National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 6 BioWatch and Enhanced National Biosurveillance Resources
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Study Activities." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2011. BioWatch and Public Health Surveillance: Evaluating Systems for the Early Detection of Biological Threats: Abbreviated Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12688.
×

Appendix A
Study Activities

COMMISSIONED WORK

In two areas, the committee commissioned additional work by outside experts. David L. Buckeridge of McGill University conducted a modeling exercise to compare the timeliness of detection of biological threats via environmental air sampling, clinical case finding, and syndromic surveillance. Industrial Economics, Incorporated (IEc), a professional services firm, conducted an analysis of costs of the BioWatch program and of surveillance activities to detect biological threats through the public health and health care sectors.

COMMITTEE MEETINGS

The committee held three information-gathering meetings in Washington, DC, during the period July 2008 through November 2008. During these meetings the committee received briefings from federal, state, and local government officials; medical and laboratory professionals; and academic and private-sector researchers regarding biological threats, bioaerosol detection technologies, clinical diagnostic testing, and surveillance and detection of disease threats in clinical settings and through public health systems.

The first meeting, held on July 30–31, 2008, included speakers involved in creating the legislation relevant to the committee’s charge and speakers from selected federal agencies and professional organizations, as well as

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Study Activities." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2011. BioWatch and Public Health Surveillance: Evaluating Systems for the Early Detection of Biological Threats: Abbreviated Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12688.
×

speakers presenting the scientific perspective on bioaerosol detection technology and testing and a review of federal biosurveillance activities.

At the second meeting, held September 22–24, 2008, the committee heard from speakers on the topics of bioterrorism risk and risk analysis, BioWatch as a risk-management response, the basis for the BioWatch approach, the current operational approach and future plans, environmental monitoring and public health surveillance and response, surveillance in public health and health care, and laboratory roles in BioWatch and in infectious disease surveillance in the public health and health care systems. Speakers were chosen for their expertise in their fields.

At the third meeting, held November 3–5, 2008, the committee heard from speakers on the topics of critical information needs for decision makers, index case recognition, point-of-care diagnostics, and other operational approaches to environmental monitoring for bioterrorism. The committee also heard briefings on aspects of the threat, on aerosol plume modeling, and on past and projected costs for BioWatch.

The fourth and fifth meetings, held December 2–3, 2008, in Irvine, California, and January 26–27, 2009, in Washington, DC, respectively, were deliberative and writing meetings during which the committee developed and refined its recommendations and the members of the committee worked together to draft the report. The committee also kept in close contact by telephone and electronic communication throughout the study.

Invited Speakers

The following individuals were invited speakers at meetings of the committee:


Amy Altman, Ph.D.

Luminex Corporation


Atar Baer, Ph.D.

Seattle-King County Department of Health, WA


Vickie Baselski, Ph.D.

University of Tennessee


Paul Benda

Pentagon Force Protection Agency


Steven Bennett, Ph.D.

Department of Homeland Security


Diane Berry, Ph.D.

Department of Homeland Security


Debora Boyle, D.V.M., Ph.D.

University of Minnesota


Michael Brown, Ph.D.

Los Alamos National Laboratory


David Buckeridge, M.D., Ph.D.

McGill University


Michael Bullard, M.D.

University of Alberta, Edmonton

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Study Activities." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2011. BioWatch and Public Health Surveillance: Evaluating Systems for the Early Detection of Biological Threats: Abbreviated Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12688.
×

Svetlana Deyneka, M.D., M.P.H.

North Carolina Division of Public Health


Pamela Diaz, M.D.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


Jeffrey Engel, M.D.

North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services


Hawazin Faruki, Dr.P.H.

Laboratory Corporation of America


Martin Fenstersheib, M.D., M.P.H.

Santa Clara County Health Department, CA


P. Joseph Gibson, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Marion County Health Department, IN


Mary Gilchrist, Ph.D.

Massachusetts Department of Public Health


Chevelle Glymph, M.P.H.

