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Global Security Engagement: A New Model for Cooperative Threat Reduction (2009)

Chapter: Appendix H: A Comparison of the Characteristics of Six Weapons Systems from the Perspective of a State or Terrorist Organization

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: A Comparison of the Characteristics of Six Weapons Systems from the Perspective of a State or Terrorist Organization." National Academy of Sciences. 2009. Global Security Engagement: A New Model for Cooperative Threat Reduction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12583.
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Page 155
Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: A Comparison of the Characteristics of Six Weapons Systems from the Perspective of a State or Terrorist Organization." National Academy of Sciences. 2009. Global Security Engagement: A New Model for Cooperative Threat Reduction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12583.
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Page 156
Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: A Comparison of the Characteristics of Six Weapons Systems from the Perspective of a State or Terrorist Organization." National Academy of Sciences. 2009. Global Security Engagement: A New Model for Cooperative Threat Reduction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12583.
×
Page 157
Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: A Comparison of the Characteristics of Six Weapons Systems from the Perspective of a State or Terrorist Organization." National Academy of Sciences. 2009. Global Security Engagement: A New Model for Cooperative Threat Reduction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12583.
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Page 158

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Appendix H A Comparison of the Characteristics of Six Weapons Systems from the Perspective of a State or Terrorist Organization Legend Detectable signature? No, Maybe, Yes Barriers to development Very High, High, Moderate, Low Technical experts Many, Some, Few, Very Few Casualty potential Very High, High, Moderate, Low, Low (High   Economic), Very Low Is technical capability a limitation? Yes, No Availability of materials Few, Some, Many Access to materials Very Poor, Poor, Good, Very Good, Universal Intelligence target Very Hard, Hard, Moderately Hard, Moderately   Easy Dual use Yes, No Trackable/detectable? Yes, Maybe Attribution possibility? High, Moderate, Low, Very low  Table developed by Dr. David Franz. 155

156 Nuclear Biological Chemical State Substate State Substate State Substate Detectable signature? Yes Maybe Maybe Maybe Yes Maybe Barriers to development High Very High Moderate Moderate Low Moderate Technical experts Few Very Few Many Very Few Many Few Casualty potential Very High Very High Very High to High to Moderate to Low Very Low Very Low Low Is technical capability a Yes Yes No Yes No No limitation? Availability of materials Few Few Many Many Some Some Access to materials Poor Very Poor Good Poor Very Good Good Intelligence target Moderately Easy Moderately Hard Very Hard Very Hard Moderately Hard Hard Dual use Yes N/A Yes N/A Yes N/A Trackable/detectable? Yes Maybe Maybe Maybe Maybe Maybe Attribution possibility? High to Moderate Moderate Low Very Low Low Very Low

Radiological Conventional Explosive Cyber State Substate State Substate State Substate Detectable signature? Maybe Maybe No No Maybe Maybe Barriers to development Low Moderate Low Low Low Low Technical experts Some Few Many Many Many Some Casualty potential Low (High  Low (High High to Low  High to Low N/A N/A Economic) Economic) Is technical capability a limitation? No Yes No No No No Availability of materials Some Some Many Many Universal Universal Access to materials Good Poor Very Good Good Universal Universal Intelligence target Very Hard Hard Very Hard Very Hard Hard Hard Dual Use Yes N/A Yes N/A No N/A Trackable/detectable? Maybe Maybe Maybe Maybe Maybe Maybe Attribution possibility? Low Very Low Low Very Low Moderate Moderate 157

Next: Appendix I: Department of Defense Cooperative Threat Reduction Programs »
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The government's first Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) programs were created in 1991 to eliminate the former Soviet Union's nuclear, chemical, and other weapons and prevent their proliferation. The programs have accomplished a great deal: deactivating thousands of nuclear warheads, neutralizing chemical weapons, converting weapons facilities for peaceful use, and redirecting the work of former weapons scientists and engineers, among other efforts. Originally designed to deal with immediate post-Cold War challenges, the programs must be expanded to other regions and fundamentally redesigned as an active tool of foreign policy that can address contemporary threats from groups that are that are agile, networked, and adaptable. As requested by Congress, Global Security Engagement proposes how this goal can best be achieved.

To meet the magnitude of new security challenges, particularly at the nexus of weapons of mass destruction and terrorism, Global Security Engagement recommends a new, more flexible, and responsive model that will draw on a broader range of partners than current programs have. The White House, working across the Executive Branch and with Congress, must lead this effort.

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