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Sustaining Global Surveillance and Response to Emerging Zoonotic Diseases (2009)

Chapter: Appendix D: Public Committee Meeting Agendas

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Public Committee Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2009. Sustaining Global Surveillance and Response to Emerging Zoonotic Diseases. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12625.
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Page 295
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Public Committee Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2009. Sustaining Global Surveillance and Response to Emerging Zoonotic Diseases. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12625.
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Page 296
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Public Committee Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2009. Sustaining Global Surveillance and Response to Emerging Zoonotic Diseases. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12625.
×
Page 297
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Public Committee Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2009. Sustaining Global Surveillance and Response to Emerging Zoonotic Diseases. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12625.
×
Page 298
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Public Committee Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2009. Sustaining Global Surveillance and Response to Emerging Zoonotic Diseases. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12625.
×
Page 299
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Public Committee Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2009. Sustaining Global Surveillance and Response to Emerging Zoonotic Diseases. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12625.
×
Page 300
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Public Committee Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2009. Sustaining Global Surveillance and Response to Emerging Zoonotic Diseases. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12625.
×
Page 301
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Public Committee Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2009. Sustaining Global Surveillance and Response to Emerging Zoonotic Diseases. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12625.
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Page 302

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Appendix D Public Committee Meeting Agendas MEETING ONE June 25–26, 2008 Washington, DC June , 00 9:30–10:15 am Registration and Check-In All participants must check in at the security desk SESSION I: CHARGE AND STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM 10:15–10:25 am Welcome and Opening Remarks Marguerite Pappaioanou and Gerald Keusch, committee co-chairs 10:25–10:45 am Charge to the Committee from the Sponsor Dennis Carroll and Murray Trostle, USAID 10:45–11:15 am Keynote Presentation: Convergence of Forces Behind Emerging and Reemerging Zoonoses, and Future Trends in Zoonoses Tracee Treadwell, CDC 

 GLOBAL SURVEILLANCE AND RESPONSE TO zOONOTIC DISEASES 11:15 am–12:00 pm Panel Discussion: The Need for a Global and Sustainable Disease Surveillance System for Zoonoses, and Roles of Various International Organizations Moderator: Gerald Keusch, committee co-chair Panelists Nancy Cox, CDC Stephane de La Rocque, FAO Marlo Libel, Pan American Health Organization, on behalf of David Heymann, WHO Alejandro Thiermann, OIE Tracee Treadwell, CDC 12:00–1:00 pm Lunch SESSION II: ACTIVE SURVEILLANCE SYSTEMS FOR DETECTING ZOONOSES Moderator: Mark Woolhouse, committee member 1:00–1:15 pm Global Early Warning System (GLEWS) and Transboundary Disease Surveillance Program Stephane de La Rocque, FAO 1:15–1:30 pm OIE Standards for Identifying/Diagnosing Diseases, Diagnostic Confirmation, Data Collection and Reporting from Countries, Network of Reference Laboratories, Relationships with Chief Veterinary Officers—Committee Work, Food Safety (Codex Alimentarius) Alejandro Thiermann, OIE 1:30–2:00 pm Surveillance and Outbreak Investigation of Wildlife—Terrestrial and Marine Animals, Birds, Wildlife Disease Information Node • Wildlife Disease Information Node Joshua Dein (on NBII), USGS National Wildlife Health Center • Outbreak Investigation Scott Wright, USGS National Wildlife Health Center