Washington, DC, Department of Health


Ray Gordon

Department of Homeland Security


James Hadler, M.D., M.P.H.

Public Health Consultant


Steven Hanna, Ph.D.

Harvard School of Public Health


Katherine Heilpern, M.D.

Emory University


Penny Hitchcock, D.V.M.

Department of Homeland Security


Harvey Holmes, Ph.D.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


Robert Hooks

Department of Homeland Security


Richard Hopkins, M.D., M.S.P.H.

Florida Department of Health


William Jenkins, Jr.

Government Accountability Office (GAO)


CAPT Malcolm Johns

Department of Homeland Security


Robert Kadlec, M.D., M.T.M.H., M.A.

White House


Lawrence Kerr, Ph.D.

National Counterproliferation Center


Sara Klucking, Ph.D.

Department of Homeland Security


Gerald Kost, M.D., Ph.D.

University of California, Davis–Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory


Frances Ligler, D.Phil., D.Sc.

Naval Research Laboratory


COL Mark Malatesta

Department of Defense

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Study Activities." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2011. BioWatch and Public Health Surveillance: Evaluating Systems for the Early Detection of Biological Threats: Abbreviated Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12688.
×

Patrick Mendonca

U.S. Postal Service


Michael Osterholm, Ph.D., M.P.H.

University of Minnesota


Tara O’Toole, M.D., M.P.H.

Center for Biosecurity, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center


Herminia Palacio, M.D., M.P.H.

Harris County Public Health and Environmental Services, Texas


Art Papier, M.D.

Logical Images, Inc.


Sudha Pottumarthy, Ph.D.

Houston Public Health Laboratory, Texas


Rep. David Price, Ph.D.

U.S. House of Representatives


Stephen Quake, D.Phil.

Stanford University


Barry Rhodes, Ph.D.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


Edward Rhyne

Department of Homeland Security


Jeffrey Runge, M.D.

Department of Homeland Security


Mary Shaffran, M.P.A.

Association of Public Health Laboratories


Denise Sockwell, M.S.P.H.

Virginia Department of Health


Daniel Sosin, M.D., M.P.H.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


Jeffrey Stiefel, Ph.D.

Department of Homeland Security


Jerome Tokars, M.D., M.P.H.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

INTERIM REPORT

As called for by the Statement of Task, the committee prepared an interim report that outlined initial progress on addressing the major issues under consideration by the committee. The report was prepared at a point before conclusions or recommendations had been developed. It was released on February 10, 2009, and it is available at http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=12599.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Study Activities." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2011. BioWatch and Public Health Surveillance: Evaluating Systems for the Early Detection of Biological Threats: Abbreviated Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12688.
×
Page 189
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Study Activities." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2011. BioWatch and Public Health Surveillance: Evaluating Systems for the Early Detection of Biological Threats: Abbreviated Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12688.
×
Page 190
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Study Activities." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2011. BioWatch and Public Health Surveillance: Evaluating Systems for the Early Detection of Biological Threats: Abbreviated Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12688.
×
Page 191
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Study Activities." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2011. BioWatch and Public Health Surveillance: Evaluating Systems for the Early Detection of Biological Threats: Abbreviated Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12688.
×
Page 192
Next: Appendix B: Glossary »
BioWatch and Public Health Surveillance: Evaluating Systems for the Early Detection of Biological Threats: Abbreviated Version Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $65.00 Buy Ebook | $54.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Following the attacks of September 11, 2001 and the anthrax letters, the ability to detect biological threats as quickly as possible became a top priority. In 2003 the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) introduced the BioWatch program--a federal monitoring system intended to speed detection of specific biological agents that could be released in aerosolized form during a biological attack.

The present volume evaluates the costs and merits of both the current BioWatch program and the plans for a new generation of BioWatch devices. BioWatch and Public Health Surveillance also examines infectious disease surveillance through hospitals and public health agencies in the United States, and considers whether BioWatch and traditional infectious disease surveillance are redundant or complementary.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!