, Institute National des Radioéléments (IRE) Washington, D.C., June 11–12, 2007 • Global Threat Reduction Initiative–Reactor Conversion Program– Molybdenum-99 Production with LEU, Parrish Staples, DOE-NNSA • Drug Master File Development and FDA Filings for LEU-Produced Medical Radionuclides, Roy Brown, CORAR • Cardinal Health Nuclear Pharmacy Services, Jack Coffey, Cardinal Health • The Cost of Developing Imaging Agents for Routine Clinical Use, Adrian Nunn, Bracco Research • Status of IAEA Mo-99 Activities, Ira Goldman, IAEA • National Academy of Sciences: Medical Isotope Production Study, Ralph Butler, University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) • AECL’s Medical Isotope Production, Brian McGee, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL)

APPENDIX C 183 St. Louis, Missouri, October 15–17, 2007 • Supporting the Nation’s Nuclear Medicine Research–Update, Ralph A. Butler, MURR • Efforts by Current Commercial Mo-99 Producers to Examine LEU Technologies, Roy W. Brown, CORAR Site Visits • August 20–21, 2007: Visit to AECL Chalk River Laboratories (Chalk River, Ontario, Canada) and MDS Nordion (Kanata, Ontario, Canada) • December 17–18, 2007: Visit to ANSTO (Lucas Heights, Australia) • March 10–12, 2008: Visit to IRE (Fleures, Belguim), CERCA ( ­ Romans, France) and Mallinckrodt (Petten, the Netherlands) • June 5–6, 2008: Visit to CNEA (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

Next: Appendix D: Alternative Molybdenum-99 Production Processes »
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This book is the product of a congressionally mandated study to examine the feasibility of eliminating the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU2) in reactor fuel, reactor targets, and medical isotope production facilities. The book focuses primarily on the use of HEU for the production of the medical isotope molybdenum-99 (Mo-99), whose decay product, technetium-99m3 (Tc-99m), is used in the majority of medical diagnostic imaging procedures in the United States, and secondarily on the use of HEU for research and test reactor fuel.

The supply of Mo-99 in the U.S. is likely to be unreliable until newer production sources come online. The reliability of the current supply system is an important medical isotope concern; this book concludes that achieving a cost difference of less than 10 percent in facilities that will need to convert from HEU- to LEU-based Mo-99 production is much less important than is reliability of supply.

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