 APPENDIX D 2:00–2:15 pm Ebola Surveillance in Nonhuman Primates Pierre Rollin, CDC 2:15–2:30 pm Surveillance of Bats Peter Daszak, Consortium for Conservation Medicine 2:30–2:45 pm Surveillance of Bushmeat and Exotic Animal Consumption and GAINS William Karesh, Wildlife Conservation Society 2:45–3:00 pm Surveillance of Infectious Diseases in Companion Animals Larry Glickman, Purdue University 3:00–3:45 pm Panel Discussion: Active Surveillance Systems with Presenters from Session II 3:45–4:00 pm Break SESSION III: EARLY WARNING SYSTEMS FOR ZOONOTIC DISEASES IN HUMANS Moderator: Mo Salman, committee member 4:00–5:00 pm Overview of Early Warning Systems • Global Public Health Intelligence Network (GPHIN) Marlo Libel, PAHO • Global Outbreak Awareness and Response Network (GOARN) Marlo Libel, PAHO • ProMED-Mail Peter Cowen, North Carolina State University • U.S. Department of Defense, Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (DoD-GEIS) Tracy DuVernoy, U.S. Department of Defense • ArboNET Marc Fischer, CDC (via teleconference) • Emerging Infections Network (IDSA) Philip Polgreen, University of Iowa

 GLOBAL SURVEILLANCE AND RESPONSE TO zOONOTIC DISEASES 5:00–6:00 pm Panel Discussion: Early Warning Systems with Presenters from Session III 6:00 pm Adjourn for the Day 6:30–8:30 pm Committee Working Dinner June , 00 8:00–8:30 am Registration and Check-In 8:30–8:45 am Recap of Day 1 and Overview of Day 2 of the Workshop Gerald Keusch and Marguerite Pappaioanou, committee co-chairs SESSION IV: LABORATORY AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL CAPACITY Moderator: Terry McElwain, committee member 8:45–9:00 am Broad View of Veterinary/Agricultural Laboratory Capacity in Resource-Constrained Countries (Clinical and Field Training, BSL-3 Labs, Biosecurity Issues) James Pearson, former director of National Veterinary Services Lab (retired) 9:00–9:15 am Reference Lab Perspective—Experience Serving as an OIE Reference Laboratory and Providing Technical Assistance and Training to Countries in Africa on Avian Influenza; International Policies for Sharing Specimens and Resources and Lab Data Ilaria Capua, OIE 9:15–9:30 am Training and Deployment of Assays in Other Countries and Standardization of Assays Worldwide Barbara Martin, coordinator for the U.S. National Animal Health Laboratory Network

 APPENDIX D 9:30–9:45 am Experience and Challenges in Establishing and Sustaining Operation of Laboratories in Tanzania with High-Quality Assurance Mmeta Grasford Yongolo, virology department of the Animal Diseases Research Institute 9:45–10:00 am Integrated Emerging Infectious Disease Surveillance in Nairobi, Kenya Robert Breiman, CDC International Emerging Infectious Diseases Program 10:00–10:15 am Clinical Laboratory and Epidemiological Field Training in Southeast Asia Jeremy Farrar, Oxford University Clinical Research Unit 10:15–11:00 am Break 11:00 am–12:00 pm Panel Discussion: Laboratory and Epidemiological Capacity with Presenters from Session IV 12:00–1:15 pm Lunch SESSION V: FACILITATING INFORMATION EXCHANGE, IMPROVING COMMUNICATION, AND IMPROVING POLICIES 1:15–2:30 pm Facilitating Information Exchange, Improving Communication, and Improving Policies Moderated Panel Discussion (20 minutes): Moderator: Gerald Keusch, committee co-chair Panelists Ilaria Capua, OIE Stephane de La Rocque, FAO Marlo Libel, WHO/PAHO Alejandro Thiermann, OIE 2:30–3:00 pm Break

00 GLOBAL SURVEILLANCE AND RESPONSE TO zOONOTIC DISEASES SESSION VI: DEVELOPING A GLOBAL AND SUSTAINABLE SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM 3:00–5:15 pm Moderated General Discussion: Developing Global Sustainable Surveillance and Response to Emerging Zoonoses Moderators: Gerald Keusch and Marguerite Pappaioanou, committee co-chairs 5:15–5:30 pm Closing Remarks Gerald Keusch and Marguerite Pappaioanou, committee co-chairs 5:30 pm Adjourn MEETING TWO September 11, 2008 Washington, DC 9:30–9:45 am Welcome and Introductions Marguerite Pappaioanou, committee co-chair 9:45–10:15 am Presentation Dr. David Nabarro, assistant secretary-general of the United Nations, senior United Nations system coordinator for avian and human influenza 10:15–11:30 am Question-and-Answer Session with Committee Members 11:30–11:45 am Wrap-Up and Adjourn MEETING THREE September 30, 2008 Woods Hole, MA 1:00–2:00 pm Economic Impact of Disease and the Case for Surveillance Bruce Y. Lee, University of Pittsburgh

