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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2009. Global Issues in Water, Sanitation, and Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12658.
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Page 277
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2009. Global Issues in Water, Sanitation, and Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12658.
×
Page 278
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2009. Global Issues in Water, Sanitation, and Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12658.
×
Page 279
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2009. Global Issues in Water, Sanitation, and Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12658.
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Page 280

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Appendix A Agenda Global Issues in Water, Sanitation, and Health September 23-24, 2008 The National Academies 500 Fifth Street, NW—Room 100 Washington, DC DAY 1: September 23, 2008 8:45-9:15 Registration and continental breakfast 9:15-9:45 Welcoming remarks David Relman, M.D., Chair Margaret “Peggy” A. Hamburg, M.D., Vice-Chair 9:45-10:15 Running Dry—19 minute version Followed by discussion with Jim Thebaut, writer, producer, and director 10:15-11:00 KEYNOTE REMARKS: Improving water, sanitation, and health at the grassroots Donald Hopkins, M.D., M.P.H. The Carter Center 11:00-11:45 Discussion 11:45-12:45 Lunch 277

278 GLOBAL ISSUES IN WATER, SANITATION, AND HEALTH Session I Models of Disease Emergence and Transmission Moderator: David A. Relman, Stanford University 12:45-1:15 The spectrum of water-related disease transmission processes David Bradley, Ph.D. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine 1:15-1:45 Disease prevention strategy that starts with clean water: Safer water, safer hands, and safer food Robert Tauxe, M.D., M.P.H. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1:45-2:15 Discussion 2:15-2:30 Break Session II Infrastructure Vulnerabilities—Water Distribution and Metrics for Measuring Water Quality Moderator: Margaret “Peggy” A. Hamburg, M.D., Nuclear Threat Initiative 2:30-3:00 The changing epidemiology of waterborne disease outbreaks in the United States: Implications for system infrastructure and future planning Michael Beach, Ph.D. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 3:00-3:30 Climate change and water quality Joan Rose, Ph.D. Michigan State University 3:30-4:00 Quantitative microbial risk assessment: State of the art Kelly Reynolds, Ph.D., M.S.P.H. University of Arizona 4:00-4:30 Break 4:30-5:00 Measures of water quality impacting disinfection Philip Singer, Ph.D. University of North Carolina

APPENDIX A 279 5:00-5:30 Testing methodology: Lab and field Mark Sobsey, Ph.D. University of North Carolina 5:30-6:15 Discussion of Session II 6:15 Conclusion of Day 1 7:00-9:30 Executive Session Working Dinner DAY 2: September 24, 2008 8:45-9:15 Continental breakfast 9:15-9:30 Summary of Day 1 Jim Hughes, M.D. Emory University Session III Relationships Between Human Demographics, Land Use, Infrastructure, and Disease: Lessons from Waterborne Disease Outbreaks Moderator: Jim Hughes, M.D. 9:30-10:00 Cholera in Peru: 1991, the impact of the water in the extension of the epidemic Eduardo Gotuzzo, M.D. Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Peru 10:00-10:30 Cryptosporidiosis (Milwaukee, 1993) Jeff Davis, M.D. Wisconsin Department of Health 10:30-11:00 Prevention is painfully easy in hindsight—fatal E. coli O157:H7 and Campylobacter outbreak in Walkerton, Canada, 2000 Steve Hrudey, Ph.D. University of Alberta 11:00-11:45 Discussion 11:45-12:45 Lunch and continuation of Day 2 morning discussion

280 GLOBAL ISSUES IN WATER, SANITATION, AND HEALTH Session IV Interventions to Improve Water Accessibility, Availability, and Sanitation Moderator: Jerry Keusch, M.D., Boston University 12:45-1:15 Household water treatment to prevent diarrheal disease: Effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and the challenge of scaling up Thomas Clasen, J.D., Ph.D. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine 1:15-1:45 Civil infrastructure for water, sanitation, and improved health: Existing technology, barriers, and the need for innovation Joseph Hughes, Ph.D., P.E. Georgia Institute of Technology 1:45-2:15 Social entrepreneurship meets medical research: Lessons in clean water Sharon Hrynkow, Ph.D. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences 2:15-2:45 Implementation issues Vahid Alavian, Ph.D., and Pete Kolsky, Ph.D. The World Bank 2:45-3:15 Discussion 3:15-3:45 Open discussion of Day 2 3:45-4:00 Concluding remarks/Meeting adjourns

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Global Issues in Water, Sanitation, and Health: Workshop Summary Get This Book
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As the human population grows--tripling in the past century while, simultaneously, quadrupling its demand for water--Earth's finite freshwater supplies are increasingly strained, and also increasingly contaminated by domestic, agricultural, and industrial wastes. Today, approximately one-third of the world's population lives in areas with scarce water resources. Nearly one billion people currently lack access to an adequate water supply, and more than twice as many lack access to basic sanitation services. It is projected that by 2025 water scarcity will affect nearly two-thirds of all people on the planet.

Recognizing that water availability, water quality, and sanitation are fundamental issues underlying infectious disease emergence and spread, the Institute of Medicine held a two-day public workshop, summarized in this volume. Through invited presentations and discussions, participants explored global and local connections between water, sanitation, and health; the spectrum of water-related disease transmission processes as they inform intervention design; lessons learned from water-related disease outbreaks; vulnerabilities in water and sanitation infrastructure in both industrialized and developing countries; and opportunities to improve water and sanitation infrastructure so as to reduce the risk of water-related infectious disease.

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