0 APPENDIX D 2:00–3:00 pm Economic Consequence Modeling on Foreign Animal and Zoonotic Diseases Yanhong Jin, Rutgers University Bruce McCarl, Texas A&M University (via videoconference) 3:00–3:15 pm Break 3:15–4:15 pm Impact of Zoonotic Disease on Trade and Small- Scale Producers Karl Rich, American University in Cairo (via videoconference) 4:15–5:15 pm The Role of Public–Private Partnerships in Strengthening Food Systems Globally Gary Ades, Safe Supply of Affordable Food Everywhere, Inc. 5:15–5:30 pm Additional Questions and Answers and Closing Remarks 5:30 pm Adjourn MEETING FOUR November 18, 2008 Washington, DC 1:30–1:45 pm Welcome and Introductions Gerald Keusch, committee co-chair 1:45–2:00 pm Presentation Dr. Nirmal Ganguly, former director general, Indian Council of Medical Research 2:00–2:15 pm Committee Question-and-Answer Session with Dr. Ganguly 2:15–2:30 pm Presentation Dr. Mark Smolinski, director, Predict and Prevent Initiative, Google.org

0 GLOBAL SURVEILLANCE AND RESPONSE TO zOONOTIC DISEASES 2:30–2:45 pm Committee Question-and-Answer Session with Dr. Smolinski 2:45–3:00 pm Wrap-Up and Adjourn MEETING FIVE December 1, 2008 Washington, DC 10:00–10:15 am Welcome and Meeting Objectives Gerald Keusch and Marguerite Pappaioanou, committee co-chairs 10:15–11:30 am Implementation of IHRs David Heymann, Max Hardiman, Michael Ryan, and Paul Gully, WHO (World Health Organization) 11:30 am–12:40 pm Reaction to IHR implementation Alejandro Thiermann (for Bernard Vallat), OIE (World Organization for Animal Health) 12:40–1:15 pm Lunch 1:15–2:30 pm Regulating Companion and Lab Animal Imports Nina Marano, CDC 2:30–3:20 pm Monitoring Wildlife Trade Sheila Einsweiler, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 3:20 pm Adjourn Open Session of Meeting

Next: Appendix E: Committee Biosketches »
Sustaining Global Surveillance and Response to Emerging Zoonotic Diseases Get This Book
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H1N1 ("swine flu"), SARS, mad cow disease, and HIV/AIDS are a few examples of zoonotic diseases-diseases transmitted between humans and animals. Zoonotic diseases are a growing concern given multiple factors: their often novel and unpredictable nature, their ability to emerge anywhere and spread rapidly around the globe, and their major economic toll on several disparate industries.

Infectious disease surveillance systems are used to detect this threat to human and animal health. By systematically collecting data on the occurrence of infectious diseases in humans and animals, investigators can track the spread of disease and provide an early warning to human and animal health officials, nationally and internationally, for follow-up and response. Unfortunately, and for many reasons, current disease surveillance has been ineffective or untimely in alerting officials to emerging zoonotic diseases.

Sustaining Global Surveillance and Response to Emerging Zoonotic Diseases assesses some of the disease surveillance systems around the world, and recommends ways to improve early detection and response. The book presents solutions for improved coordination between human and animal health sectors, and among governments and international organizations.

Parties seeking to improve the detection and response to zoonotic diseases--including U.S. government and international health policy makers, researchers, epidemiologists, human health clinicians, and veterinarians--can use this book to help curtail the threat zoonotic diseases pose to economies, societies, and health.

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